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Abandoned Mid-Canada Radar Line sites in the Western James region of Northern Ontario, Canada: a source of organochlorines for First Nations people?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80754
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2006 Nov 1;370(2-3):452-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2006
Author
Tsuji Leonard J S
Wainman Bruce C
Martin Ian D
Weber Jean-Philippe
Sutherland Celine
Nieboer Evert
Author Affiliation
Department of Environment and Resource Studies, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1. ljtsuji@2fes.uwaterloo.ca
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2006 Nov 1;370(2-3):452-66
Date
Nov-1-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
American Native Continental Ancestry Group
Animals
Birds
Diet
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Fishes
Food Contamination
Hazardous Waste
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - blood
Male
Mammals
Ontario
Abstract
The potential exists for human exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and other contaminants originating from abandoned Mid-Canada Radar Line (MCRL) sites in sub-arctic Canada. We examined patterns of differences with respect to body burden of organochlorines (lipid-adjusted) between residents of the Ontario First Nations of Fort Albany (the site of MCRL Site 050) and Kashechewan (no radar base) and Hamilton (an industrial, southern Ontario community) to assess whether the presence of Site 050 influenced organochlorine body burden with respect to the people of Fort Albany. PCBs (Aroclor 1260 and summation operator14 PCBs congeners [CBs]) and DDE in the plasma of Fort Albany and Kashechewan subjects were elevated relative to Hamilton participants. PCB and DDE-plasma levels in First Nation women were of comparable magnitude to those reported for Inuit women living in the west/central Northwest Territories. Significantly lower DDE/DDT ratios observed for Fort Albany indicates exposure to higher levels of DDT compared to Kashechewan. The probable source of DDT exposure for Fort Albany people is the DDT-contaminated soil surrounding buildings of Site 050. The results of the correspondence analysis (CA) indicated that people from Hamilton had relatively higher pesticides and lower CB body burdens, while people from Fort Albany and Kashechewan exhibited relatively higher CBs and lower pesticide levels (CA-1). The separation of Fort Albany and Kashechewan from Hamilton was also clear using questionnaire data (i.e., plotting dietary principal component [PC]-1 scores against PC-2); PC-1 was correlated with the consumption of a traditional diet. Separation of Kashechewan and Albany residents occurred because the people of Kashechewan ate more traditional meats and consumed shorebirds. Only one significant relationship was found between PC analysis and contaminant loadings; PC-1 versus CA-3 for Kashechewan. The presence of Site 050 on Anderson Island appears to have influenced organochlorine body burden of the people of Fort Albany. ANCOVA results revealed that it was not activity on Anderson Island that was important, but activity on Site 050 was the influential variable. When these results are considered with the DDE/DDT ratio data and the CB 187 results (Fort Albany and Kashechewan residents differed significantly), the findings are suggestive that Site 050 did influence organochlorine body burden of people from Fort Albany.
PubMed ID
16959301 View in PubMed
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An exploratory study of diabetes in a First Nation community with respect to serum concentrations of p,p'-DDE and PCBs and fish consumption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146289
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2009 Dec;6(12):3179-89
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Aline Philibert
Harold Schwartz
Donna Mergler
Author Affiliation
CINBIOSE, Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM), Montréal, Québec, Canada. philibert.aline@uqam.ca
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2009 Dec;6(12):3179-89
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Biological Markers
Confidence Intervals
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - blood
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental Pollutants
Female
Fishes
Food Contamination
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - blood
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Nutritional Status
Odds Ratio
Ontario - epidemiology
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Risk factors
Statistics as Topic
Young Adult
Abstract
This study examined the association between self-reported diabetes, fish consumption and serum levels of organochlorines in a First Nation community. One quarter of the 101 participants reported diabetes. Serum PCBs, but not p,p'-DDE, were positively correlated to consumption frequency of total fish, walleye and pike, but not trout. Reported diabetes was positively associated to p,p'-DDE and some PCB congeners. Odds Ratios (OR) for reported diabetes for those in the upper 75th percentile for serum p,p'-DDE compared to the others were 3.5 (95% CI 1-13.8) and 6.1 (95% CI 1.4-27.3) (weight wet and lipid-standardized values, respectively) and for total sum of PCBs: 4.91 (95% CI 1.4-19.0) and 5.51 (95% CI 1.3-24.1). For participants who were in the upper 50th percentile for trout and white fish intake, reported diabetes was respectively 6 and 4 times lower compared to the others. These findings support the hypothesis that environmental exposure to elevated p,p'-DDE and PCBs is associated with increased risk of diabetes. Consumption of trout and white fish may be beneficial to reduce risk.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20049255 View in PubMed
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Anti-parasite treatment removes negative effects of environmental pollutants on reproduction in an Arctic seabird.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80426
Source
Proc Biol Sci. 2006 Dec 22;273(1605):3117-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-22-2006
Author
Bustnes Jan O
Erikstad Kjell E
Hanssen Sveinn A
Tveraa Torkild
Folstad Ivar
Skaare Janncehe U
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute for Nature Research, The Polar Environmental Centre, 9296 Tromsø, Norway. jan.o.bustnes@nina.no
Source
Proc Biol Sci. 2006 Dec 22;273(1605):3117-22
Date
Dec-22-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anthelmintics - pharmacology
Arctic Regions
Breeding
Charadriiformes - parasitology - physiology
Chlordan - analogs & derivatives - blood
Clutch Size - drug effects
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - blood
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Hexachlorobenzene - blood
Homing Behavior - drug effects
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - blood
Male
Nesting Behavior - drug effects
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Reproduction - drug effects
Abstract
Recent studies have shown that the detrimental effects of anthropogenic pollutants may be worse if organisms are exposed to natural stress. In this study, we examined whether negative effects of organochlorines (OCs) could be influenced by parasites. In two breeding seasons, we administered an anti-helminthic drug to groups of breeding glaucous gulls (Larus hyperboreus), whereas control groups were placebo treated. In all birds, blood residues of the most important OCs in the study population (hexachlorobenzene, oxychlordane, p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene and polychlorinated biphenyl), were measured. The relationships between OCs and fitness components (i.e. nesting success and return rate between breeding seasons) were then compared between the birds receiving anti-parasite treatment and the controls. Among untreated males, higher blood residues of OCs were associated with lowered nesting success, while in males receiving anti-parasite treatment, there was no detrimental effect of OCs on fitness. Return rate was not affected by treatment or OCs. Our findings suggest that parasites may be an important factor in triggering reproductive effects of such pollutants, and that relatively low levels of OCs may have serious reproductive consequences in natural populations when stress from other sources is high.
PubMed ID
17015342 View in PubMed
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Association of maternal serum concentrations of 2,2', 4,4'5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (CB-153) and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl)-ethylene (p,p'-DDE) levels with birth weight, gestational age and preterm births in Inuit and European populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141020
Source
Environ Health. 2010;9:56
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Bogdan J Wojtyniak
Daniel Rabczenko
Bo A G Jönsson
Valentyna Zvezday
Henning S Pedersen
Lars Rylander
Gunnar Toft
Jan K Ludwicki
Katarzyna Góralczyk
Anna Lesovaya
Lars Hagmar
Jens Peter Bonde
Author Affiliation
Department-Centre of Monitoring and Analyses of Population Health, National Institute of Public Health-National Institute of Hygiene, Warsaw, Poland. bogdan@pzh.gov.pl
Source
Environ Health. 2010;9:56
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Markers - blood
Birth Weight - drug effects
Cohort Studies
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - blood - toxicity
Environmental Pollutants - blood - toxicity
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Gestational Age
Greenland
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - blood - toxicity
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - growth & development
Inuits
Male
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Poland
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Ukraine
Abstract
Epidemiological studies on the association between maternal exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and fetal growth alteration report inconsistent findings which weights in favor of additional studies.
Blood samples were collected from interviewed pregnant women in Greenland (572), Kharkiv (611) and Warsaw (258) and were analyzed for CB-153 and p,p'-DDE by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Data on birth weight, gestational age and preterm birth were obtained for 1322 singleton live births. We examined the association between natural log-transformed serum POPs concentration and birth weight and gestational age using multiple linear regression and the association with prematurity using logistic regression controlling for potential confounding factors.
The median serum concentrations of CB-153 and p,p'-DDE were for Inuit mothers 105.6 and 298.9, for Kharkiv mothers 27.0 and 645.4 and for Warsaw mothers 10.7 and 365.2 ng/g lipids, respectively. Increase in CB-153 concentration by one unit on the log scale in Inuit mothers serum was associated with significant decrease in infant birth weight of -59 g and gestational age by -0.2 week. Decreases observed in the cohorts in Kharkiv (-10 g and -0.1 week) and in Warsaw (-49 g and -0.2 week) were not statistically significant. Increase in p,p'-DDE concentration by one unit on the log scale was associated with a statistically significant decrease in infant birth weight of -39.4 g and -104.3 g and shortening of gestational age of -0.2 week and -0.6 week in the Inuit and Warsaw cohorts, respectively. In the Kharkiv cohort decrease in birth weight (-30.5 g) was not significant, however a shortening of gestational age of -0.2 week per increase in p,p'-DDE concentration by one unit on the log scale was of the borderline significance. There was no significant association between CB-153 and p,p'-DDE concentrations and risk of preterm birth however, in all cohorts the odds ratio was above 1.
In utero exposure to POPs may reduce birth weight and gestational age of newborns however, new insights as to why results vary across studies were not apparent.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20819217 View in PubMed
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The association of peripubertal serum concentrations of organochlorine chemicals and blood lead with growth and pubertal development in a longitudinal cohort of boys: a review of published results from the Russian Children's Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283496
Source
Rev Environ Health. 2017 Mar 01;32(1-2):83-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-01-2017
Author
Oleg Sergeyev
Jane S Burns
Paige L Williams
Susan A Korrick
Mary M Lee
Boris Revich
Russ Hauser
Source
Rev Environ Health. 2017 Mar 01;32(1-2):83-92
Date
Mar-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Dioxins and Dioxin-like Compounds - blood
Endocrine Disruptors - blood
Environmental Exposure
Environmental pollutants - blood
Furans - blood
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - blood
Lead - blood
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Prospective Studies
Russia
Sexual Maturation - drug effects
Young Adult
Abstract
Organochlorine chemicals and lead are environmental exposures that have endocrine disrupting properties (EDCs) which interfere with many aspects of hormone action. Childhood and adolescence are windows of susceptibility for adverse health effects of EDCs. Our ongoing study, the Russian Children's Study (RCS), is one of the few longitudinal studies investigating the impact of EDCs on growth and puberty in boys. It is conducted in the historically contaminated city of Chapaevsk, in the Samara region. The study focuses on evaluating the associations of persistent organochlorine chemicals and lead with growth and pubertal timing. At enrollment in 2003-2005, we collected blood from 516 boys at ages 8-9 years to measure dioxins, furans, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), chlorinated pesticides and lead. At enrollment and at annual visits through the ages of 18-19 years, a physician performed physical examinations that included pubertal staging and testicular volume measurements. We review the history of Chapaevsk as a research site and summarize published RCS data on the association of peripubertal serum concentrations of organochlorines and blood lead levels with growth, pubertal onset and sexual maturity. Overall, we found that persistent organochlorines and lead negatively affected growth during puberty. Our results also suggest that total toxic equivalents (TEQs), dioxin-like compounds, organochlorine pesticides and lead may delay, while nondioxin-like-PCBs may advance, the timing of male puberty. These findings promoted remediation programs in Chapaevsk, with improvement in health indicators, resulting in Chapaevsk being designated a member of the World Health Organization (WHO) network "Healthy Cities" in 2015.
PubMed ID
28231067 View in PubMed
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Associations between plasma persistent organic pollutant levels and blood pressure in Inuit adults from Nunavik.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108571
Source
Environ Int. 2013 Sep;59:282-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
  1 document  
Author
Beatriz Valera
Pierre Ayotte
Paul Poirier
Eric Dewailly
Author Affiliation
Axe santé publique et pratiques optimales en santé, Centre de recherche du CHU de Québec, Canada. beatriz.valera@crchul.ulaval.ca
Source
Environ Int. 2013 Sep;59:282-9
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
631157
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animals
Arctic Regions
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - blood
Diet
Dioxins - blood
Environmental Exposure
Environmental pollutants - blood
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - blood
Female
Fishes
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - blood
Hypertension - chemically induced - epidemiology
Inuits
Lindane - blood
Male
Mercury - blood
Middle Aged
Pesticides - blood
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Quebec - epidemiology
Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
Recent evidence suggests that exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) increases the risk of hypertension in environmentally exposed populations. High POP levels have been detected in Arctic populations and the exposure is related to high consumption of fish and marine mammals, which represent the traditional diet of these populations.
We examined the associations between polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine (OC) pesticides and hypertension among Inuit from Nunavik (Quebec, Canada).
A complete set of data was obtained for 315 Inuit=18years who participated in the "Santé Québec" health survey that was conducted in the 14 villages of Nunavik in 1992. Fourteen polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and 8 OC pesticides or their metabolites were measured in plasma samples using gas chromatography with electron capture detection. Blood pressure (BP) was measured using a standardized protocol and information regarding anti-hypertensive medication was obtained through questionnaires. The associations between log-transformed POPs and hypertension (systolic BP=140mmHg, diastolic BP=90mmHg or anti-hypertensive medication) were analyzed using multiple logistic regressions.
Total PCBs as well as the sum of non-dioxin-like PCBs were significantly associated with higher risk of hypertension. Furthermore, the risk of hypertension increased with higher plasma concentrations of congeners 101, 105, 138 and 187. Models adjusted for BP risk factors became significant after including n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and further adjustment for lead and mercury did not change the results. Regarding OC pesticides, p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p'-DDE) was associated with increased risk of hypertension while inverse associations were observed with p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (p,p'-DDT), ß-hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) and oxychlordane.
Some PCB congeners were associated with higher risk of hypertension in this highly exposed population. Most associations became significant after including n-3 PUFAs in the models. However, the analyses of OC pesticides revealed divergent results, which need to be confirmed in further cohort and experimental studies.
PubMed ID
23872387 View in PubMed
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Associations of persistent organic pollutants with abdominal obesity in the elderly: The Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132263
Source
Environ Int. 2012 Apr;40:170-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Duk-Hee Lee
Lars Lind
David R Jacobs
Samira Salihovic
Bert van Bavel
P Monica Lind
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventative Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Jung-gu, Daegu, Republic of Korea. lee_dh@knu.ac.kr
Source
Environ Int. 2012 Apr;40:170-8
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes mellitus
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - blood
Dioxins - blood
Environmental Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Halogenated Diphenyl Ethers - blood
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - blood
Male
Obesity, Abdominal - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Pesticides - blood
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Prospective Studies
Sweden
Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin - blood
Abstract
In animal experiments, persistent organic pollutants (POPs) have induced visceral obesity. To address this possibility in humans, we evaluated associations between POPs and abdominal obesity both cross-sectionally and prospectively.
Twenty-one plasma POPs (16 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, 3 organochlorine (OC) pesticides, 1 brominated diphenyl ether (BDE), and 1 dioxin) were measured at baseline in 970 participants aged 70 years of the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS), with prospective analyses in 511 participants re-examined after 5 years. Abdominal obesity was defined by an increased waist circumference.
In the cross-sectional analyses, concentrations of the less chlorinated PCBs, OC pesticides such as p,p'-DDE and dioxin had adjusted odds ratios of 2 to 3 for abdominal obesity. Many relations had inverted U-shapes rather than being linear, particularly in women. In contrast, concentrations of highly chlorinated PCBs were strongly inversely associated with abdominal obesity. In a single model including summary measures of the less chlorinated PCBs, highly chlorinated PCBs, and OC pesticides, both the positive associations and inverse associations strengthened. Similar but somewhat weaker associations were seen between POPs and risk of development of abdominal obesity in the prospective analyses.
Using both a cross-sectional and a prospective design, low-dose exposure to less chlorinated PCBs, p,p'-DDE, and dioxin, were associated with existence or development of abdominal obesity, while highly chlorinated PCBs had an opposite association in an elderly population, despite the previous observation of higher incident diabetes associated with these same PCBs.
PubMed ID
21835469 View in PubMed
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Childhood aplastic anaemia in Lucknow, India: incidence, organochlorines in the blood and review of case reports following exposure to pesticides.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82099
Source
Clin Biochem. 2006 Jul;39(7):762-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Ahamed M.
Anand M.
Kumar A.
Siddiqui M K J
Author Affiliation
Analytical Toxicology, Industrial Toxicology Research Centre, P.O. Box-80, M.G. Marg, Lucknow-226 001, India.
Source
Clin Biochem. 2006 Jul;39(7):762-6
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anemia, Aplastic - blood - chemically induced - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - blood
Incidence
India
Lindane - blood
Male
Pesticides - adverse effects
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: A hospital-based case-control study, the first in India, was conducted to determine the incidence of childhood aplastic anaemia in and around Lucknow in the backdrop of organochlorine levels in the blood and review the database for any association between the disease and exposure to pesticides. DESIGN AND METHODS: A total of 25 cases of childhood aplastic anaemia were identified as per established criteria and enrolled over the study period of 1 year. Their blood organochlorine levels were determined using a gas-liquid chromatograph equipped with an electron capture detector. RESULTS: The annual incidence of childhood aplastic anaemia in and around Lucknow was found to be 6.8 cases per million which is higher than many countries (e.g., France, Brazil, UK, and United States) but lower than those reported in Sweden, China and an European-Israeli collaborative study. Blood levels of alpha-HCH, gamma-HCH, delta-HCH, total-HCH, and p, p'-DDE were higher in children with aplastic anaemia than in those of controls; only alpha-HCH differed significantly (P
PubMed ID
16729992 View in PubMed
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Circulating levels of persistent organic pollutants in relation to visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue by abdominal MRI.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115189
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2013 Feb;21(2):413-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Vendela Roos
Monika Rönn
Samira Salihovic
Lars Lind
Bert van Bavel
Joel Kullberg
Lars Johansson
Håkan Ahlström
P Monica Lind
Author Affiliation
Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2013 Feb;21(2):413-8
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Hexachlorobenzene - blood
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - blood
Intra-Abdominal Fat - drug effects - metabolism
Linear Models
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Male
Obesity - chemically induced - pathology
Overweight - chemically induced - pathology
Pesticides - blood
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Subcutaneous Fat - drug effects - metabolism
Sweden
Abstract
We and others have shown relationships between circulating levels of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and different measures of obesity in both cross-sectional and prospective studies. Since viscerally located fat seems to be the most harmful type, we investigated whether plasma POP levels were more closely related to visceral adipose tissue (VAT) than to subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT).
Thousand hundred and sixteen subjects aged 70 years were investigated in the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study; 23 POPs were analyzed using high-resolution gas chromatography/high-resolution mass spectrometry. Abdominal magnetic resonance imaging, measuring VAT and SAT, respectively, was performed in a representative subsample of 287 subjects.
The less chlorinated polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners (105 and 118), and the pesticides dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and trans-nonachlordane (TNC) were positively related to both VAT and SAT, whereas the more highly chlorinated PCBs (153, 156, 157, 169, 170, 180, 194, 206, and 209) were inversely related to both VAT and SAT. PCB189 was related to the VAT/SAT ratio in an inverted U-shaped manner (P = 0.0008).
In conclusion, the results were in accordance with our previous studies using waist circumference and fat mass as obesity measure. However, the novel finding that PCB189 was related to the VAT/SAT ratio deserves further investigation since exposure to this PCB congener, which has previously been linked to diabetes development, might thereby play a role in the distribution of abdominal adipose tissue.
PubMed ID
23532994 View in PubMed
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Circulating levels of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) among elderly men and women from Sweden: results from the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126747
Source
Environ Int. 2012 Sep;44:59-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Samira Salihovic
Erik Lampa
Gunilla Lindström
Lars Lind
P Monica Lind
Bert van Bavel
Author Affiliation
MTM Research Centre, School of Science and Technology, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden. samira.salihovic@oru.se
Source
Environ Int. 2012 Sep;44:59-67
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Dioxins - blood
Environmental Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Hexachlorobenzene
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - blood
Male
Pesticides - blood
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Sex Factors
Sweden
Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin - blood
Abstract
Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) are a huge group of chemicals that have been linked to various adverse health effects in humans. Large epidemiological studies investigating gender differences in levels of POPs in the elderly are limited and the results from these are not always consistent. The present study was undertaken to examine the background levels of a broad range of POPs in human plasma samples among elderly men and women from Sweden and to assess the influence of gender. Levels of 23 POPs were determined in plasma samples collected during 2001-2004 from 1016 (50.2% women) 70year-old participants from the population-based Prospective Study of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS). Measurements were performed using high resolution gas chromatography with high resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC-HRMS) and the POPs studied were 16 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), five organochlorine (OC) pesticides, one dioxin, and one brominated flame retardant. The concentrations of the selected POPs were found similar, or comparable, to other studies of non-occupationally exposed populations from Sweden and Europe. Differences in levels of POPs between men and women were assessed by using Wilcoxon rank-sum (Mann-Whitney) test. Significant (p
PubMed ID
22361238 View in PubMed
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