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588 records – page 1 of 59.

Source
Inuit Circumpolar Conference (Canada). Ottawa, ON. 54 p.
Publication Type
Report
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Conference (Canada). Ottawa, ON. 54 p.
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Greenland
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Keywords
Alaska
Chukotka
Climate change
Arctic Council
Biodiversity
Human Rights
Environment
Sustainable development
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Abnormalities of cornea, lens and retina. Survey findings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2704
Source
Canadian Journal of Opthalmology. 1973 Apr;8(2):291-297.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1973
Author
Wyatt, H.T.
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta
Source
Canadian Journal of Opthalmology. 1973 Apr;8(2):291-297.
Date
1973
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Corneal scarring
Labrador keratopathy
Pterygium
Degenerative retinal disease
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Arctic Regions
Canada
Cataract - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cornea
European Continental Ancestry Group
Eye Diseases - epidemiology - pathology
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits
Lens, Crystalline
Middle Aged
Retinal Diseases - epidemiology
Vision
Visual acuity
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation 2521.
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The Aboriginal economic benchmarking report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294132
Source
The National Aboriginal Economic Development Board. 37 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
June 2012
Aboriginal Economic Benchmarking Report, including: » The Canadian Census (1996, 2001, 2006) » The Aboriginal Peoples Survey (2001, 2006) » The Aboriginal Business Survey (2011) » Data collected by Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC) and Human Resources and Skills
  1 document  
Source
The National Aboriginal Economic Development Board. 37 p.
Date
June 2012
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3667838
Keywords
Canada
Humans
First Nations
Inuit
Métis
Notes
Updated and reprinted.
Documents

the-aboriginal-economic-benchmarking-report.pdf

Read PDF Online Download PDF
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Accidental deaths among British Columbia Indians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102957
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Jan 29;94(5):228-34.
Publication Type
Article
Date
29 Jan 1966
  1 website  
Author
Schmitt N
Hole LW
Barclay WS
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Jan 29;94(5):228-34.
Date
29 Jan 1966
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Accidents
Accidents, Traffic
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcoholic Intoxication
British Columbia
Burns
Child
Child, Preschool
Drowning
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Abstract
A statistical and epidemiological review of British Columbia native Indian and non-Indian mortality revealed that accidents were the leading cause of death among Indians but ranked only fourth among non-Indians. Comparison of accidental death rates by age and sex showed that, without exception, the rates among Indians were considerably higher than the corressponding rates for non-Indians. While the Indians represented some 2% of the total population of British Columbia, they accounted for over 10% of the total accident fatalities, 29% of drownings, and 21% of fatal burns.Socioeconomic, environmental and psychosocial factors and excessive drinking are considered the chief causes responsible for this rather unusual epidemiological phenomenon.This study revealed certain hazardous conditions which are specific to the Indian's present way of life. In the authors' opinion the recognition of these specific hazards is imperative for the planning of effective preventive campaigns.
Online Resources
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Acculturation and loss of fitness in the Inuit: the preventive role of active leisure

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5318
Source
Pages 213-217 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Experimental Plan. The present tests were conducted during the winter of 1989/90. All subjects were volunteers, living in Igloolik, and tested in accordance with a protocol approved by the Igloolik Hamlet Council and the l!niversi_ty of To- ronto Committee on Human Expenmentat1on. Tests and procedures
  1 document  
Author
Rode, A
Shephard, R.J
Author Affiliation
School of Physical & Health Education, University of Toronto
Source
Pages 213-217 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Acculturation
Adolescent
Adult
Body Composition
Exercise
Female
Humans
Inuits
Male
Northwest Territories
Physical Fitness
Abstract
The association between active leisure pursuits and various indices of fitness has been examined in 165 males aged 13-39 years and 95 females aged 13-29 years, all Inuit residents of the community of Igloolik, NWT (69 degrees 40'N). The active individuals have largely conserved the high level of fitness that characterized the settlement in 1969/70, showing substantial advantages over their sedentary peers in terms of relative aerobic power (27.7%, males, 21.3%, females) and subcutaneous fat (18.3%, males, 5.9%, females), with a lesser trend to advantages of strength (handgrip force, 4.4%, males, 0.8% females; knee extension force, 8.3%, males, 2.0%, females). Much of their continued aerobic fitness can probably be attributed to physical activity although in the boys aged 13-16 years, a further factor is the selection of active leisure pursuits by tall, heavy and early maturing individuals. Both the lower body fat and the larger aerobic power are likely to have positive implications for future health. The current challenge is thus to increase the proportion of physically active villagers beyond the current 18.8% of males and 11.6% of females.
PubMed ID
8397578 View in PubMed
Documents
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Acculturation and loss of fitness in the Inuit: the preventive role of active leisure

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102154
Source
Arctic Medical Research. 1993;Jul 52(3):107-112
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1993
Author
Rode, A
Shephard, R.J
Author Affiliation
School of Physical & Health Education, University of Toronto
Source
Arctic Medical Research. 1993;Jul 52(3):107-112
Date
Jul-1993
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adolescent
Adult
Body Composition
Exercise
Female
Humans
Inuits
Male
Northwest Territories
Physical Fitness
Abstract
The association between active leisure pursuits and various indices of fitness has been examined in 165 males aged 13-39 years and 95 females aged 13-29 years, all Inuit residents of the community of Igloolik, NWT (69 degrees 40'N). The active individuals have largely conserved the high level of fitness that characterized the settlement in 1969/70, showing substantial advantages over their sedentary peers in terms of relative aerobic power (27.7%, males, 21.3%, females) and subcutaneous fat (18.3%, males, 5.9%, females), with a lesser trend to advantages of strength (handgrip force, 4.4%, males, 0.8% females; knee extension force, 8.3%, males, 2.0%, females). Much of their continued aerobic fitness can probably be attributed to physical activity although in the boys aged 13-16 years, a further factor is the selection of active leisure pursuits by tall, heavy and early maturing individuals. Both the lower body fat and the larger aerobic power are likely to have positive implications for future health. The current challenge is thus to increase the proportion of physically active villagers beyond the current 18.8% of males and 11.6% of females.
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Acculturation and mental disorder in the Inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2301
Source
Canadian Journal of Psychiatry. 1980 Mar;25(2):173-181.
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1980
Author
Seltzer, A.
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto
Source
Canadian Journal of Psychiatry. 1980 Mar;25(2):173-181.
Date
Mar-1980
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Acculturation
Arctic Bay
Hysterical dissociation disorder
Paranoid personality disorder
Resolute Bay
Stress, mental
Adolescent
Adult
Aggression
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Anomie
Anxiety - epidemiology
Canada
Depression - epidemiology
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Identification (Psychology)
Interpersonal Relations
Inuits - psychology
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Psychophysiologic Disorders - epidemiology
Role
Schizophrenia - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Abstract
The phenomenon of acculturation stress is described with particular reference to the subsequent development of the transitional role conflict. The adolescent and young adult male Eskimo is especially susceptible to the anxiety generated by the process of acculturation and it is the interaction of this external stress with the bio-psychosocial characteristics of the individual within his ecological group, that may lead to an increased incidence of mental disorder. The clinical picture that develops will depend on the complex interaction of this psychosocial stressor and the level of ego development and its accompanying defence and coping strategies. We see how the development of manifest psychopathology in two young Inuit males was intimately associated with the stresses of acculturation acting upon personalities characterized by a low self-esteem and negative self-image, feelings of emasculation and a state of anomie. Coping and defensive strategies exhibited both similarities (drugs, alcohol, withdrawal, actin out) and differences (psychosis versus dissociation). The value of modified supportive therapy with continuity of care aimed at increasing self-esteem through sublimation, identification, reduction of dependency and encouragement of growth and autonomy is described, as are measures aimed at primary prevention.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2319.
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Source
Journal of Pediatrics. 1981 Aug; 99(2):211-214.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1981
Author
Kaplan, B.S.
Vitullo, B.
Author Affiliation
Montreal Children's Hospital
Source
Journal of Pediatrics. 1981 Aug; 99(2):211-214.
Date
1981
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Electrolytes
Acid-base metabolism
Diet, general
Acquired chloride diarrhea
Alkalosis - complications
Chlorides - metabolism
Diarrhea, Infantile - complications - metabolism
Feces - analysis
Humans
Infant
Inuits
Potassium - metabolism
Sodium - metabolism
Abstract
Seven patients with intractable diarrhea were found to be excreting large quantities of chloride in the stool, associated with metabolic alkalosis, hyponatremia, hypokalemia, hypochloremia, and the excretion of chloride-free urine. They appear to have had an acquired, transient form of chloride diarrhea. We speculate that the diarrhea may have been perpetuated, in part, by fecal loss of chloride.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2573.
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Acylation stimulating protein is higher in Inuit from Nunavik compared to a southern Quebec population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98475
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Dec;68(5):421-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Jessica D Smith
Katherine Cianflone
Eric Dewailly
Marie-Ludivine Château-Degat
Marie-Claude Vohl
Pierre Julien
Author Affiliation
Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et de Pneumologie de Québec, Y2186, 2725 Chemin Ste-foy, Ste-Foy G1V 4G5, Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Dec;68(5):421-32
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acylation
Adipokines - blood
Adult
Aged
Body Weights and Measures
Cross-Sectional Studies
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Humans
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins - blood
Inuits
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood - ethnology
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - blood - ethnology
Quebec - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Vitamin A - blood
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The Inuit of Nunavik in northern Quebec have a lower risk for ischemic heart disease (IHD) compared to Caucasian populations. Acylation stimulating protein (ASP), which is involved in the storage of dietary fat, may play a role. The objective of the study was to determine plasma concentration of ASP in an Inuit and a southern Quebec Caucasian population. STUDY DESIGN: This is a cross-sectional study evaluating the relationship between ASP and dietary factors, such as retinol, whose intake is higher in the Inuit. As well, concentrations of ASP were evaluated in relationship to components of the metabolic syndrome. METHODS: Medical history was collected via a questionnaire and anthropometric measurements and blood samples were collected. RESULTS: ASP was significantly higher in both the Inuit men and women compared to Caucasian men (66.1 +/- 4.1 nM vs 27.5 +/- 2.5 nM, p
Notes
RefSource: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Dec;68(5):419-20
PubMed ID
20044961 View in PubMed
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Adolescents with chronic disease. Are they receiving comprehensive health care?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241399
Source
J Adolesc Health Care. 1983 Dec;4(4):261-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1983
Author
G. Carroll
E. Massarelli
A. Opzoomer
G. Pekeles
M. Pedneault
J Y Frappier
N. Onetto
Source
J Adolesc Health Care. 1983 Dec;4(4):261-5
Date
Dec-1983
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Medicine
Canada
Chronic Disease - therapy
Comprehensive Health Care
Female
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research
Humans
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
A survey of adolescents with a chronic disease attending six specialty clinics was conducted to determine the sources of their primary health care and to estimate the extent of unmet health needs. Sixty-one patients completed a self-administered questionnaire. Forty percent had no source of primary care other than the subspecialty clinic treating their chronic condition. Seventy-eight percent regarded the subspecialist as their "personal" physician, although only 27% actually spoke to this physician about their general health needs. For 44% general health needs were not being met. These findings suggest that these adolescents expect the subspecialty clinic to provide primary care; yet they receive, at best, fragmented health care. This situation could be improved by a decision on the part of the subspecialty to restrict its role to providing only specific specialty care or to coordinate overall care.
PubMed ID
6643204 View in PubMed
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588 records – page 1 of 59.