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Behavioural and metabolic characterisation of the low satiety phenotype.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112841
Source
Appetite. 2013 Nov;70:67-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
V. Drapeau
J. Blundell
A R Gallant
H. Arguin
J-P Després
B. Lamarche
A. Tremblay
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Physical Education, Laval University, Quebec, QC, Canada. vicky.drapeau@fse.ulaval.ca
Source
Appetite. 2013 Nov;70:67-72
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - physiopathology
Appetite - physiology
Body Height
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Eating - psychology
Humans
Hunger - physiology
Male
Meals
Middle Aged
Obesity - physiopathology
Phenotype
Quebec
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Satiation - physiology
Weight Loss
Abstract
Some individuals report weak appetite sensations and thus, have higher susceptibility to overeating. The aim of this study was (1) to evaluate the reliability of the satiety quotient (SQ), a marker of satiety efficiency; (2) to characterize the biopsychobehavioural profiles of individual presenting low satiety efficiency, i.e. the low satiety phenotype and (3) to document the impact of a weight loss program on these profiles. Sixty-nine obese men (BMI 33.6±3.0 kg/m², age 41.5±5.7 years) participated in a 16-week, non-restrictive weight loss intervention. Visual analog scales for appetite sensations in response to a test-meal were completed twice at baseline. Blood samples were collected before and during one test-meal. Questionnaires were administered before and after the intervention. The mean SQ showed good reliability (ICC=0.67). Baseline SQ scores tended to be negatively correlated with external hunger, anxiety and night eating symptoms (p
PubMed ID
23792908 View in PubMed
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Food insecurity and hunger are prevalent among HIV-positive individuals in British Columbia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175528
Source
J Nutr. 2005 Apr;135(4):820-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Lena Normén
Keith Chan
Paula Braitstein
Aranka Anema
Greg Bondy
Julio S G Montaner
Robert S Hogg
Author Affiliation
Canadian HIV Trials Network, Pacific Region, St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. lnormen@providencehealth.bc.ca
Source
J Nutr. 2005 Apr;135(4):820-5
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia - epidemiology
Educational Status
Employment
Female
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
HIV Seropositivity - epidemiology - transmission
Health Surveys
Housing
Humans
Hunger - physiology
Income
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Abstract
Hunger and food insecurity are important factors that may affect an individual's nutritional state and should therefore be assessed in nutrition surveillance activities. The objective of this study was to determine the level of food insecurity and hunger among HIV-positive persons accessing antiretroviral therapy in British Columbia. A cross-sectional study was performed in the BC HIV/AIDS drug treatment program, a province-wide source of free-of-charge antiretroviral medications. In 1998-1999, participants completed a questionnaire focusing on personal information, health, and clinical status. Food and hunger issues were evaluated with the Radimer/Cornell questionnaire. Overall, 1213 responding men and women were classified as food secure (52%), food insecure without hunger (27%), or food insecure with hunger (21%). In both categories of food insecurity, individuals were significantly more likely to be women, aboriginals, living with children, and to have less education, a history of recreational injection drug and/or alcohol abuse, and an unstable housing situation (P
PubMed ID
15795441 View in PubMed
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Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2005;66(1):3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Dawna Royall
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2005;66(1):3
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Food Supply
Humans
Hunger - physiology
Poverty
PubMed ID
15780149 View in PubMed
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Hunger state affects both olfactory abilities and gustatory sensitivity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280726
Source
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 2016 Jul;273(7):1637-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2016
Author
Deniz Hanci
Huseyin Altun
Source
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 2016 Jul;273(7):1637-41
Date
Jul-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Finland
Humans
Hunger - physiology
Male
Olfactometry - methods
Olfactory Perception - physiology
Prospective Studies
Satiety Response - physiology
Smell - physiology
Taste - physiology
Taste Perception - physiology
Abstract
Chemical senses such as odor, taste and appearance are directly related with appetite. Understanding the relation between appetite and flavor is getting more important due to increasing number of obese patients worldwide. The literature on the studies investigating the change in olfactory abilities and gustatory sensitivity mostly performed using food-related odors and tastes rather than standardized tests were developed to study olfaction and gustation. Therefore, results are inconsistent and the relationship between olfactory and gustatory sensitivity with respect to the actual state of human satiety is still not completely understood. Here, for the first time in literature, we investigated the change in both olfactory abilities and gustatory sensitivity in hunger and in satiety using 123 subjects (37 men, 86 women; mean age 31.4 years, age range 21-41 years). The standardized Sniffin' Sticks Extended Test and Taste Strips were used for olfactory testing and gustatory sensitivity, respectively. TDI score (range 1-48) was calculated as the collective scores of odor threshold (T), odor discrimination (D) and odor identification (I). The evaluation was performed in two successive days where the hunger state of test subjects was confirmed by blood glucose test strips (mean blood glucose level 90.0 ± 5.6 mg/dl in hunger and 131.4 ± 8.1 mg/dl in satiety). The results indicated statistically significant decrease in olfaction in satiety compared to hunger (mean TDI 39.3 ± 1.1 in hunger, 37.4 ± 1.1 in satiety, p 
PubMed ID
25744049 View in PubMed
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Measuring hunger in the Russian Federation using the Radimer/Cornell hunger scale.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205247
Source
Bull World Health Organ. 1998;76(2):143-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
K J Welch
N. Mock
O. Netrebenko
Author Affiliation
Medical Center, Louisiana HIV Outpatient Clinic, New Orleans 70112, USA.
Source
Bull World Health Organ. 1998;76(2):143-8
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Food Deprivation - physiology
Humans
Hunger - physiology
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Mothers
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Russia - epidemiology
Sampling Studies
Severity of Illness Index
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Compared in the study are the results obtained using the Radimer/Cornell hunger scale to measure the prevalence of hunger in random samples of mothers and their households in the Russian Federation and in the USA in 1993. The 12 items in the scale measured hunger at three levels: household, women, and children. If the mother answered positively to one of the four items at a particular level, hunger was established for that level. The prevalence of hunger in the Russian Federation was very high: approximately 77% of the women surveyed, 70% of the households, and 32% of the children were classified as hungry. The corresponding estimated prevalences of hunger in New York State in 1993 were 46.8%, 25.9% and 18.3%. In both surveys, children were the least likely to be classified as hungry and, if they were, their mothers and households were almost always hungry. In both surveys, the hunger scale proved to have criterion-related validity. Basic indicators of household socioeconomic and demographic well-being were highly related to the three levels of hunger. The higher level of hunger in the Russian survey can be explained by the very low incomes. Further study of the nutritional status of the Russian population is recommended.
Notes
Cites: J Nutr. 1990 Nov;120 Suppl 11:1544-82243303
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1996 Mar;86(3):321-38604755
Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 1996;74(6):605-129060221
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1996 Mar;86(3):361-78604761
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1996 Mar;86(3):355-608604760
PubMed ID
9648354 View in PubMed
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