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Adverse health effects of experiencing food insecurity among Greenlandic school children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107728
Source
Pages 774-780 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):774-780
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
another 25% lived in severe child food-insecure homes (3). In 2010, 27% of Alaskan households with children were food insecure compared to 19% of households in the United States (2). 774 Only a few studies have investigated the effects of food insecurity, food shortage or hunger in the general
  1 document  
Author
Birgit Niclasen
Max Petzold
Christina W Schnohr
Author Affiliation
Greenlandic Branch, National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen, Denmark
Source
Pages 774-780 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):774-780
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Child
Female
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Greenland - epidemiology
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Hunger
Male
Poverty - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
In vulnerable populations, food security in children has been found to be associated with negative health effects. Still, little is known about whether the negative health effects can be retrieved in children at the population level.
To examine food insecurity reported by Greenlandic school children as a predictor for perceived health, physical symptoms and medicine use.
The study is based on the Greenlandic part of the Health Behavior in School-aged Children survey. The 2010 survey included 2,254 students corresponding to 40% of all Greenlandic school children in Grade 5 through 10. The participation rate in the participating schools was 65%. Food insecurity was measured as going to bed or to school hungry because there was no food at home.
Boys, the youngest children (11-12 year-olds), and children from low affluence homes were at increased risk for food insecurity. Poor or fair self-rated health, medicine use last month and physical symptoms during the last 6 months were all more frequent in children reporting food insecurity. Controlling for age, gender and family affluence odds ratio (OR) for self-rated health was 1.60 (95% confidence interval (CI 1.23-2.06) (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
23984271 View in PubMed
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An examination of at-home food preparation activity among low-income, food-insecure women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183147
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2003 Nov;103(11):1506-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Carey McLaughlin
Valerie Tarasuk
Nancy Kreiger
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2003 Nov;103(11):1506-12
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Cooking - methods
Diet
Energy intake
Family Characteristics
Female
Food Services
Food Supply
Health promotion
Humans
Hunger
Income
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Poverty
United States
Women's health
Abstract
A secondary analysis of data from a study of nutritional vulnerability among 153 women in families seeking charitable food assistance was undertaken to estimate the extent and nutritional significance of at-home food preparation activity for these women. At-home food preparation was estimated from women's reported food intakes from three 24-hour recalls. The relationships between food preparation and energy and nutrient intake, food intake, and 30-day household food security status were characterized. Almost all participants (97%) consumed foods prepared from scratch at least once during the three days of observation; 57% did so each day. Both the frequency and complexity of at-home food preparation were positively related to women's energy and nutrient intakes and their consumption of fruits and vegetables, grain products, and meat and alternates. The intakes by women in households with food insecurity with hunger reflected less complex food preparation but no less preparation from scratch than women in households where hunger was not evident, raising questions about the extent to which food skills can protect very poor families from food insecurity and hunger. Our findings indicate the need for nutrition professionals to become effective advocates for policy reforms to lessen economic constraints on poor households.
PubMed ID
14576717 View in PubMed
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Assessing the relevance of neighbourhood characteristics to the household food security of low-income Toronto families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145125
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2010 Jul;13(7):1139-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Sharon I Kirkpatrick
Valerie Tarasuk
Author Affiliation
Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, 6130 Executive Boulevard EPN 4005, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. sharon.kirkpatrick@nih.gov
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2010 Jul;13(7):1139-48
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Commerce - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Family Characteristics
Female
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Hunger
Logistic Models
Male
Ontario
Poverty
Public Assistance - statistics & numerical data
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Abstract
Although the sociodemographic characteristics of food-insecure households have been well documented, there has been little examination of neighbourhood characteristics in relation to this problem. In the present study we examined the association between household food security and neighbourhood features including geographic food access and perceived neighbourhood social capital.
Cross-sectional survey and mapping of discount supermarkets and community food programmes.
Twelve high-poverty neighbourhoods in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Respondents from 484 low-income families who had children and who lived in rental accommodations.
Food insecurity was pervasive, affecting two-thirds of families with about a quarter categorized as severely food insecure, indicative of food deprivation. Food insecurity was associated with household factors including income and income source. However, food security did not appear to be mitigated by proximity to food retail or community food programmes, and high rates of food insecurity were observed in neighbourhoods with good geographic food access. While low perceived neighbourhood social capital was associated with higher odds of food insecurity, this effect did not persist once we accounted for household sociodemographic factors.
Our findings raise questions about the extent to which neighbourhood-level interventions to improve factors such as food access or social cohesion can mitigate problems of food insecurity that are rooted in resource constraints. In contrast, the results reinforce the importance of household-level characteristics and highlight the need for interventions to address the financial constraints that underlie problems of food insecurity.
PubMed ID
20196916 View in PubMed
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Baseline determinants of global diet quality in older men and women from the NuAge cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114228
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2013;17(5):419-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
B. Shatenstein
L. Gauvin
H. Keller
L. Richard
P. Gaudreau
F. Giroux
K. Gray-Donald
M. Jabbour
J A Morais
H. Payette
Author Affiliation
Centre de recherche, Institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal, 4565 Queen Mary, Montréal, QC Canada, H3W 1W5. bryna.shatenstein@umontreal.ca
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2013;17(5):419-25
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Drinking
Body mass index
Dentures
Diet - standards
Diet Records
Diet Surveys
Educational Status
Female
Food Habits
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health status
Humans
Hunger
Male
Mastication
Meals
Mental Recall
Multivariate Analysis
Perception
Quebec
Regression Analysis
Restaurants
Sex Factors
Abstract
Judicious food choices are of prime importance during aging.
This study was conducted to identify individual and collective attributes determining global diet quality (DQ).
Participants were 1,793 adults (52% women) from the NuAge study on nutrition and successful aging. Subjects aged 67 to 84 years in relatively good health were recruited from the Québec Medicare Database. Sociodemographic, affective, and cognitive data, health conditions, perceived physical health and functional status, dietary habits and dietary attributes and community resources were obtained using questionnaires. Body weight and height were measured and body mass index (BMI) was calculated. Three non-consecutive 24-hour diet recalls were collected at recruitment. DQ, assessed using the Canadian Healthy Eating Index (C-HEI, /100), was computed on the mean intakes from the diet recalls. Analyses were stratified by gender. Variables significantly related to DQ in bivariate analyses (p
PubMed ID
23636542 View in PubMed
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Behavioural and metabolic characterisation of the low satiety phenotype.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112841
Source
Appetite. 2013 Nov;70:67-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
V. Drapeau
J. Blundell
A R Gallant
H. Arguin
J-P Després
B. Lamarche
A. Tremblay
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Physical Education, Laval University, Quebec, QC, Canada. vicky.drapeau@fse.ulaval.ca
Source
Appetite. 2013 Nov;70:67-72
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - physiopathology
Appetite - physiology
Body Height
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Eating - psychology
Humans
Hunger - physiology
Male
Meals
Middle Aged
Obesity - physiopathology
Phenotype
Quebec
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Satiation - physiology
Weight Loss
Abstract
Some individuals report weak appetite sensations and thus, have higher susceptibility to overeating. The aim of this study was (1) to evaluate the reliability of the satiety quotient (SQ), a marker of satiety efficiency; (2) to characterize the biopsychobehavioural profiles of individual presenting low satiety efficiency, i.e. the low satiety phenotype and (3) to document the impact of a weight loss program on these profiles. Sixty-nine obese men (BMI 33.6±3.0 kg/m², age 41.5±5.7 years) participated in a 16-week, non-restrictive weight loss intervention. Visual analog scales for appetite sensations in response to a test-meal were completed twice at baseline. Blood samples were collected before and during one test-meal. Questionnaires were administered before and after the intervention. The mean SQ showed good reliability (ICC=0.67). Baseline SQ scores tended to be negatively correlated with external hunger, anxiety and night eating symptoms (p
PubMed ID
23792908 View in PubMed
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Benefits and barriers associated with participation in food programs in three low-income Ontario communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193476
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2001;62(2):76-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
H G Edward
S. Evers
Author Affiliation
St. Joseph's Health Care System Research Network, Hamilton, ON.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2001;62(2):76-81
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Child, Preschool
Consumer Participation
Diet
Female
Focus Groups
Food Services - utilization
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Hunger
Infant
Male
Ontario
Poverty - psychology
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Our objective was to identify the benefits and barriers associated with participation in food programs. We did a content analysis of focus groups with parents (n=21), teachers (n=10), project staff (n=21), and children (n=17) in three low-income Ontario communities. The key benefits identified by the three adult groups were hunger alleviation and social contact opportunities for both parents and children. Parents also benefited from volunteering with and/or participating in food programs because neighbourhood support networks developed. Teachers reported that children who attended breakfast programs became more attentive in school. The food programs also provided an opportunity for nutrition education. Offering food as part of all community programs (not just those designed to increase food availability) encouraged participation and increased attendance. Children thought that attending food programs kept them healthy, and helped them work harder in school. Parents' pride was the main barrier to participation in programs; however, parents who were actively involved in program delivery did not feel stigmatized accepting food. To encourage participation, nutrition professionals should collaborate with local residents to develop and implement community-based food programs.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Diet Pract Res. 2002 Summer;63(2):52; author reply 52-312084182
PubMed ID
11524050 View in PubMed
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Beverage consumption in low income, "milk-friendly" families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150389
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2009;70(2):95-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
N Theresa Glanville
Lynn McIntyre
Author Affiliation
Department of Applied Human Nutrition, Mount Saint Vincent University, Halifax, NS, Canada.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2009;70(2):95-8
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Beverages - economics - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Child, Preschool
Family Characteristics
Female
Food Supply
Humans
Hunger
Infant
Male
Mental Recall
Milk - economics - statistics & numerical data
Poverty
Questionnaires
Abstract
Beverage consumption by poor, lone mother-led, "milk-friendly" families living in Atlantic Canada was characterized over a one-month income cycle.
Beverage intake and food security status were assessed weekly, using a 24-hour dietary recall and the Cornell-Radimer food insecurity questionnaire. Families were classified as "milk friendly" if total consumption of milk was 720 mL on a single day during the month. Beverage intake was assessed using t-tests, analysis of variance (ANOVA), repeated measures ANOVA with post hoc comparisons, and chi-square analysis.
Milk consumption by milk-friendly families (76; total sample, 129) was highest at the time of the month when they had the most money to spend. During all time intervals, mothers consumed the least amount of milk and children aged one to three years consumed the most. Mothers consumed carbonated beverages disproportionately, while children of all ages consumed more fruit juice/drink. Mothers' coffee consumption was profoundly increased when either they or their children were hungry.
The quality of beverage intake by members of low-income households fluctuates in accordance with financial resources available to purchase foods. Mothers' beverage intake is compromised by the degree of food insecurity the family experiences.
PubMed ID
19515273 View in PubMed
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Canadian MPs dismiss findings that food policies are leading to hunger and obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124229
Source
BMJ. 2012;344:e3550
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012

Characterization of household food insecurity in Qu├ębec: food and feelings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191728
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2002 Jan;54(1):119-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
Anne-Marie Hamelin
Micheline Beaudry
Jean-Pierre Habicht
Author Affiliation
Psychosocial Research Division, Douglas Hospital Research Centre, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada. anne.marie.hamelin@videotron.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2002 Jan;54(1):119-32
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anxiety - etiology
Diet
Family Characteristics
Family Health
Feeding Behavior
Female
Food Supply - economics
Humans
Hunger
Internal-External Control
Interviews as Topic
Male
Nutritional Status
Poverty - psychology
Quebec
Social Alienation
Urban Population
Abstract
This study was undertaken to understand food insecurity from the perspective of households who experienced it. The results of group interviews and personal interviews with 98 low-income households from urban and rural areas in and around Québec City, Canada, elicited the meaning of "enough food" for the households and the range of manifestations of food insecurity. Two classes of manifestations characterized the experience of food insecurity: (1) its core characteristics: a lack of food encompassing the shortage of food, the unsuitability of both food and diet and a preoccupation with continuity in access to enough food; and a lack of control of households over their food situation; and (2) a related set of potential reactions: socio-familial perturbations, hunger and physical impairment, and psychological suffering. The results substantiate the existence of food insecurity among Québecers and confirm that the nature of this experience is consistent with many of the core components identified in upstate New York. This study underlines the monotony of the diet, describes the feeling of alienation, differentiates between a lack of food and the reactions that it engenders, and emphasizes the dynamic nature of the experience.
PubMed ID
11820676 View in PubMed
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