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Adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder (frozen shoulder) produces bone loss in the affected humerus, but long-term bony recovery is good.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205412
Source
Bone. 1998 Jun;22(6):691-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
J. Leppälä
P. Kannus
H. Sievänen
M. Järvinen
I. Vuori
Author Affiliation
Accident and Trauma Research Center, UKK Institute for Health Promotion Research, Tampere, Finland.
Source
Bone. 1998 Jun;22(6):691-4
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Bone Density - physiology
Bone Remodeling - physiology
Bursitis - complications - physiopathology - radiography
Female
Finland
Forearm - radiography
Humans
Humerus - physiopathology - radiography
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - etiology
Questionnaires
Radius - radiography
Shoulder Joint
Ulna - radiography
Abstract
The objective of the study was to assess the short- and long-term effects of adhesive capsulitis (frozen shoulder) on the bone mineral density (BMD) of the affected extremity. BMD and clinical status of 22 patients (group A) with active-phase unilateral adhesive capsulitis and 31 patients (group B) with a previous adhesive capsulitis (average 9 years before the examination) were determined. BMD was measured from the proximal humerus, humeral shaft, radial shaft, ulnar shaft, and distal forearm of both upper extremities using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). In group A, the mean BMD of the affected extremity, as compared with that of the unaffected side, was significantly lower in the proximal humerus (-5.6%; p = 0.001) and humeral shaft (-3.0%; p = 0.008). The radial shaft, ulnar shaft, and distal forearm showed no significant side-to-side differences. In contrast, in group B, the affected-to-unaffected side BMD differences were small and statistically insignificant. Compared with the 31 patients in group B, the relative side-to-side BMD difference of the 22 patients with active-phase disease (group A) was significantly lower in the proximal humerus (-5.6% vs. -1.5%, p = 0.009). In the other sites, groups A and B showed no significant differences. In conclusion, this study indicates that adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder results in significant bone loss in the humerus of the affected extremity, but in the long term, capsulitis-induced bone loss shows good recovery.
PubMed ID
9626410 View in PubMed
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Age changes in the external dimensions of adult bone.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245795
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 1980 May;52(4):529-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1980
Author
S. Pfeiffer
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 1980 May;52(4):529-32
Date
May-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Bone Development
Humans
Humerus - anatomy & histology - growth & development
Middle Aged
Ontario
Abstract
Humeri from a large, ossuary-derived sample are used to demonstrate that considerable size variability is introduced to transverse skeletal measurements when young adults and older adults are pooled. Humeri from young adults (epiphyseal lines still visible, N approximately 25) are smaller in transverse dimensions than those of older adults (N approximately 300). Among left humeri, only shaft diameters demonstrate statistically significant differences. The right humeri, however, show statistically significant differences for six of the eight measurements. The increased size of the older adult humeri reflects the fact that appositional growth continues throughout adulthood. The more pronounced differences seen on the right side probably reflect developing dominance asymmetry. Recognition of this source of intrasample variability will influence the choice of skeletal measurements used for population comparisons and/or indicators of robusticity.
PubMed ID
7386613 View in PubMed
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Clinical variability of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy in Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216442
Source
Muscle Nerve Suppl. 1995;2:S85-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
V M Kazakov
D I Rudenko
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, I.P. Pavlov Medical Institute of St. Petersburg, Russia.
Source
Muscle Nerve Suppl. 1995;2:S85-95
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Face
Female
Genes, Dominant
Genetic Variation
Humans
Humerus
Male
Middle Aged
Muscular Dystrophies - genetics - physiopathology
Pedigree
Phenotype
Russia
Scapula
Abstract
One hundred forty-two patients (66 men and 76 women) from 20 autosomal-dominant pedigrees and 3 families including 5 "sporadic" cases were examined. A great similarity of clinical manifestations among those affected was noted. Clinical variability of phenotypes reflecting various phases of the disease and different expressions of the mutant gene were always within the limits of the identical final phenotype of the disease, namely the facio-scapulo-humero-peroneal-femoro (posterior group of the muscles)-gluteal (gluteus maximus). Thus, the clinically and genetically homogeneous group of patients with autosomal-dominant descending with a "jump" form of facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD), called facioscapuloperoneal dystrophy (FSPD), was examined. Among the observed cases we did not come across any having the autosomal-dominant gradually descending form of FSHD, called facioscapulolimb dystrophy (FSLD), in which the pelvic and proximal lower limb muscles get weak earlier than in the peroneal group (anterior tibial) muscles. We could not reveal the "pure" facioscapulohumeral phenotype of muscle weakness in 142 examined patients. A "pure" FSHD does not exist as a nosological entity. It represents only the syndrome which characterizes the initial phase of FSLD, but not of the FSPD. It is quite probable that FSPD and FSLD which may be differentiated clinically are two different diseases connected with the mutation of allelic or even different genes. Linkage studies in FSPD and FSLD mapping genes would confirm this data.
PubMed ID
7739632 View in PubMed
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Complications and survival after surgical treatment of 214 metastatic lesions of the humerus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130645
Source
J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 2012 Aug;21(8):1049-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Rikard Wedin
Bjarne H Hansen
Minna Laitinen
Clement Trovik
Olga Zaikova
Peter Bergh
Anders Kalén
Gunnar Schwarz-Lausten
Fredrik Vult von Steyern
Anders Walloe
Johnny Keller
Rüdiger J Weiss
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. rikard.wedin@karolinska.se
Source
J Shoulder Elbow Surg. 2012 Aug;21(8):1049-55
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Bone Nails
Bone Neoplasms - mortality - secondary - surgery
Bone Plates
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Disease-Free Survival
Female
Fracture Fixation, Internal - methods - mortality
Fractures, Spontaneous - mortality - radiography - surgery
Humans
Humeral Fractures - mortality - radiography - surgery
Humerus - pathology - surgery
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Neoplasm Invasiveness - pathology
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - mortality - pathology - surgery
Neoplasm Staging
Postoperative Complications - mortality - physiopathology - surgery
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prostheses and Implants
Registries
Reoperation
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Survival Analysis
Sweden
Abstract
The humerus is the second most common long-bone site of metastatic bone disease. We report complications, risk factors for failure, and survival of a large series of patients operated on for skeletal metastases of the humerus.
This study was based on 208 patients treated surgically for 214 metastatic lesions of the humerus. Reconstructions were achieved by intramedullary nails in 148, endoprostheses in 35, plate fixation in 21, and by other methods in 10.
The median age at surgery was 67 years (range, 29-87 years). Breast cancer was the primary tumor in 31%. The overall failure rate of the surgical reconstructions was 9%. The reoperation rate was 7% in the proximal humerus, 8% in the diaphysis, and 33% in the distal part of the bone. Among 36 operations involving an endoprosthesis, 2 were failures (6%) compared with 18 of 178 osteosynthetic devices (10%). In the osteosynthesis group, intramedullary nails failed in 7% and plate fixation failed in 22%. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that prostate cancer was associated with an increased risk of failure after surgery (hazard ratio, 7; P
PubMed ID
21982491 View in PubMed
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Cortical bone loss with age in three Native American populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature765
Source
American Journal of Physical Anthropology. 45:443-452.
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1976
Author
Ericksen, M.F.
Author Affiliation
George Washington University
Source
American Journal of Physical Anthropology. 45:443-452.
Date
Nov-1976
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Bone cortical thickness
Aging
Bone mineral loss
Adult
Age Factors
Environment
Female
Femur - anatomy & histology
Humans
Humerus - anatomy & histology
Indians, North American
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
North America
Osteoporosis - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Abstract
Age-related thinning of cortical bone was investigated in archaeological populations of Eskimos, Pueblos, and Arikaras. Medial-lateral cortical thickness was measured on radiographs of humerus and femur, and thickness of the anterior femoral cortex was measured directly on samples taken for histologic study. Maximum length of the bones was used to calculate indices of relative cortical thickness, in order to minimize differences due to body size and build. Bone loss in the humerus begins before middle age in all three populations and, except for Eskimo males, the same is true of the anterior femoral cortex. In general, overall female loss of cortical bone amounts to two or three times that of the males, and in the case of the humerus and the anterior cortex of the femur, this difference is evident by middle age. The weight-bearing femoral medial-lateral cortex shows less sexual difference but has the greatest number of statistically significant differences between populations and the greatest contrast between populations in pattern of loss with age. It appears that of the cortical regions studied this is the area upon which environmental factors have the greatest effect, whereas areas more subject to tensile stress, the humerus and anterior femoral cortex, are less affected by these factors.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 143.
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Daily number of fractures is associated with road temperature in an urban area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259894
Source
Dan Med J. 2014 Mar;61(3):A4794
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Christopher Jantzen
Henrik L Jørgensen
Morten T Thomsen
Troels Riis
Bo Sommer
Benn R Duus
Jes B Lauritzen
Source
Dan Med J. 2014 Mar;61(3):A4794
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ankle Fractures - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology
Hip Fractures - epidemiology
Humans
Humerus - injuries
Radius Fractures - epidemiology
Seasons
Temperature
Trauma Centers - statistics & numerical data
Urban Population
Abstract
Different factors related to winter are known to influence the fracture incidence, but little is known about the effect of road surface temperature. This study examines the association between road surface temperature and the daily number of fractures in an urban area during two winters.
Retrospective data collection was conducted on all patients treated at Bispebjerg Hospital, Denmark, for a humeral, ankle, distal radius or hip fracture during the periods October to April 2009/2010 and 2010/2011. Patients were grouped according to age into the following categories: 60 years. Data on road surface temperature (Tp.) were obtained from The Danish Road Directorate and grouped into the following categories: Days with Tp. > 0 °C, Tp. -5 °C, Tp. 30 years experienced a significant increase.
Decreasing road temperature results in increased numbers of all fractures except hip fractures. Low temperatures is a risk factor for patients > 30 years and a protective factor for patients
PubMed ID
24814914 View in PubMed
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Description and classification of degenerative bone changes in the distal joint surfaces of the humerus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1862
Source
American Journal of Physical Anthropology. 1968 Mar;28(2):139-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1968
Author
Ortner, D.J.
Author Affiliation
Smithsonian Institution
Source
American Journal of Physical Anthropology. 1968 Mar;28(2):139-55
Date
Mar-1968
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Degenerative joint disease
Stress, mechanical
Anthropology, Physical
Biomechanical Phenomena
Bone Resorption - classification - pathology
Elbow - pathology - physiology
Humans
Humerus - pathology
Hypertrophy
Indians, South American
Inuits
Osteogenesis Imperfecta - classification - pathology
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 192.
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Dietary xylitol supplementation prevents osteoporotic changes in streptozotocin-diabetic rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10893
Source
Metabolism. 1998 May;47(5):578-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1998
Author
P T Mattila
M L Knuuttila
M J Svanberg
Author Affiliation
Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Metabolism. 1998 May;47(5):578-83
Date
May-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Blood Glucose - drug effects - metabolism
Bone Density - drug effects
Bone and Bones - drug effects - pathology
Compressive Strength - drug effects
Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental - chemically induced - drug therapy - physiopathology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - chemically induced - drug therapy - physiopathology
Dietary Supplements
Elasticity - drug effects
Elements
Energy Intake - drug effects - physiology
Femur Neck - drug effects - physiology
Humerus - drug effects
Insulin - blood
Male
Minerals
Osteoporosis - drug therapy - physiopathology - prevention & control
Physical Endurance - drug effects
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Streptozocin
Stress, mechanical
Tibia - drug effects
Torsion - physiopathology
Weight Gain - drug effects - physiology
Xylitol - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Abstract
The effects of 10% and 20% dietary xylitol supplementation on the biomechanical properties, trabeculation, and mineral content of long bones were studied in streptozotocin-diabetic rats. Forty 3-month-old male Wistar rats were divided randomly into four groups of 10. Rats in three groups were administered a single injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg body weight) to induce type I diabetes, while animals in the fourth group were given a sham injection of physiological saline. The sham-injected group and one of the streptozotocin-diabetic groups were fed the basal diet, while the two diabetic groups were fed the same diet supplemented with 10% and 20% xylitol (wt/wt). After 3 months, the rats were killed and the long bones were prepared for analysis. The 10% and 20% dietary xylitol supplementation significantly prevented the type I diabetes-induced decrease in the mechanical stress resistance of the tibia in the three-point bending test, the shear stress of the femur in the torsion test, and the stress resistance of the femoral neck in the loading test. No statistically significant differences were found between any groups in the values for strain or Young's modulus in the three-point bending test, or in the values for the shear modulus of elasticity in the torsion test. These findings indicate that dietary xylitol protects against the weakening of the bone strength properties of both cortical and trabecular bone without affecting the elastic-plastic properties. Supplementation with 10% and 20% dietary xylitol significantly prevented the type I diabetes-induced decrease of humeral ash weight and tibial density. Histomorphometric data for the secondary spongiosa of the proximal tibia showed that 10% and 20% dietary xylitol supplementation also significantly prevented the type I diabetes-induced loss of trabecular bone volume. In conclusion, dietary xylitol supplementation protects against the weakening of bone biomechanical properties in streptozotocin-diabetic rats. This is related to the preserved bone mineral content and preserved trabecular bone volume.
PubMed ID
9591750 View in PubMed
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Does the upward migration index predict function and quality of life in arthroscopic rotator cuff repair?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142358
Source
Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2010 Nov;468(11):3063-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Peter C Lapner
Yingua Su
David Simon
Salah El-Fatori
Emilio Lopez-Vidriero
Author Affiliation
Division of Orthopedics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa Hospital, General Campus, 501 Smyth Road, CCW 1648, Box 502, Ottawa, ON, K1H 8L6, Canada. plapner@toh.on.ca
Source
Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2010 Nov;468(11):3063-9
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arthroscopy
Disability Evaluation
Female
Humans
Humerus - pathology - physiopathology - surgery
Linear Models
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle strength
Ontario
Quality of Life
Range of Motion, Articular
Recovery of Function
Retrospective Studies
Rotator Cuff - injuries - physiopathology - surgery
Severity of Illness Index
Shoulder Joint - physiopathology - surgery
Tendon Injuries - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology - surgery
Tenodesis
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Although upward humeral head migration is a well-recognized phenomenon in patients with tears of the cuff, it is unclear whether it relates to patient function after cuff repair. The upward migration index (UMI) assesses proximal migration of the humeral head while controlling for patients' bony morphologic features.
We asked whether functional and quality-of-life (QOL) improvement occurs longitudinally in patients with low, moderate, or high degrees of proximal humeral migration after arthroscopic cuff repair and whether differences occur between groups.
We retrospectively reviewed 118 patients with full-thickness tears treated by arthroscopic cuff repair. Patients were divided into three groups depending on the severity of preoperative proximal humeral migration seen on MRI. We determined function using two functional scores and the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index (a QOL index). Evaluations were performed preoperatively and 6 and 12 months postoperatively. A general linear model analysis controlled for patient characteristics, including the UMI, to determine their effects on functional and QOL scores.
Function and QOL improved after surgery in all three groups. The UMI did not correlate with final functional or QOL scores. Six-month functional and QOL scores correlated with final scores. The best predictor of final strength was initial strength.
Preoperative UMI did not correlate with functional or QOL improvements after surgery. The data suggest substantial proximal migration of the humeral head, as measured by the UMI, should not be considered a contraindication to arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20607465 View in PubMed
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42 records – page 1 of 5.