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225 records – page 1 of 23.

The 3-year follow-up study in a block of flats - experiences in the use of the Finnish indoor climate classification.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185305
Source
Indoor Air. 2003 Jun;13(2):136-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
M. Tuomainen
A. Tuomainen
J. Liesivuori
A-L Pasanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Kuopio, Finland. marja.tuomainen@hengitysliitto.fi
Source
Indoor Air. 2003 Jun;13(2):136-47
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air pollution, indoor
Allergens - analysis
Ammonia - analysis
Asthma - prevention & control
Bacteria
Carbon Dioxide - analysis
Carbon Monoxide - analysis
Construction Materials - standards
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Housing - standards
Humans
Humidity
Questionnaires
Spores, Fungal
Temperature
Abstract
Indoor climate of two new blocks of flats was investigated. The case building was built for people with respiratory diseases by following the instructions of the Finnish Classification of Indoor Climate, Construction and Finishing Materials, while the control building was built using conventional building technology. The main indoor air parameters (temperature, relative humidity and levels of CO, CO2, ammonia, total volatile organic compounds, total suspended particles, fungal spores, bacteria and cat, dog and house dust mite allergens) were measured in six apartments of both the buildings on five occasions during the 3-year occupancy. In addition, a questionnaire to evaluate symptoms of the occupants and their satisfaction with their home environment was conducted in connection with indoor air quality (IAQ) measurements. The levels of indoor air pollutants in the case building were, in general, lower than those in the control building. In addition, the asthmatic occupants informed that their symptoms had decreased during the occupancy in the case building. This case study showed that high IAQ is possible to reach by careful design, proper materials and equipment and on high-quality construction with reasonable additional costs. In addition, the study indicated that good IAQ can also be maintained during the occupancy, if sufficient information on factors affecting IAQ and guidance on proper use and care of equipment are available for occupants.
PubMed ID
12756007 View in PubMed
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Aetiology of spheroidal degeneration of the cornea in Labrador.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244607
Source
Br J Ophthalmol. 1981 Apr;65(4):270-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1981
Author
G J Johnson
Source
Br J Ophthalmol. 1981 Apr;65(4):270-83
Date
Apr-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Corneal Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Humidity
Ice
Male
Middle Aged
Newfoundland and Labrador
Snow
Temperature
Ultraviolet Rays - adverse effects
Wind
Abstract
To determine the aetiology of spheroidal degeneration of the cornea (Labrador keratopathy), total population surveys were conducted in 5 communities in coastal Labrador and northern Newfoundland. For 4 years records were also kept on all clinic patients aged 40 or more throughout the region. Both methods gave a peak prevalence at latitudes 55 degrees--56 degrees north. The greatest severity and earliest age of onset occurred around the same latitudes. Of the proposed environmental causative agents only ultraviolet radiation, reflected from ice and snow, explains the distribution of the disease. The high cumulative UV dosage is due to the unique geographical and climatic features of the region.
Notes
Cites: Exp Eye Res. 1965 Dec;4(4):355-635867355
Cites: Acta Ophthalmol (Copenh). 1972;50(4):532-84678271
Cites: Am J Ophthalmol. 1972 Nov;74(5):821-84539458
Cites: Arch Ophthalmol. 1973 Jan;89(1):36-454630887
Cites: Arch Ophthalmol. 1973 Mar;89(3):193-74120598
Cites: Can J Ophthalmol. 1973 Apr;8(2):298-3054541018
Cites: Acta Ophthalmol (Copenh). 1974;52(6):777-854549005
Cites: Can J Ophthalmol. 1975 Apr;10(2):119-351125837
Cites: Am J Pathol. 1977 Dec;89(3):718-808339743
Cites: Br J Ophthalmol. 1978 Jan;62(1):53-61629911
Cites: Arch Ophthalmol. 1965 Aug;74:198-20214318495
PubMed ID
7236572 View in PubMed
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Agents causing occupational asthma in Finland in 1986-2002: cow epithelium bypassed by moulds from moisture-damaged buildings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171311
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2005 Dec;35(12):1632-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
R. Piipari
H. Keskinen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland. Ritva.Piipari@ttl.fi
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2005 Dec;35(12):1632-7
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Agricultural Workers' Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Animals
Asthma - chemically induced - epidemiology - microbiology
Cattle
Environmental Pollutants
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Fungi
Humans
Humidity
Irritants - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology - microbiology
Occupations
Prevalence
Sex Distribution
Workplace
Abstract
Occupational asthma is an avoidable form of asthma. In Finland, the diagnosis of occupational asthma entitles substantial compensation to the employee. The diagnostics are based on symptoms, exposure assessment, allergologic investigations, follow-up of peak expiratory flow (PEF) at work and at home and, in many cases, specific challenge tests.
To study the causative agents of occupational asthma in Finland.
The causative agents and the numbers of new occupational asthma cases notified to the Finnish Register of Occupational Diseases (FROD) during 1986-2002 are reported.
The number of occupational asthma cases increased from 1986 until 1995, after which a downward trend, stabilizing during the last few years, has been observed. The majority of the cases (59%) in the beginning of the period (1986-1990) were associated with agriculture, but the percentage has fallen thereafter (42% of the cases in 1998-2002) along with the fall in the total number of cases. Since 1995, indoor moulds from water-damaged buildings have caused an increasing number of cases and have become the most important causative agents (0.5% cases, in 1986-1990 and 18% of the cases in 1998-2002). Chemicals have caused 10-30% of the cases, a decreasing number since 1990. The most important chemicals causing occupational asthma have been diisocyanates and welding fumes, followed by hairdressing chemicals and formaldehyde.
The number of occupational asthma cases in Finland reached its height in the mid-1990s. The decrease in the number of total cases is because of the decrease in agriculture-associated cases, reflecting the number of employees in agriculture-associated occupations, which has greatly decreased since Finland joined the EU in 1995. An epidemic of mould-induced asthma, affecting mostly white-collar employees working in moisture-damaged buildings, has taken place since 1995.
PubMed ID
16393330 View in PubMed
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Air pollution and emergency department visits for chest pain and weakness in Edmonton, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143778
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2010;23(1):15-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Mieczyslaw Szyszkowicz
Brian Rowe
Author Affiliation
Air Health Effects Research Section, Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. mietek_szyszkowicz@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2010;23(1):15-9
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollutants - toxicity
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Chest Pain - chemically induced
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Fatigue - chemically induced
Female
Humans
Humidity
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Distribution
Temperature
Young Adult
Abstract
Chest pain or weakness can be first signal of health problems. Many studies demonstrate that these conditions can be related to air pollution. This work uses time-series data to investigate the association.
This is a study of 68,714 emergency department (ED) visits for chest pain (ICD-9: 786) and of 66,092 ED visits for weakness (ICD-9: 780). The hierarchical method was applied to analyse the associations between daily counts of ED visits for chest pain and weakness (separately) and the levels of the air pollutants and meteorological variables. The counts of visits for all patients, males and females were analysed separately by whole period (I-XII), warm (IV-IX) and cold (X-III).
The results are presented in the form of the excess risks associated with an increase in the interquartile range (IQR) for the pollutant. Chest pain: 2.4% (95% CI: 1.0-3.9) for CO, females, I-XII; 3.8% (95% CI: 0.0-7.8) for NO(2), males, IV-IX; 4.5% (95% CI: 0.9-8.3) for O(3) (1-day lagged), males, IV-IX; 2.8% (95% CI: 0.5-5.2), for PM(10), males, X-III; 2.0% (95% CI: 0.0-4.0), for SO(2), females, X-III; 2.1% (95% CI: 0.2-4.0) for PM(2.5), all, X-III. Weakness: 2.1% (95% CI: 0.4-3.7) for CO (2-day lagged), males, X-III; 3.4% (95% CI: 1.0-5.9) for NO(2) (2-day lagged), males, X-III; 2.4% (95% CI: 0.9-3.9) for SO(2), females, I-XII; 4.6% (95% CI: 1.0-8.2) for O(3) (1-day lagged), females, IV-IX.
Obtained findings provide support for the hypothesis that ED visits for chest pain and weakness are associated with exposure to ambient air pollution.
PubMed ID
20442058 View in PubMed
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Air quality during the winter in Qu├ębec day-care centers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224262
Source
Am J Public Health. 1992 Mar;82(3):432-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1992
Author
S. Daneault
M. Beausoleil
K. Messing
Author Affiliation
Center for the Study of Biological Interactions between Health and Environment, Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada.
Source
Am J Public Health. 1992 Mar;82(3):432-4
Date
Mar-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution, Indoor - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Carbon Dioxide - analysis
Child Day Care Centers
Child, Preschool
Electric Power Supplies
Environmental monitoring
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Heating - methods - standards
Humans
Humidity
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Quebec
Temperature
Time Factors
Ventilation - methods - standards
Abstract
Over 90% of 91 day care centers in greater Montréal, Québec exceeded 1000 ppm of CO2 during January through April 1989. Four variables were independent positive predictors of CO2 levels: the density of children in the center; presence of electric heating; absence of a ventilation system; and building age. High levels of CO2 are associated with respiratory tract and other symptoms. Clear standards and inspection policies should be established for day care center air quality.
Notes
Cites: BMJ. 1989 Dec 2;299(6712):1388-902513974
Cites: J Occup Med. 1987 Jan;29(1):57-623546636
Cites: Scand J Soc Med Suppl. 1985;36:1-393866314
Cites: Environ Res. 1989 Oct;50(1):37-552792060
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1984 Dec 8;289(6458):1573-56439323
Cites: Rev Infect Dis. 1986 Jul-Aug;8(4):514-203529306
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1987 May;79(5):685-7003571762
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1985 Aug 10;291(6492):373-63926199
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1988 Sep;78(9):1175-73407814
PubMed ID
1536362 View in PubMed
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Airways inflammation and glucan in a rowhouse area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205318
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1998 Jun;157(6 Pt 1):1798-803
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
J. Thorn
R. Rylander
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1998 Jun;157(6 Pt 1):1798-803
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollution, Indoor - analysis
Allergens - immunology
Ascomycota
Blood Proteins - analysis
Bronchial Provocation Tests
C-Reactive Protein - analysis
Eosinophil Granule Proteins
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Glucans - analysis
Humans
Humidity
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Inflammation Mediators - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Peroxidase - blood
Residence Characteristics
Ribonucleases
Spirometry
Sweden
Vital Capacity
beta-Glucans
Abstract
A study was undertaken in a number of rowhouses, some of which had had previous problems related to dampness and water leakage. The aim of the study was to assess the relation between exposure to airborne (1--> 3)-beta-D-glucan, a cell-wall substance in molds, and airways inflammation. The study involved 75 houses with indoor (1--> 3)-beta-D-glucan levels ranging from 0 to 19 ng/m3. Of 170 invited tenants, 129 (76%) participated in the study. A questionnaire relating to symptoms was used, and measurements were made of lung function and airway responsiveness. Myeloperoxidase (MPO), eosinophilic cationic protein (ECP), and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured in serum. Atopy was determined with the Phadiatop test. The major findings were a relation between exposure to (1--> 3)- beta-D-glucan and an increased prevalence of atopy, a slightly increased amount of MPO, and a decrease in FEV1 over the number of years lived in the house. The results suggests the hypothesis that exposure to (1--> 3)-beta-D-glucan or molds indoors could be associated with signs of a non-specific inflammation.
PubMed ID
9620908 View in PubMed
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Allergy and respiratory health effects of dampness and dampness-related agents in schools and homes: a cross-sectional study in Danish pupils.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288350
Source
Indoor Air. 2016 12;26(6):880-891
Publication Type
Article
Date
12-2016
Author
G J Holst
A. Høst
G. Doekes
H W Meyer
A M Madsen
K B Plesner
T. Sigsgaard
Source
Indoor Air. 2016 12;26(6):880-891
Date
12-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air pollution, indoor
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Housing
Humans
Humidity - adverse effects
Hypersensitivity - etiology
Male
Respiratory Function Tests
Respiratory Tract Diseases - etiology
Schools
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Abstract
Little is known about the health effects of school-related indoor dampness and microbial exposures. In this study, we investigated dampness and dampness-related agents in both homes and schools and their association with allergy and respiratory health effects in 330 Danish pupils. Classroom dampness was identified based on technical inspection and bedroom dampness on parents' self-report. Classroom and bedroom dust was analyzed for seven microbial components. Skin prick testing determined atopic sensitization. Lung function was expressed as z-scores for forced expiratory volume in one-second (zFEV1 ), forced vital capacity (zFVC) and the ratio zFEV1 /zFVC using GLI-2012 prediction equations. The parents reported children's allergies, airway symptoms, and doctor-diagnosed asthma. High classroom dampness, but not bedroom dampness, was negatively associated with zFEV1 (ß-coef. -0.71; 95% CI -1.17 to -0.23) and zFVC (ß-coef. -0.52; 95% CI -0.98 to -0.06) and positively with wheezing (OR 8.09; 95% CI 1.49 to 43.97). No consistent findings were found between any individual microbial components or combination of microbial components and health outcomes. Among other indoor risk factors, environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) decreased zFEV1 (ß-coef. -0.22; 95% CI -0.42 to -0.02) and zFEV1 /zFVCratio (ß-coef. -0.26; 95% CI -0.44 to -0.07) and increased upper airway symptoms (OR 1.66; 95% CI 1.03-2.66). In conclusion, dampness in classrooms may have adverse respiratory health effects in pupils, but microbial agents responsible for this effect remain unknown.
PubMed ID
26643593 View in PubMed
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Ambient air pollution and daily emergency department visits for asthma in Edmonton, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157250
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2008;21(1):25-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Mieczyslaw Szyszkowicz
Author Affiliation
Air Health Effects Research Section, Environmental Health Science Bureau, Health Canada Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. mietek_szyszkowicz@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2008;21(1):25-30
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Alberta
Asthma
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Humans
Humidity
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Temperature
Abstract
As demonstrated by many studies, emergency department (ED) visits for asthma can be associated with air pollution exposures. The aim of this study was to examine and assess the potential relations between ED visits for asthma and the concentrations of ambient air pollutants.
Generalized linear mixed model was applied to study 62,563 ED visits for asthma (ICD-9: 493) in Edmonton, Canada. Two age groups, with 10 years of age as a separator, were considered by gender and season of the year: all (I-XII), warm (IV-IX) and cold (X-III).
The percentage increase in daily ED visits for asthma was 17.8% (95% CI: 7.1-29.5) and 13.8% (95% CI: 3.3-25.3) for females below 10 years of age, in the period of IV-IX, for current day and 1-day lagged exposure to ozone (O(3)), respectively. The percentage increase was 19.2% (95% CI: 11.4-27.6) for males below 10 years of age, in the period of IV-IX, for 2-day lagged exposure to nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)).
The findings provide support for the hypothesis that ED visits for asthma are associated with exposure to O(3). This study underlines the significant role of air pollutants as triggering asthma attacks.
PubMed ID
18468973 View in PubMed
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Amplitude modulation of sound from wind turbines under various meteorological conditions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264950
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2014 Jan;135(1):67-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Conny Larsson
Olof Öhlund
Source
J Acoust Soc Am. 2014 Jan;135(1):67-73
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustics
Atmospheric Pressure
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Humidity
Motion
Noise - adverse effects
Power Plants
Renewable Energy
Sound Spectrography
Sweden
Temperature
Time Factors
Wind
Abstract
Wind turbine (WT) sound annoys some people even though the sound levels are relatively low. This could be because of the amplitude modulated "swishing" characteristic of the turbine sound, which is not taken into account by standard procedures for measuring average sound levels. Studies of sound immission from WTs were conducted continually between 19 August 2011 and 19 August 2012 at two sites in Sweden. A method for quantifying the degree and strength of amplitude modulation (AM) is introduced here. The method reveals that AM at the immission points occur under specific meteorological conditions. For WT sound immission, the wind direction and sound speed gradient are crucial for the occurrence of AM. Interference between two or more WTs could probably enhance AM. The mechanisms by which WT sound is amplitude modulated are not fully understood.
PubMed ID
24437746 View in PubMed
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An approach to management of critical indoor air problems in school buildings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201320
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1999 Jun;107 Suppl 3:509-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
U. Haverinen
T. Husman
M. Toivola
J. Suonketo
M. Pentti
R. Lindberg
J. Leinonen
A. Hyvärinen
T. Meklin
A. Nevalainen
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology and Unit of Epidemiology, Kuopio, Finland. ulla.haverinen@ktl.fi
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1999 Jun;107 Suppl 3:509-14
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects - prevention & control
Child
Communication
Environmental health
Environmental Microbiology
Finland
Humans
Humidity - adverse effects - prevention & control
Questionnaires
Respiratory Tract Diseases - etiology
Schools
Abstract
This study was conducted in a school center that had been the focus of intense public concern over 2 years because of suspected mold and health problems. Because several attempts to find solutions to the problem within the community were not satisfactory, outside specialists were needed for support in solving the problem. The study group consisted of experts in civil engineering, indoor mycology, and epidemiology. The studies were conducted in close cooperation with the city administration. Structures at risk were opened, moisture and temperature were measured, and the causes of damage were analyzed. Microbial samples were taken from the air, surfaces, and materials. Health questionnaires were sent to the schoolchildren and personnel. Information on the measurements and their results was released regularly to school employees, students and their parents, and to the media. Repairs were designed on the basis of this information. Moisture damage was caused mainly by difficult moisture conditions at the building site, poor ventilation, and water leaks. Fungal genera (concentrations
Notes
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 1992 Dec 15;127(1-2):79-891480960
Cites: Eur Respir J. 1995 Jul;8(7):1155-607589401
Cites: Acta Paediatr. 1997 Nov;86(11):1181-79401510
Cites: Eur Respir J. 1997 Aug;10(8):1787-949272920
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 1996 Feb;22(1):5-138685674
PubMed ID
10423392 View in PubMed
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225 records – page 1 of 23.