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214 records – page 1 of 22.

[A journey round my wife -- Mrs. Karinthy, Aranka Böhm, MD (1893-1944)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133367
Source
Orv Hetil. 2011 Jul 10;152(28):1137-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-10-2011

Alcohol consumption and the risk of major upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11381
Source
Am J Gastroenterol. 1995 Jul;90(7):1058-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1995
Author
J P Kelly
D W Kaufman
R S Koff
A. Laszlo
B E Wiholm
S. Shapiro
Author Affiliation
Slone Epidemiology Unit, School of Public Health, Boston University School of Medicine, Brookline, Massachusetts, USA.
Source
Am J Gastroenterol. 1995 Jul;90(7):1058-64
Date
Jul-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Alcoholic Beverages
Case-Control Studies
Female
Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Hungary - epidemiology
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between current alcohol consumption and major upper gastrointestinal bleeding. METHODS: In a case-control study in the United States, Sweden, and Hungary, 1004 incident cases with upper gastrointestinal bleeding without predisposing factors were compared with 2446 controls. Relative risks for categories of alcohol consumption (based on the number of drinks currently consumed/wk) were estimated using logistic regression; the potential confounding effects of cigarettes, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and other factors were controlled simultaneously. RESULTS: Compared with drinkers of or = 35 drinks; the trend was statistically significant (p or = 60 yr; and those who consumed beer, wine, liquor, or a combination of beverages. CONCLUSIONS: These findings provide evidence that consumption of alcohol increases the risk of major gastric and duodenal bleeding in nonpredisposed individuals.
PubMed ID
7611196 View in PubMed
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Analysis of multiple congenital anomalies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65234
Source
Prog Clin Biol Res. 1990;340C:187-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
A. Czeizel
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Genetics and Teratology, National Institute of Hygiene, Budapest, Hungary.
Source
Prog Clin Biol Res. 1990;340C:187-95
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Multiple - epidemiology - genetics
Accidents
Female
Humans
Hungary - epidemiology
Mutation
Nuclear Reactors
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Registries
Ukraine
PubMed ID
2381924 View in PubMed
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Apiotrichum terrigenum sp. nov., a soil-associated yeast found in both the UK and mainland Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284769
Source
Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2016 Dec;66(12):5046-5050
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
Stephen A James
Christopher J Bond
Rachael Stanley
Sreenivas R Ravella
Gábor Péter
Dénes Dlauchy
Ian N Roberts
Source
Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2016 Dec;66(12):5046-5050
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Basidiomycota - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
DNA, Fungal - genetics
DNA, Ribosomal Spacer - genetics
Hungary
Mycological Typing Techniques
Norway
Phylogeny
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Soil Microbiology
United Kingdom
Abstract
Five arthroconidium-producing yeast strains representing a novel Trichosporon-like species were independently isolated from the UK, Hungary and Norway. Two strains (Bio4T and Bio21) were isolated from biogas reactors used for processing grass silage, with a third strain (S8) was isolated from soil collected at the same UK site. Two additional strains were isolated in mainland Europe, one from soil in Norway (NCAIM Y.02175) and the other from sewage in Hungary (NCAIM Y.02176). Sequence analyses of the D1/D2 domains of the LSU rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region indicated that the novel species belongs to the recently reinstated genus Apiotrichum and is most closely related to Apiotrichum scarabaeorum, a beetle-associated species first found in South Africa. Despite having similar physiological characteristics, the two species can be readily distinguished from one another by ITS sequencing. The species name Apiotrichum terrigenum sp. nov. is proposed to accommodate these strains, with Bio4T (=CBS 11373T=NCYC 3540T) designated as the type strain. The Mycobank deposit number is MB817431.
Notes
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1988 Apr;85(8):2444-83162770
Cites: Stud Mycol. 2015 Jun;81:1-2626955196
Cites: Mol Biol Evol. 2013 Dec;30(12):2725-924132122
Cites: FEMS Yeast Res. 2001 Apr;1(1):15-2212702459
Cites: Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2000 May;50 Pt 3:1351-7110843082
Cites: Int J Syst Bacteriol. 1996 Jan;46(1):189-948573494
Cites: Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2004 May;54(Pt 3):975-8615143052
Cites: Stud Mycol. 2015 Jun;81:85-14726955199
Cites: Nucleic Acids Res. 1994 Nov 11;22(22):4673-807984417
PubMed ID
27580597 View in PubMed
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[Arterial pressure in adolescents (an international study in Moscow, Kaunas, Berlin, Budapest and Havana)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244695
Source
Kardiologiia. 1981 Mar;21(3):67-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1981

The assessment of speech-related attitudes and beliefs of people who stutter.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220479
Source
ASHA Monogr. 1993 Sep;(29):1-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1993

Association of AADAC Deletion and Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome in a Large European Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277219
Source
Biol Psychiatry. 2016 Mar 1;79(5):383-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2016
Author
Birgitte Bertelsen
Hreinn Stefánsson
Lars Riff Jensen
Linea Melchior
Nanette Mol Debes
Camilla Groth
Liselotte Skov
Thomas Werge
Iordanis Karagiannidis
Zsanett Tarnok
Csaba Barta
Peter Nagy
Luca Farkas
Karen Brøndum-Nielsen
Renata Rizzo
Mariangela Gulisano
Dan Rujescu
Lambertus A Kiemeney
Sarah Tosato
Muhammad Sulaman Nawaz
Andres Ingason
Unnur Unnsteinsdottir
Stacy Steinberg
Pétur Ludvigsson
Kari Stefansson
Andreas Walter Kuss
Peristera Paschou
Danielle Cath
Pieter J Hoekstra
Kirsten Müller-Vahl
Manfred Stuhrmann
Asli Silahtaroglu
Rolph Pfundt
Zeynep Tümer
Source
Biol Psychiatry. 2016 Mar 1;79(5):383-91
Date
Mar-1-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - genetics
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
DNA Copy Number Variations - genetics
Denmark
Exons
Female
Genotyping Techniques
Germany
Humans
Hungary
Iceland
Italy
Male
Mice
Netherlands
Sequence Deletion - genetics
Tourette Syndrome - genetics
Abstract
Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) is a complex neuropsychiatric disorder with a strong genetic influence where copy number variations are suggested to play a role in disease pathogenesis. In a previous small-scale copy number variation study of a GTS cohort (n = 111), recurrent exon-affecting microdeletions of four genes, including the gene encoding arylacetamide deacetylase (AADAC), were observed and merited further investigations.
We screened a Danish cohort of 243 GTS patients and 1571 control subjects for submicroscopic deletions and duplications of these four genes. The most promising candidate gene, AADAC, identified in this Danish discovery sample was further investigated in cohorts from Iceland, the Netherlands, Hungary, Germany, and Italy, and a final meta-analysis, including a total of 1181 GTS patients and 118,730 control subjects from these six European countries, was performed. Subsequently, expression of the candidate gene in the central nervous system was investigated using human and mouse brain tissues.
In the Danish cohort, we identified eight patients with overlapping deletions of AADAC. Investigation of the additional five countries showed a significant association between the AADAC deletion and GTS, and a final meta-analysis confirmed the significant association (p = 4.4 ? 10(-4); odds ratio = 1.9; 95% confidence interval = 1.33-2.71). Furthermore, RNA in situ hybridization and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction studies revealed that AADAC is expressed in several brain regions previously implicated in GTS pathology.
AADAC is a candidate susceptibility factor for GTS and the present findings warrant further genomic and functional studies to investigate the role of this gene in the pathogenesis of GTS.
Notes
Comment In: Biol Psychiatry. 2016 Mar 1;79(5):341-226847659
PubMed ID
26444075 View in PubMed
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Attachment styles and demographic factors as predictors of sociocultural and psychological adjustment of Eastern European immigrants in the Netherlands.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154952
Source
Int J Psychol. 2008 Oct;43(5):919-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Elzbieta Polek
Jan Pieter van Oudenhoven
Jos M F Ten Berge
Author Affiliation
University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
Source
Int J Psychol. 2008 Oct;43(5):919-28
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Female
Humans
Hungary - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands
Object Attachment
Poland - ethnology
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Russia - ethnology
Social Adjustment
Social Support
Young Adult
Abstract
The present study examined the relationship between adult attachment styles and psychological and sociocultural adjustment of Polish, Russian, and Hungarian immigrants (N = 631) to Dutch society. In addition, it also examined the relationship between demographic factors and adjustment and compared the predictive value of attachment styles and demographic factors for immigrants' adjustment. The Attachment Style Questionnaire was used to assess respondents' attachment. Psychological adjustment was measured with the Psychological Health Scale and the Satisfaction With Life Scale. Sociocultural adjustment was measured with the Social Support List - Interactions scale. Two scales for measuring identification and contact with the native and with the Dutch culture were developed and used as indicators of cultural adjustment. We found relations between attachment styles and psychological and sociocultural adjustment. Secure attachment was positively related (p
PubMed ID
22022799 View in PubMed
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Babesia genotypes in Haemaphysalis concinna collected from birds in Hungary reflect phylogeographic connections with Siberia and the Far East.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290398
Source
Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2017 06; 8(4):666-670
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-2017
Author
Barbara Flaisz
Kinga M Sulyok
Dávid Kováts
Jeno Kontschán
Tibor Csörgo
Ármin Csipak
Miklós Gyuranecz
Sándor Hornok
Author Affiliation
Department of Parasitology and Zoology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Budapest, Hungary.
Source
Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2017 06; 8(4):666-670
Date
06-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animal Migration
Animals
Babesia - genetics
Babesiosis - epidemiology - parasitology
Bird Diseases - epidemiology - parasitology
Birds
Genotype
Hungary - epidemiology
Ixodidae - growth & development - microbiology - physiology
Larva - growth & development - microbiology - physiology
Nymph - growth & development - microbiology - physiology
Phylogeography
RNA, Protozoan - genetics
RNA, Ribosomal, 18S - genetics
Abstract
Haemaphysalis concinna is the second most common tick species attaching to birds in Hungary. Recently, Babesia genotypes, found in Siberia and the Far East, have been detected in this tick species collected from the vegetation in Hungary and Slovakia. The aim of this study was to molecularly investigate if these piroplasms also occur in H. concinna carried by migratory birds, which might explain their occurrence in the western Palaearctic. During a 2-year period, 321 H. concinna larvae and nymphs were collected from 121 passerine birds (of 19 species) in Hungary. These were molecularly investigated for the presence of piroplasm DNA with PCR and sequencing. The prevalence of PCR positive ticks was 15.9% (51 out of 321). Piroplasm PCR positivity of H. concinna ticks was significantly more frequent during the summer and autumn compared to spring, suggesting that migratory birds arriving in Hungary from the north or north east are the most important in the dispersal of H. concinna-associated piroplasms. Three genotypes, i.e. Babesia sp. "Irk-Hc133", "Irk-Hc130" (originally found in Irkutsk, Siberia) and "Kh-Hc222" (originally found in Khabarovsk, Far East) were detected. Phylogenetically all these belonged to the group formed by Babesia spp. of ruminants. Four bird species, which had 14-60% prevalence of PCR positive ticks, are known to be associated with northeast to southwest autumn migration. In conclusion, the presence of Central and East Asian Babesia genotypes in Central Europe are most likely related to bird species with known eastern migratory habit and/or phylogenetically substantiated connections between their eastern and western Eurasian populations.
PubMed ID
28499722 View in PubMed
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214 records – page 1 of 22.