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Adaptive behavior in stressful situations and stroke incidence in hypertensive men: results from prospective cohort study "men born in 1914" in Malmö, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193833
Source
Stroke. 2001 Aug;32(8):1712-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
L. André-Petersson
G. Engström
B. Hagberg
L. Janzon
G. Steen
Author Affiliation
Division of Epidemiology, Department of Community Medicine, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. Lena.Andre-Petersson@psychology.lu.ses
Source
Stroke. 2001 Aug;32(8):1712-20
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological - classification
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Disease-Free Survival
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Neuropsychological Tests
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - psychology
Stroke - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Although hypertension is a major risk factor for stroke, many hypertensive persons remain healthy. The aim of the present study was to analyze whether adaptation in a stressful situation was associated with the incidence of stroke in hypertensive men.
Two hundred thirty-eight hypertensive men were followed from baseline in 1982/1983 until first stroke, death, or December 31, 1996. Adaptation to stress was studied with the serial Color-Word Test. In the Regression dimension, 4 patterns of adaptation could be distinguished according to mastering of the test. Successful mastering of the test was shown in stabilized patterns, increasing difficulty in cumulative patterns, fluctuating difficulty in dissociative patterns, and fluctuating difficulty that increased during testing in cumulative-dissociative patterns. The patterns were compared regarding stroke incidence.
Forty-three men experienced a stroke during follow-up. Stroke rates per 1000 person-years were 12.6 for men with stabilized patterns, 14.3 for men with cumulative patterns, 16.2 for men with dissociative patterns, and 31.2 for men with cumulative-dissociative patterns. Multivariate analysis, adjusted for relevant cerebrovascular risk factors, showed that the cumulative-dissociative pattern of the Regression dimension was associated with an increased risk of stroke during follow-up (relative risk 3.00, 95% CI 1.32 to 6.81).
The specific behavior pattern, characterized by the greatest difficulties in managing the test, was associated with incidence of stroke in hypertensive men. One interpretation is that hypertensive men who chronically fail to find successful strategies in stressful situations are vulnerable to the damaging effects of stress and thereby at an increased risk of a future stroke.
PubMed ID
11486095 View in PubMed
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Asthma but not smoking-related airflow limitation is associated with a high fat diet in men: results from the population study "Men born in 1914", Malmö, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11276
Source
Monaldi Arch Chest Dis. 1996 Feb;51(1):16-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1996
Author
K. Ström
L. Janzon
I. Mattisson
H E Rosberg
M. Arborelius
Author Affiliation
Dept of Lung Medicine, Central Hospital Karlskrona, Sweden.
Source
Monaldi Arch Chest Dis. 1996 Feb;51(1):16-21
Date
Feb-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Confidence Intervals
Data Collection
Dietary Fats - adverse effects
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Prospective Studies
Pulmonary Ventilation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Function Tests
Risk factors
Sampling Studies
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate whether there is an association between asthma and the intake of food with pro-oxidant or antioxidant activity (fat, alcohol, iron, zinc, and vitamins A and C), and to analyse whether any such association is specific to asthma or is found in airflow limitation in general. This study deals with 478 men, who were randomly selected from all the men born in Malmö in 1914. They were investigated using spirometry and their medical, occupational and dietary history was recorded in 1982-1983, at the age of 68 yrs, as part of the cohort study "Men born in 1914". Asthma was defined as a past or present physician's or nurse's diagnosis of asthma and airflow limitation was defined as a forced expiratory volume in one second/vital capacity ratio (FEV1/VC) of less than 70%. The relative risk of having asthma or airflow limitation as related to dietary intake at the age of 68 yrs was analysed after adjustments for smoking history and body mass index. Asthma was reported in 21 men and was not related to smoking history. Asthma was more common in men with a high fat intake (relative risk of asthma 1.74 for a 10% increase in fat intake, 95% confidence interval for the relative risk 1.13-2.68). The consumption of alcohol was higher for current smokers than ex-smokers and nonsmokers, and the intake of carbohydrates, vitamin C and iron was lower. Airflow limitation without asthma was present in 156 men and was related to smoking but not to dietary intake. Men with asthma had a significantly higher intake of fat than men without asthma. This difference appeared to be specific to asthma and was not found in airflow limitation in general.
PubMed ID
8901315 View in PubMed
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Biased risk factor assessment in prospective studies of peripheral arterial disease due to change in exposure and selective mortality of high-risk individuals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67642
Source
J Cardiovasc Risk. 1996 Dec;3(6):523-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
M. Ogren
B. Hedblad
L. Janzon
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
J Cardiovasc Risk. 1996 Dec;3(6):523-8
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Arteries
Bias (epidemiology)
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - complications
Hypertension - complications
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Peripheral Vascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Our aim was to assess whether risk factor assessment in prospective studies of peripheral disease (PAD) might be biased by change in exposure and selective mortality of individuals at high risk. METHODS: The cohort 'Men born in 1914' has been followed since the baseline examination 1969. PAD, (i.e. ankle-brachial pressure index
PubMed ID
9100088 View in PubMed
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Cardiac arrhythmias and stroke: increased risk in men with high frequency of atrial ectopic beats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54147
Source
Stroke. 2000 Dec;31(12):2925-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2000
Author
G. Engström
B. Hedblad
S. Juul-Möller
P. Tydén
L. Janzon
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Malmö University Hospital (Sweden). Gunnar.Engstrom@smi.mas.lu.se
Source
Stroke. 2000 Dec;31(12):2925-9
Date
Dec-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Arrhythmia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Atrial Premature Complexes - diagnosis - epidemiology
Cause of Death
Cerebrovascular Accident - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Comorbidity
Drug Resistance, Multiple
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Prospective Studies
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sampling Studies
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: With the exception of atrial fibrillation (AF), little scientific attention has been given the associations between cardiac arrhythmias and incidence of stroke. We sought to study whether atrial and ventricular arrhythmias assessed during a 24-hour ambulatory ECG registration are associated with incidence of stroke. METHODS: The population-based cohort "Men Born in 1914" was examined with 24-hour ambulatory ECG registrations at 68 years of age. Four hundred two men without previous myocardial infarction or stroke were included, and 236 of them had hypertension (>/=160/95 mm Hg or treatment). Fourteen-year rates of stroke (fatal and nonfatal) and all-cause mortality were updated from national and regional registers. Frequent or complex ventricular arrhythmias was defined as Lown class 2 to 5. A high frequency of atrial ectopic beats (AEB) was defined as the fifth quintile (ie, >/=218 AEB per 24 hours). RESULTS: Fifty-eight men suffered a first stroke during the follow-up. Stroke rates (per 1000 person-years) among men with AF (n=14), with frequent AEB (n=77), and without AF or frequent AEB (n=311) were 34.5, 19.5, and 11.6, respectively. The corresponding values among men with hypertension were 40.7, 32.3, and 14.7, respectively. Frequent AEB (compared with absence of AF and frequent AEB) was significantly associated with stroke among all men (relative risk=1.9; 95% CI, 1.02 to 3.4; P:=0.04) and among hypertensive men (relative risk=2.5; 95% CI, 1.3 to 4.8; P:=0.009) after adjustments for potential confounders. The increased stroke rates among men with Lown class 2 to 5 did not reach statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS: A high frequency of AEB is associated with an increased incidence of stroke.
Notes
Comment In: Stroke. 2001 Jun;32(6):1443-811387515
PubMed ID
11108750 View in PubMed
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Comparison of different procedures to identify probable cases of myocardial infarction and stroke in two Swedish prospective cohort studies using local and national routine registers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54072
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2000 Mar;16(3):235-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
J. Merlo
U. Lindblad
H. Pessah-Rasmussen
B. Hedblad
J. Rastam
S O Isacsson
L. Janzon
L. Råstam
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Lund, University, Malmö University Hospital, Sweden. juan.merlo@smi.mas.lu.se
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2000 Mar;16(3):235-43
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cerebrovascular accident - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In prospective cohort studies, person-time time is calculated from baseline until the first definite event occurs or until censoring. A way to correctly identify and date definite events when only routine registers are available is to retrieve all hospital discharge notes and death certificates with a diagnosis of probable event and perform a consecutive revision. It is important to detect all possible hospital stays as they may contain useful information for the revision study. Furthermore, loss to follow-up can be avoided by extending the retrieval outside the specific geographical area where the cohort was defined. The aims of this study were (i) to describe a comprehensive retrieval of probable myocardial infarctions (diagnosis with International Classification of Diseases 8th and 9th revisions codes 410-414) or stroke (codes 430-438), (ii) to quantify the relative efficiency of different local and national routine registers or their combination compared with the use of all available registers together, and (iii) to audit local and national registers by comparing their outcome at the county level. The study was performed in two prospective cohorts studies i.e., 'Men-born-1914' (n = 500) from Skåne (period 1982-1993), and Skara-1 (n = 683) from Skaraborg (period 1988-1994.). All available routine registers were linked to the cohorts. The use of all available routine registers improved retrieval of both individual and hospital stays with a discharge diagnosis of probable event and gave an enhanced basis for a future validation study. Local registers were not completely covered by the national register, but the accessible combination of national inpatient and mortality registers was an efficient alternative.
PubMed ID
10870938 View in PubMed
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Factors influencing participation in health surveys. Results from prospective population study 'Men born in 1914' in Malmö, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68018
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1986 Jun;40(2):174-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1986
Author
L. Janzon
B S Hanson
S O Isacsson
S E Lindell
B. Steen
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1986 Jun;40(2):174-7
Date
Jun-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcoholism
Attitude to Health
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Marriage
Prospective Studies
Smoking
Sweden
Abstract
Base line data together with data in public registers and a structured phone interview of 94 of the 121 non-attenders was used for an assessment of factors influencing participation in the prospective population study 'Men born in 1914' in Malmö, Sweden. The overall attendance rate was 80.5% but varied among areas in the city from 27% to 100%. The lower participation rate among single men remained, when correcting for social class, significant only for single men in social class III. Men who did not feel well and/or had been admitted to hospital during the last 12 months had a lower participation rate. A negative attitude towards health surveys in general was the most common reason for non-participation. The phone interview turned out to be a feasible method to reach non-attenders to assess whether the sample was representative of the population and to learn more about reasons for non-participation.
PubMed ID
3746180 View in PubMed
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Food patterns and components of the metabolic syndrome in men and women: a cross-sectional study within the Malmö Diet and Cancer cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19412
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Dec 15;154(12):1150-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2001
Author
E. Wirfält
B. Hedblad
B. Gullberg
I. Mattisson
C. Andrén
U. Rosander
L. Janzon
G. Berglund
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Orthopedics and Surgery, Lund University, University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. elisabet.wirfalt@smi.mas.lu.se
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Dec 15;154(12):1150-9
Date
Dec-15-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - anatomy & histology
Aged
Anthropometry
Blood pressure
Cluster analysis
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Hyperlipidemia
Insulin Resistance
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Recall
Metabolic Syndrome X
Middle Aged
Obesity - metabolism - physiopathology
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Characteristics
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This study examined the relations between food patterns and five components of the metabolic syndrome in a sample of Swedish men (n = 2,040) and women (n = 2,959) aged 45-68 years who joined the Malmö Diet and Cancer study from November 1991 to February 1994. Baseline examinations included an interview-administered diet history, a self-administered questionnaire, blood pressure and anthropologic measurements, and blood samples donated after an overnight fast. Cluster analysis identified six food patterns for which 43 food group variables were used. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the risk of each component (hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and central obesity) and food patterns, controlling for potential confounders. The study demonstrated relations, independent of specific nutrients, between food patterns and hyperglycemia and central obesity in men and hyperinsulinemia in women. Food patterns dominated by fiber bread provided favorable effects, while food patterns high in refined bread or in cheese, cake, and alcoholic beverages contributed adverse effects. In women, food patterns dominated by milk-fat-based spread showed protective relations with hyperinsulinemia. Relations between risk factors and food patterns may partly depend on gender differences in metabolism or food consumption and on variations in confounders across food patterns.
PubMed ID
11744521 View in PubMed
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Fruit and vegetable consumption in relation to risk factors for cancer: a report from the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10382
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2000 Sep;3(3):263-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2000
Author
P. Wallström
E. Wirfält
L. Janzon
I. Mattisson
S. Elmstâhl
U. Johansson
G. Berglund
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, SE-205 02, Malmö, Sweden. peter.wallstrom@smi.mas.lu.se
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2000 Sep;3(3):263-71
Date
Sep-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Fruit
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine the associations between the consumption of fruit and vegetables and other markers of cancer risk. DESIGN: A cross-sectional survey within the population-based prospective Malmö Diet and Cancer (MDC) Study. Information on food habits was collected through the modified diet history method designed and validated for the MDC Study. Data on smoking and alcohol habits, leisure time physical activity, birth country, education, socioeconomic status and cohabitation status were collected through a questionnaire. SETTING: Malmö, the third largest city in Sweden. SUBJECTS: All subjects who entered the MDC Study during winter 1991 to summer 1994 (men and women living in Malmö, aged between 46 and 68 years), with a total of 15 173. RESULTS: Women consumed more fruit and vegetables than men. Low consumption of both fruits and vegetables was associated with unfavourable nutrient profiles: higher percentage of energy from fat and lower intakes of antioxidant nutrients and dietary fibre. Low consumption was also associated with smoking, low leisure time physical activity, low education and being born in Sweden. High age was associated with low vegetable consumption in both genders. CONCLUSION: This study indicates that several established risk markers and risk factors of cancer may be independently associated with low fruit and vegetable consumption. The findings suggest that the adverse effects of factors such as smoking, low physical activity and a high-fat diet could partly be explained by low consumption of fruit or vegetables. The implied health benefits of a low or moderate alcohol consumption may be similarly confounded by high consumption of fruit or vegetables.
PubMed ID
10979146 View in PubMed
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Hypertension and ST segment depression during ambulatory electrocardiographic recording. Results from the prospective population study 'men born in 1914' from Malmö, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46608
Source
Hypertension. 1992 Jul;20(1):32-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1992
Author
B. Hedblad
L. Janzon
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Lund University, Malmö General Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Hypertension. 1992 Jul;20(1):32-7
Date
Jul-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Blood pressure
Cohort Studies
Coronary Disease - complications
Electrocardiography, Ambulatory
Follow-Up Studies
Heart - physiopathology
Humans
Hypertension - complications - physiopathology
Male
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
The aim of this study in 341 men (aged 68 years) without history of ischemic heart disease was to study the relation between hypertension and silent ischemic-type ST segment depression during ambulatory long-term electrocardiographic recording and to assess the influence between these two variables on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality rates. Seventy-nine men (23%) demonstrated one or more episodes of silent ischemic ST segment depression. One hundred and sixty-seven men (49%) were considered to have hypertension (i.e., they had a diastolic blood pressure of 95 mm Hg or greater or were treated with antihypertensive therapy). Forty-nine (72%) of the 68 treated hypertensive subjects were classified as uncontrolled (i.e., their diastolic blood pressure was 95 mm Hg or greater). The occurrence of ischemic ST depression was higher in hypertensive men (28%) than in normotensive men (19%). The highest incidence of ischemic ST depression (41%) was observed in treated hypertensive men with inadequate blood pressure control. Cardiac event rate during a 53-month follow-up was 6.6% in hypertensive men and 4.6% in normotensive men. Uncontrolled treated hypertensive men had a higher event rate (14%) than hypertensive men overall. Hypertensive men with inadequate blood pressure control and who demonstrated ST segment depression had the highest event rate (25%).
PubMed ID
1618550 View in PubMed
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Hypertensive men who exercise regularly have lower rate of cardiovascular mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49970
Source
J Hypertens. 1999 Jun;17(6):737-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1999
Author
G. Engström
B. Hedblad
L. Janzon
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Sweden. Gunnar.Engstrom@smi.mas.lu.se
Source
J Hypertens. 1999 Jun;17(6):737-42
Date
Jun-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood pressure
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - prevention & control
Case-Control Studies
Cause of Death
Comparative Study
Exercise
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - complications
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Regular exercise has been associated in prospective studies with reduced incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and death. OBJECTIVE: To assess in a cohort study whether there is a similar protective effect of regular exercise among hypertensive individuals. DESIGN: Population-based prospective cohort study. Spare time physical activity was assessed by structured interview. SETTING: Malmo, Sweden. PARTICIPANTS: Healthy men (n = 642) born in 1914. A baseline examination took place in 1969-1970. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: All-cause and cardiovascular mortality rates during 25 years of follow-up in relation to blood pressure and other risk factors for atherosclerosis. RESULTS: One-hundred (16%) men reported vigorous spare time physical activity. In this group, 31 had hypertension (blood pressure >160/95 mm Hg or treatment for hypertension), 47 were smokers and 39 had hyperlipidaemia. Among the 173 men with hypertension, vigorous physical activity was associated with markedly reduced rates of all-cause (17.3 versus 40.0 deaths per 1000 person-years) and cardiovascular mortality (6.3 versus 21.0 deaths per 1000 person-years). The risk reductions associated with exercise remained statistically significant after adjustment for smoking, systolic blood pressure and antihypertensive therapy. The relative risk was 0.43 (confidence interval 0.22-0.82) for total mortality and 0.33 (confidence interval 0.11 -0.94) for CVD mortality. CONCLUSION: People who regularly perform physical activity constitute a heterogeneous group with regard to their exposure to known cardiovascular risk factors. Our results support the view that regular physical activity is associated with a reduced incidence of cardiovascular disease and death and suggest that this protective effect may be enhanced among hypertensive individuals.
PubMed ID
10459869 View in PubMed
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32 records – page 1 of 4.