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2-h postchallenge plasma glucose predicts cardiovascular events in patients with myocardial infarction without known diabetes mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121853
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2012;11:93
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Loghman Henareh
Stefan Agewall
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. loghman.henareh@karolinska.se
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2012;11:93
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angina, Unstable - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Biological Markers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Recurrence
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Stroke - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
The incidence of cardiovascular events remains high in patients with myocardial infarction (MI) despite advances in current therapies. New and better methods for identifying patients at high risk of recurrent cardiovascular (CV) events are needed. This study aimed to analyze the predictive value of an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in patients with acute myocardial infarction without known diabetes mellitus (DM).
The prospective cohort study consisted of 123 men and women aged between 31-80 years who had suffered a previous MI 3-12 months before the examinations. The exclusion criteria were known diabetes mellitus. Patients were followed up over 6.03???1.36 years for CV death, recurrent MI, stroke and unstable angina pectoris. A standard OGTT was performed at baseline.
2-h plasma glucose (HR, 1.27, 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.62; P?
Notes
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PubMed ID
22873202 View in PubMed
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[3-year follow-up of a child psychiatric cohort]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78052
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2007 Apr 2;169(14):1317-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2-2007
Author
Bilenberg Niels
Pedersen Dorthe
Author Affiliation
Odense Universitetshospital, Det Børne- og Ungdomspsykiatriske Hus. niels.bilenberg@ouh.fyns-amt.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2007 Apr 2;169(14):1317-21
Date
Apr-2-2007
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - classification - diagnosis - therapy
Parents
Prognosis
Questionnaires
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Publications on prospective follow-up studies of Danish child psychiatric cohorts are scarce. Such studies are necessary in order to be able to inform patients about the natural course and prognosis of child psychiatric disorders. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Baseline data is obtained from 110 children, ie. 91 boys and 19 girls (4-13 years old) assessed in 2 child and adolescent psychiatric outpatient clinics in Denmark. As part of the baseline assessment, the children were clinically diagnosed and covered most of the child psychopathological spectrum. Baseline information included demographic data, assessment of symptom-load by means of The Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and a global function score. The children in the cohort were assessed once a year using the CBCL and the Teachers Report Form (TRF). RESULTS: The symptom-load is declining, although still high during the follow-up period. The decline in total behaviour problem scores was greater in the group of children diagnosed with emotional and behavioural disorders compared to those with neuropsychiatric disorders (Attention deficits and Autism spectrum disorders). CONCLUSION: In spite of the relatively small sample size, this follow-up study identifies important issues of prognostic value in this clinical child psychiatric outpatient population. The material may be useful as a 'treatment as usual' group in future clinical outcome studies.
PubMed ID
17437695 View in PubMed
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A 3-year follow-up of headache diagnoses and symptoms in Swedish schoolchildren.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81846
Source
Cephalalgia. 2006 Jul;26(7):809-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Laurell K.
Larsson B.
Mattsson P.
Eeg-Olofsson O.
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. katarina.laurell@akademiska.se
Source
Cephalalgia. 2006 Jul;26(7):809-15
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Migraine Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prognosis
Questionnaires
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Students - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Tension-Type Headache - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
Information is sparse concerning the incidence and prognosis of headache in children from the general population, especially of tension-type headache. In this study, headache diagnoses and symptoms were reassessed in 122 out of 130 schoolchildren after 3 years. Nearly 80% of those with headache at first evaluation still reported headache at follow-up. Although the likelihood of experiencing the same headache diagnosis and symptoms was high, about one-fifth of children with tension-type headache developed migraine and vice versa. Female gender predicted migraine and frequent headache episodes predicted overall headache at follow-up. The estimated average annual incidence was 81 and 65 per 1000 children, for tension-type headache and migraine, respectively. We conclude that there is a considerable risk of developing and maintaining headache during childhood. Headache diagnoses should be reassessed regularly and treatment adjusted. Girls and children with frequent headache have a poorer prognosis and therefore intervention is particularly important in these groups.
PubMed ID
16776695 View in PubMed
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[4 years after Chernobyl: medical repercussions]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25355
Source
Bull Cancer. 1990;77(5):419-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
D. Hubert
Source
Bull Cancer. 1990;77(5):419-28
Date
1990
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Abortion, Habitual - epidemiology
Blood Cell Count
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Decontamination - methods
Diarrhea - etiology
English Abstract
Europe
Female
Humans
Male
Nuclear Reactors
Pregnancy
Prognosis
Psychophysiologic Disorders - etiology
Pulmonary Fibrosis - etiology
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Injuries - complications - epidemiology - therapy
Skin - radiation effects
Triage
Ukraine
Abstract
The nuclear accident at Chernobyl accounted for an acute radiation syndrome in 237 persons on the site. Triage was the initial problem and was carried out according to clinical and biological criteria; evaluating the doses received was based on these criteria. Thirty one persons died and only 1 survived a dose higher than 6 Gy. Skin radiation burns which were due to inadequate decontamination, greatly worsened prognosis. The results of 13 bone marrow transplantations were disappointing, with only 2 survivors. Some time after the accident, these severely irradiated patients are mainly suffering from psychosomatic disorders, in the USSR, some areas have been significantly contaminated and several measures were taken to mitigate the impact on population: evacuating 135,000 persons, distributing prophylactic iodine, establishing standards and controls on foodstuff. Radiation phobia syndrome which developed in many persons, is the only sanitary effect noticed up to now. Finally, in Europe, there was only an increase in induced abortions and this was totally unwarranted. If we consider the risk of radiation induced cancer, an effect might not be demonstrated.
PubMed ID
2205311 View in PubMed
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5-year outcome after transcatheter aortic valve implantation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117830
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2013 Jan 29;61(4):413-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-29-2013
Author
Stefan Toggweiler
Karin H Humphries
May Lee
Ronald K Binder
Robert R Moss
Melanie Freeman
Jian Ye
Anson Cheung
David A Wood
John G Webb
Author Affiliation
St. Paul's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2013 Jan 29;61(4):413-9
Date
Jan-29-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Valve - physiopathology - surgery - ultrasonography
Aortic Valve Stenosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - surgery
Canada - epidemiology
Equipment Failure Analysis - statistics & numerical data
Female
Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation - adverse effects - methods - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Postoperative Period
Prognosis
Prosthesis Design
Prosthesis Failure - etiology
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Survival Rate
Survivors - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate the 5-year outcome following transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI).
Little is known about long-term outcomes following TAVI.
The 5-year outcomes following successful TAVI with a balloon-expandable valve were evaluated in 88 patients. Patients who died within 30 days after TAVI were excluded.
Mean aortic valve gradient decreased from 46 ± 18 mm Hg to 10 ± 4.5 mm Hg after TAVI and 11.8 ± 5.7 mm Hg at 5 years (p for post-TAVI trend = 0.06). Mean aortic valve area increased from 0.62 ± 0.17 cm(2) to 1.67 ± 0.41 cm(2) after TAVI and 1.40 ± 0.25 cm(2) at 5 years (p for post-TAVI trend
PubMed ID
23265333 View in PubMed
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A 5-year prospective population-based study of juvenile chronic arthritis: onset, disease process, and outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124008
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2012 Oct;41(5):379-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
L. Bertilsson
B. Andersson-Gäre
A. Fasth
H. Forsblad-d'Elia
Author Affiliation
Department of Rheumatology and Inflammation Research, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. lennart.bertilsson2@comhem.se
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2012 Oct;41(5):379-82
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age of Onset
Arthritis, Juvenile - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Child
Disease Progression
Female
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Prevalence
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Sweden
Uveitis - diagnosis - etiology - physiopathology
Abstract
To investigate, in a population-based cohort of patients with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA), onset characteristics, progression, outcome, and prognostic factors longitudinally for 5 years.
This cohort consisted of 132 incidence cases identified between 1984 and 1986 in southwestern Sweden followed for 5 years with annual reports of subgroup, joint assessment, disease activity, eye examinations, laboratory measurements, and medication. At the 5-year follow-up, the Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (Child-HAQ) was evaluated. European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) criteria for diagnosis and disease activity were used.
During the 5 years only four patients were lost to follow-up, 34% changed subgroup and 8% developed uveitis. At the 5-year follow-up the disease was active in 12% of the patients, stable in 28%, inactive in 25%, and in remission in 34%. Among those examined, 24% had radiological changes, of whom half had advanced changes. The Child-HAQ median score at the 5-year follow-up was 0.13 (range 0.0-1.9). The number of involved joints at inclusion correlated positively with active disease at the 5-year follow-up. Age at disease onset, the number of involved joints, and the number of joints with arthritis correlated positively with continuous disease and Child-HAQ score. CONCLUSION. Our study shows a diverse disease course during the first 5 years of JCA where one-third changed subgroup and two-thirds did not reach remission. Age of disease onset, the number of involved joints, and the number of joints with arthritis at inclusion were associated with poor outcome at the 5-year follow-up.
PubMed ID
22639832 View in PubMed
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[6-year trial of a program for predicting the potential occurrence of myocardial infarct].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234833
Source
Kardiologiia. 1987 Sep;27(9):43-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1987
Author
E Sh Khalfen
I L Shvarts
Source
Kardiologiia. 1987 Sep;27(9):43-7
Date
Sep-1987
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology
Prognosis
Risk factors
Russia
Sex Factors
Software
Urban Population
Abstract
A six-year prospective study of 3775 individuals, first examined in 1978, using an original mathematical program of myocardial infarction risk prognosis, is reported. The program is based on an integral assessment of 19 risk factors, each having 4 degrees of severity. The subjects were allocated to one of 3 groups, depending on the prognostic risk score. In the low coronary risk group (2068 people), there was 1 (0.048%) myocardial infarction over 6 years. There were 12 (0.76%) infarctions in the medium risk group (1569 people), and 62 (44.92%) infarctions in the high risk group (138 people). Therefore, the program is capable of identifying a limited (about 4%) population that is going to develop 80% of all myocardial infarctions within the next 5 or 6 years.
PubMed ID
2961917 View in PubMed
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A 7-year follow-up of multidisciplinary rehabilitation among chronic neck and back pain patients. Is sick leave outcome dependent on psychologically derived patient groups?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149098
Source
Eur J Pain. 2010 Apr;14(4):426-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Gunnar Bergström
Cecilia Bergström
Jan Hagberg
Lennart Bodin
Irene Jensen
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Division of Intervention and Implementation Research, Department of Public Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Pain. 2010 Apr;14(4):426-33
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Back Pain - classification - psychology - rehabilitation
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Costs and Cost Analysis
Disability Evaluation
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Income
Male
Middle Aged
Neck Pain - classification - psychology - rehabilitation
Pain Measurement
Patient care team
Pensions
Prognosis
Risk
Sick Leave - economics - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
A valid method for classifying chronic pain patients into more homogenous groups could be useful for treatment planning, that is, which treatment is effective for which patient, and as a marker when evaluating treatment outcome. One instrument that has been used to derive subgroups of patients is the Multidimensional Pain Inventory (MPI). The primary aim of this study was to evaluate a classification method based on the Swedish version of the MPI, the MPI-S, to predict sick leave among chronic neck and back pain patients for a period of 7 years after vocational rehabilitation. As hypothesized, dysfunctional patients (DYS), according to the MPI-S, showed a higher amount of sickness absence and disability pension expressed in days than adaptive copers (AC) during the 7-years follow-up period, even when adjusting for sickness absence prior to rehabilitation (355.8days, 95% confidence interval, 71.7; 639.9). Forty percent of DYS patients and 26.7% of AC patients received disability pension during the follow-up period. However, this difference was not statistically significant. Further analyses showed that the difference between patient groups was most pronounced among patients with more than 60days of sickness absence prior to rehabilitation. Cost-effectiveness calculations indicated that the DYS patients showed an increase in production loss compared to AC patients. The present study yields support for the prognostic value of this subgroup classification method concerning long-term outcome on sick leave following this type of vocational rehabilitation.
PubMed ID
19683950 View in PubMed
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[7 years' experience with physical training in infarct]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55950
Source
Lakartidningen. 1979 Dec 12;76(50):4617-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-12-1979

8-Hydroxydeoxyguanosine: a new potential independent prognostic factor in breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97933
Source
Br J Cancer. 2010 Mar 16;102(6):1018-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-16-2010
Author
H. Sova
A. Jukkola-Vuorinen
U. Puistola
S. Kauppila
P. Karihtala
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Oulu University Hospital, Finland. henrijuh@mail.student.oulu.fi
Source
Br J Cancer. 2010 Mar 16;102(6):1018-23
Date
Mar-16-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - metabolism - mortality - pathology
Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast - diagnosis - metabolism - mortality - pathology
Deoxyguanosine - analogs & derivatives - blood - metabolism
Female
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Prognosis
Survival Analysis
Tumor Markers, Biological - analysis - metabolism
Abstract
BACKGROUND: 8-Hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) is the commonly used marker of oxidative stress-derived DNA damage. 8-OxodG formation is regulated by local antioxidant capacity and DNA repair enzyme activity. Earlier studies have reported contradictory data on the function of 8-oxodG as a prognostic factor in different cancer types. METHODS: We assessed pre-operative serum 8-oxodG levels with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in a well-defined series of 173 breast cancer patients. 8-OxodG expression in the nuclei of cancer cells from 150 of these patients was examined by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: The serum 8-oxodG levels and immunohistochemical 8-oxodG expression were in concordance with each other (P
PubMed ID
20179711 View in PubMed
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8125 records – page 1 of 813.