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The AGES-Reykjavik Study suggests that change in kidney measures is associated with subclinical brain pathology in older community-dwelling persons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300494
Source
Kidney Int. 2018 09; 94(3):608-615
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-2018
Author
Sanaz Sedaghat
Jie Ding
Gudny Eiriksdottir
Mark A van Buchem
Sigurdur Sigurdsson
M Arfan Ikram
Osorio Meirelles
Vilmundur Gudnason
Andrew S Levey
Lenore J Launer
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; Department of Preventive Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA.
Source
Kidney Int. 2018 09; 94(3):608-615
Date
09-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Albuminuria - physiopathology - urine
Cerebral Small Vessel Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Creatinine - urine
Disease Progression
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glomerular Filtration Rate - physiology
Humans
Incidence
Independent living
Kidney - physiopathology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Prospective Studies
Renal Insufficiency, Chronic - physiopathology - urine
Risk factors
Serum Albumin
White Matter - diagnostic imaging - pathology
Abstract
Decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and albuminuria may be accompanied by brain pathology. Here we investigated whether changes in these kidney measures are linked to development of new MRI-detected infarcts and microbleeds, and progression of white matter hyperintensity volume. The study included 2671 participants from the population-based AGES-Reykjavik Study (mean age 75, 58.7% women). GFR was estimated from serum creatinine, and albuminuria was assessed by urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Brain MRI was acquired at baseline (2002-2006) and 5 years later (2007-2011). New MRI-detected infarcts and microbleeds were counted on the follow-up scans. White matter hyperintensity progression was estimated as percent change in white matter hyperintensity volumes between the two exams. Participants with a large eGFR decline (over 3 ml/min/1.73m2 per year) had more incident subcortical infarcts (odds ratio 1.53; 95% confidence interval 1.05, 2.22), and more marked progression of white matter hyperintensity volume (difference: 8%; 95% confidence interval: 4%, 12%), compared to participants without a large decline. Participants with incident albuminuria (over 30 mg/g) had 21% more white matter hyperintensity volume progression (95% confidence interval: 14%, 29%) and 1.86 higher odds of developing new deep microbleeds (95% confidence interval 1.16, 2.98), compared to participants without incident albuminuria. The findings were independent of cardiovascular risk factors. Changes in kidney measures were not associated with occurrence of cortical infarcts. Thus, larger changes in eGFR and albuminuria are associated with increased risk for developing manifestations of cerebral small vessel disease. Individuals with larger changes in these kidney measures should be considered as a high risk population for accelerated brain pathology.
PubMed ID
29960746 View in PubMed
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Allometric scaling of brain regions to intra-cranial volume: An epidemiological MRI study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289829
Source
Hum Brain Mapp. 2017 01; 38(1):151-164
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Date
01-2017
Author
Laura W de Jong
Jean-Sébastien Vidal
Lars E Forsberg
Alex P Zijdenbos
Thaddeus Haight
Sigurdur Sigurdsson
Vilmundur Gudnason
Mark A van Buchem
Lenore J Launer
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.
Source
Hum Brain Mapp. 2017 01; 38(1):151-164
Date
01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Algorithms
Alzheimer Disease - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology
Brain - diagnostic imaging - pathology
Brain Mapping
Community Health Planning
Coronary Artery Disease - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology - pathology
Female
Humans
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Netherlands - epidemiology
Reproducibility of Results
Sex Factors
Abstract
There is growing evidence that sub-structures of the brain scale allometrically to total brain size, that is, in a non-proportional and non-linear way. Here, scaling of different volumes of interest (VOI) to intra-cranial volume (ICV) was examined. It was assessed whether scaling was allometric or isometric and whether scaling coefficients significantly differed from each other. We also tested to what extent allometric scaling of VOI was introduced by the automated segmentation technique. Furthermore, reproducibility of allometric scaling was studied different age groups and study populations. Study samples included samples of cognitively healthy adults from the community-based Age Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study (AGES-Reykjavik Study) (N?=?3,883), the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study (CARDIA) (N =709), and the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) (N?=?180). Data encompassed participants with different age, ethnicity, risk factor profile, and ICV and VOI obtained with different automated MRI segmentation techniques. Our analysis showed that (1) allometric scaling is a trait of all parts of the brain, (2) scaling of neo-cortical white matter, neo-cortical gray matter, and deep gray matter structures including the cerebellum are significantly different from each other, and (3) allometric scaling of brain structures cannot solely be explained by age-associated atrophy, sex, ethnicity, or a systematic bias from study-specific segmentation algorithm, but appears to be a true feature of brain geometry. Hum Brain Mapp 38:151-164, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27557999 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of bone turnover markers with volumetric bone loss, periosteal apposition, and fracture risk in older men and women: the AGES-Reykjavik longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291359
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2016 12; 27(12):3485-3494
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Date
12-2016
Author
E A Marques
V Gudnason
T Lang
G Sigurdsson
S Sigurdsson
T Aspelund
K Siggeirsdottir
L Launer
G Eiriksdottir
T B Harris
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences, Intramural Research Program, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. elisa.marques@nih.gov.
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2016 12; 27(12):3485-3494
Date
12-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biomarkers - blood
Bone Density
Bone remodeling
Female
Femur Neck - pathology
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology
Humans
Iceland
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Abstract
Association between serum bone formation and resorption markers and cortical and trabecular bone loss and the concurrent periosteal apposition in a population-based cohort of 1069 older adults was assessed. BTM levels moderately reflect the cellular events at the endosteal and periosteal surfaces but are not associated with fracture risk.
We assessed whether circulating bone formation and resorption markers (BTM) were individual predictors for trabecular and cortical bone loss, periosteal expansion, and fracture risk in older adults aged 66 to 93 years from the AGES-Reykjavik study.
The sample for the quantitative computed tomography (QCT)-derived cortical and trabecular BMD and periosteal expansion analysis consisted of 1069 participants (474 men and 595 women) who had complete baseline (2002 to 2006) and follow-up (2007 to 2011) hip QCT scans and serum baseline BTM. During the median follow-up of 11.7 years (range 5.4-12.5), 54 (11.4 %) men and 182 (30.6 %) women sustained at least one fracture of any type.
Increase in BTM levels was associated with faster cortical and trabecular bone loss at the femoral neck and proximal femur in men and women. Higher BTM levels were positively related with periosteal expansion rate at the femoral neck in men. Markers were not associated with fracture risk.
This data corroborates the notion from few previous studies that both envelopes are metabolically active and that BTM levels may moderately reflect the cellular events at the endosteal and periosteal surfaces. However, our results do not support the routine use of BTM to assess fracture risk in older men and women. In light of these findings, further studies are justified to examine whether systemic markers of bone turnover might prove useful in monitoring skeletal remodeling events and the effects of current osteoporosis drugs at the periosteum.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27341810 View in PubMed
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Association of Maternal Psychosocial Stress With Increased Risk of Asthma Development in Offspring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301192
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2018 06 01; 187(6):1199-1209
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-01-2018
Author
Maria C Magnus
Rosalind J Wright
Espen Røysamb
Christine L Parr
Øystein Karlstad
Christian M Page
Per Nafstad
Siri E Håberg
Stephanie J London
Wenche Nystad
Author Affiliation
Division of Mental and Physical Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2018 06 01; 187(6):1199-1209
Date
06-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Asthma - drug therapy - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Cohort Studies
Depressive Disorder, Major - complications - drug therapy
Female
Humans
Life Change Events
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Mothers - psychology
Norway - epidemiology
Personal Satisfaction
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - drug therapy - psychology
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - psychology
Registries
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - complications - drug therapy
Abstract
Prenatal maternal psychosocial stress might influence the development of childhood asthma. Evaluating paternal psychosocial stress and conducting a sibling comparison could provide further insight into the role of unmeasured confounding. We examined the associations of parental psychosocial stress during and after pregnancy with asthma at age 7 years in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (n = 63,626; children born in 2000-2007). Measures of psychosocial stress included lifetime major depressive symptoms, current anxiety/depression symptoms, use of antidepressants, anxiolytics, and/or hypnotics, life satisfaction, relationship satisfaction, work stress, and social support. Childhood asthma was associated with maternal lifetime major depressive symptoms (adjusted relative risk (aRR) = 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.09, 1.30), in addition to symptoms of anxiety/depression during pregnancy (aRR = 1.17, 95% CI: 1.06, 1.29) and 6 months after delivery (aRR = 1.17, 95% CI: 1.07, 1.28). Maternal negative life events during pregnancy (aRR = 1.10, 95% CI: 1.06, 1.13) and 6 months after delivery (aRR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.11, 1.18) were also associated with asthma. These associations were not replicated when evaluated within sibling groups. There were no associations with paternal psychosocial stress. In conclusion, maternal anxiety/depression and negative life events were associated with offspring asthma, but this might be explained by unmeasured maternal background characteristics that remain stable across deliveries.
PubMed ID
29244063 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cigarette smoking and hip volumetric bone mineral density and cortical volume loss in older adults: The AGES-Reykjavik study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299034
Source
Bone. 2018 03; 108:186-192
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2018
Author
Elisa A Marques
Martine Elbejjani
Vilmundur Gudnason
Gunnar Sigurdsson
Thomas Lang
Sigurdur Sigurdsson
Thor Aspelund
Kristin Siggeirsdottir
Lenore Launer
Gudny Eiriksdottir
Tamara B Harris
Author Affiliation
National Institute on Aging, Intramural Research Program, Laboratory of Epidemiology and Population Sciences, Bethesda, MD, USA. Electronic address: elisa.marques@nih.gov.
Source
Bone. 2018 03; 108:186-192
Date
03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bone Density
Bone Resorption - diagnostic imaging - pathology - physiopathology
Cigarette Smoking - adverse effects
Cortical Bone - diagnostic imaging - pathology - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Iceland
Male
Pelvic Bones - diagnostic imaging - pathology - physiopathology
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
This study aimed to explore the relationships of several indicators of cigarette smoking habits (smoking status, pack-years, age at smoking initiation and smoking cessation) with quantitative computed tomographic (QCT)-derived proximal femur bone measures (trabecular vBMD, integral vBMD and the ratio of cortical to total tissue volume (cvol/ivol)) and with subsequent change in these measures over the next five years. A total of 2673 older adults (55.9% women), aged 66-92?years at baseline from the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik Study, who had two QCT scans of the hip were studied. In multivariable linear regression models, compared to never-smokers, current smokers had lower cvol/ivol at baseline and former-smokers had poorer measures on all outcomes (lower trabecular vBMD, integral vBMD and cvol/ivol), even when adjusted for several potential confounders. Further, among former smokers, those with higher pack-years had worse bone outcomes and those with longer duration since smoking cessation had better bone health at baseline. Analyses of change in bone measures revealed that compared to never-smokers, current smokers had significantly greater loss of trabecular vBMD, integral vBMD, and cvol/ivol. The regression models included adjustment for sex, age, education, and baseline body mass index, creatinine, % weight change from age 50, 25OHD, physical activity level, high-sensitive C-Reactive protein levels, alcohol and coffee consumption, history of diabetes mellitus, arthritis, and respiratory diseases. In conclusion, both current and former smoking showed adverse associations with bone health assessed with QCT. Results suggest that current smoking in particular may aggravate the rate of bone loss at older age and highlight implications for targeting this risk factor in populations that present higher smoking prevalence and vulnerability to bone fragility.
PubMed ID
29331300 View in PubMed
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Common origin of the gelsolin gene variant in 62 Finnish AGel amyloidosis families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296689
Source
Eur J Hum Genet. 2018 01; 26(1):117-123
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2018
Author
Tuuli Mustonen
Eeva-Kaisa Schmidt
Miko Valori
Pentti J Tienari
Sari Atula
Sari Kiuru-Enari
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Eur J Hum Genet. 2018 01; 26(1):117-123
Date
01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Amyloidosis - genetics
Corneal Dystrophies, Hereditary - genetics
Female
Finland
Founder Effect
Gelsolin - genetics
Haplotypes
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pedigree
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Abstract
Finnish gelsolin amyloidosis (AGel amyloidosis) is an autosomal dominantly inherited systemic disorder with ophthalmologic, neurologic and dermatologic symptoms. Only the gelsolin (GSN) c.640G>A variant has been found in the Finnish patients thus far. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the Finnish patients have a common ancestor or whether multiple mutation events have occurred at c.640G, which is a known mutational hot spot. A total of 79 Finnish AGel amyloidosis families including 707 patients were first discovered by means of patient interviews, genealogic studies and civil and parish registers. From each family 1-2 index patients were chosen. Blood samples were available from 71 index patients representing 64 families. After quality control, SNP array genotype data were available from 68 patients from 62 nuclear families. All the index patients had the same c.640G>A variant (rs121909715). Genotyping was performed using the Illumina CoreExome SNP array. The homozygosity haplotype method was used to analyse shared haplotypes. Haplotype analysis identified a shared haplotype, common to all studied patients. This shared haplotype included 17 markers and was 361?kb in length (GRCh37 coordinates 9:124003326-124364349) and this level of haplotype sharing was found to occur highly unlikely by chance. This GSN haplotype ranked as the largest shared haplotype in the 68 patients in a genome-wide analysis of haplotype block lengths. These results provide strong evidence that although there is a known mutational hot spot at GSN c.640G, all of the studied 62 Finnish AGel amyloidosis families are genetically linked to a common ancestor.
PubMed ID
29167514 View in PubMed
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Comparison of Summer and Winter Objectively Measured Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Older Adults: Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility Reykjavik Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290965
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 10 21; 14(10):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Date
10-21-2017
Author
Nanna Yr Arnardottir
Nina Dora Oskarsdottir
Robert J Brychta
Annemarie Koster
Dane R van Domelen
Paolo Caserotti
Gudny Eiriksdottir
Johanna E Sverrisdottir
Erlingur Johannsson
Lenore J Launer
Vilmundur Gudnason
Tamara B Harris
Kong Y Chen
Thorarinn Sveinsson
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Education, University of Akureyri, Nordurslod 2, 600 Akureyri, Iceland. nanna@unak.is.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 10 21; 14(10):
Date
10-21-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Keywords
Accelerometry
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Exercise
Female
Humans
Iceland
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Seasons
Sedentary lifestyle
Abstract
In Iceland, there is a large variation in daylight between summer and winter. The aim of the study was to identify how this large variation influences physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior (SB). Free living PA was measured by a waist-worn accelerometer for one week during waking hours in 138 community-dwelling older adults (61.1% women, 80.3 ± 4.9 years) during summer and winter months. In general, SB occupied about 75% of the registered wear-time and was highly correlated with age (ß = 0.36). Although the differences were small, more time was spent during the summer in all PA categories, except for the moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA), and SB was reduced. More lifestyle PA (LSPA) was accumulated in =5-min bouts during summer than winter, especially among highly active participants. This information could be important for policy makers and health professionals working with older adults. Accounting for seasonal difference is necessary in analyzing SB and PA data.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29065475 View in PubMed
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Co-regulatory networks of human serum proteins link genetics to disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295576
Source
Science. 2018 08 24; 361(6404):769-773
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-24-2018
Author
Valur Emilsson
Marjan Ilkov
John R Lamb
Nancy Finkel
Elias F Gudmundsson
Rebecca Pitts
Heather Hoover
Valborg Gudmundsdottir
Shane R Horman
Thor Aspelund
Le Shu
Vladimir Trifonov
Sigurdur Sigurdsson
Andrei Manolescu
Jun Zhu
Örn Olafsson
Johanna Jakobsdottir
Scott A Lesley
Jeremy To
Jia Zhang
Tamara B Harris
Lenore J Launer
Bin Zhang
Gudny Eiriksdottir
Xia Yang
Anthony P Orth
Lori L Jennings
Vilmundur Gudnason
Author Affiliation
Icelandic Heart Association, Holtasmari 1, IS-201 Kopavogur, Iceland. valur@hjarta.is v.gudnason@hjarta.is jlamb@gnf.org.
Source
Science. 2018 08 24; 361(6404):769-773
Date
08-24-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aptamers, Nucleotide
Blood Proteins - analysis - genetics
Cardiovascular Diseases - genetics
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genetic Variation
Humans
Iceland
Metabolic Diseases - genetics
Metabolic Networks and Pathways
Proteome - analysis - genetics
Proteomics - methods
Abstract
Proteins circulating in the blood are critical for age-related disease processes; however, the serum proteome has remained largely unexplored. To this end, 4137 proteins covering most predicted extracellular proteins were measured in the serum of 5457 Icelanders over 65 years of age. Pairwise correlation between proteins as they varied across individuals revealed 27 different network modules of serum proteins, many of which were associated with cardiovascular and metabolic disease states, as well as overall survival. The protein modules were controlled by cis- and trans-acting genetic variants, which in many cases were also associated with complex disease. This revealed co-regulated groups of circulating proteins that incorporated regulatory control between tissues and demonstrated close relationships to past, current, and future disease states.
Notes
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PubMed ID
30072576 View in PubMed
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Dietary habits in adolescence and midlife and risk of breast cancer in older women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296188
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(5):e0198017
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Alfheidur Haraldsdottir
Johanna E Torfadottir
Unnur A Valdimarsdottir
Hans-Olov Adami
Thor Aspelund
Laufey Tryggvadottir
Marianna Thordardottir
Bryndis E Birgisdottir
Tamara B Harris
Lenore J Launer
Vilmundur Gudnason
Laufey Steingrimsdottir
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Food Science and Human Nutrition, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(5):e0198017
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Dietary Supplements
Feeding Behavior
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Risk
Young Adult
Abstract
Recent studies indicate that lifestyle factors in early life affect breast cancer risk. We therefore explored the association of high consumption of meat, milk, and whole grain products in adolescence and midlife, on breast cancer risk. We used data from the population based AGES-Reykjavik cohort (2002-2006), where 3,326 women with a mean age of 77 years (SD 6.0) participated. For food items and principal component derived dietary patterns we used Cox proportional models to calculate multivariate hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). During a mean follow-up of 8.8 years, 97 women were diagnosed with breast cancer. For both adolescence and midlife, daily consumption of rye bread was positively associated with breast cancer (HR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1-2.6 and HR 1.8, 95% CI 1.1-2.9, respectively). In contrast, persistent high consumption of oatmeal was negatively associated with breast cancer (0.4, 95% CI 0.2-0.9). No association was found for other food items or dietary patterns that included rye bread. High rye bread consumption in adolescence and midlife may increase risk of late-life breast cancer whilst persistent consumption of oatmeal may reduce the risk.
Notes
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ErratumIn: PLoS One. 2018 Oct 15;13(10):e0206026 PMID 30321233
PubMed ID
29847592 View in PubMed
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Early Life Residence, Fish Consumption, and Risk of Breast Cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289825
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2017 03; 26(3):346-354
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Date
03-2017
Author
Alfheidur Haraldsdottir
Laufey Steingrimsdottir
Unnur A Valdimarsdottir
Thor Aspelund
Laufey Tryggvadottir
Tamara B Harris
Lenore J Launer
Lorelei A Mucci
Edward L Giovannucci
Hans-Olov Adami
Vilmundur Gudnason
Johanna E Torfadottir
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Food Science and Human Nutrition, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. alh1@hi.is.
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2017 03; 26(3):346-354
Date
03-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Animals
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Fatty Acids, Omega-3
Feeding Behavior
Female
Fish Oils
Fishes
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Longitudinal Studies
Menarche
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Seafood
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Background: Little is known about fish intake throughout the life course and the risk of breast cancer.Methods: We used data on the first residence of 9,340 women born 1908 to 1935 in the Reykjavik Study as well as food frequency data for different periods of life from a subgroup of the cohort entering the Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility (AGES)-Reykjavik Study (n = 2,882).Results: During a mean follow-up of 27.3 years, 744 women were diagnosed with breast cancer in the Reykjavik Study. An inverse association of breast cancer was observed among women who lived through the puberty period in coastal villages, compared with women residing in the capital area [HR, 0.78; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.61-0.99]. In the subgroup analysis of this Icelandic population, generally characterized by high fish intake, we found an indication of lower risk of breast cancer among women with high fish consumption (more than 4 portions per week) in adolescence (HR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.44-1.13) and midlife (HR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.22-0.97), compared with low consumers (2 portions per week or less). No association was found for fish liver oil consumption in any time period, which could be due to lack of a reference group with low omega-3 fatty acids intake in the study group.Conclusions: Our findings suggest that very high fish consumption in early to midlife may be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer.Impact: Very high fish consumption in early adulthood to midlife may be associated with decreased risk of breast cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(3); 346-54. ©2016 AACR.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27765796 View in PubMed
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