Skip header and navigation

Refine By

185 records – page 1 of 19.

18F FDG-PET/CT evaluation of histological response after neoadjuvant treatment in patients with cancer of the esophagus or gastroesophageal junction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299743
Source
Acta Radiol. 2019 May; 60(5):578-585
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
May-2019
Author
Stefan Gabrielson
Alejandro Sanchez-Crespo
Fredrik Klevebro
Rimma Axelsson
Jon Albert Tsai
Ove Johansson
Magnus Nilsson
Author Affiliation
1 Department of Nuclear Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Radiol. 2019 May; 60(5):578-585
Date
May-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Esophageal Neoplasms - therapy
Esophagogastric Junction - diagnostic imaging
Esophagus - diagnostic imaging
Female
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoadjuvant Therapy - methods
Norway
Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography - methods
Radiopharmaceuticals
Sweden
Abstract
In most parts of the world, curatively intended treatment for esophageal cancer includes neoadjuvant therapy, either with chemoradiotherapy or chemotherapy alone, followed by esophagectomy. Currently 18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is used for preoperative disease staging, but is not well established in the evaluation of neoadjuvant treatment.
To evaluate changes in PET parameters in relation to the histological primary tumor response in the surgical specimen in patients randomized to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy or chemotherapy.
Patients were randomized between either neoadjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy followed by esophagectomy.18F-FDG PET/CT exams were conducted at baseline and following neoadjuvant treatment. Standardized uptake ratio (SUR) values were measured in the primary tumor and compared as regards histological responders and non-responders as well as different treatment arms.
Seventy-nine patients were enrolled and 51 were available for analysis. A significant rate of SUR reduction was observed ( P?=?0.02) in the primary tumor in histological responders compared to non-responders. Changes in SUR were significantly greater in responders following chemoradiotherapy ( P?=?0.02), but not following chemotherapy alone ( P?=?0.49). There was no statistically significant difference in SUR in patients with a complete histological response compared to those with a subtotal response.
Our results are similar to those of previous studies and show that changes in the rate of SUR can be used reliably to differentiate histological responders from non-responders after neoadjuvant treatment with either chemoradiotherapy or chemotherapy. Limitations of current PET technology are likely to restrict the possibility of accurately ruling out limited residual disease.
PubMed ID
30111193 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Accuracy of the Computed Tomography Diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis: Does the Experience of the Radiologist Matter?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294920
Source
Scand J Surg. 2018 Mar; 107(1):43-47
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Mar-2018
Author
E Lietzén
P Salminen
I Rinta-Kiikka
H Paajanen
T Rautio
P Nordström
M Aarnio
T Rantanen
J Sand
J-P Mecklin
A Jartti
J Virtanen
P Ohtonen
N Ånäs
J M Grönroos
Author Affiliation
1 Division of Digestive Surgery and Urology, Department of Acute and Digestive Surgery, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
Source
Scand J Surg. 2018 Mar; 107(1):43-47
Date
Mar-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Appendectomy - methods
Appendicitis - diagnostic imaging - drug therapy - surgery
Clinical Competence
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Radiologists
Risk assessment
Tomography, X-Ray Computed - methods
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
To assess the accuracy of computed tomography in diagnosing acute appendicitis with a special reference to radiologist experience.
Data were collected prospectively in our randomized controlled trial comparing surgery and antibiotic treatment for uncomplicated acute appendicitis (APPAC trial, NCT01022567). We evaluated 1065 patients who underwent computed tomography for suspected appendicitis. The on-call radiologist preoperatively analyzed these computed tomography images. In this study, the radiologists were divided into experienced (consultants) and inexperienced (residents) ones, and the comparison of interpretations was made between these two radiologist groups.
Out of the 1065 patients, 714 had acute appendicitis and 351 had other or no diagnosis on computed tomography. There were 700 true-positive, 327 true-negative, 14 false-positive, and 24 false-negative cases. The sensitivity and the specificity of computed tomography were 96.7% (95% confidence interval, 95.1-97.8) and 95.9% (95% confidence interval, 93.2-97.5), respectively. The rate of false computed tomography diagnosis was 4.2% for experienced consultant radiologists and 2.2% for inexperienced resident radiologists (p?=?0.071). Thus, the experience of the radiologist had no effect on the accuracy of computed tomography diagnosis.
The accuracy of computed tomography in diagnosing acute appendicitis was high. The experience of the radiologist did not improve the diagnostic accuracy. The results emphasize the role of computed tomography as an accurate modality in daily routine diagnostics for acute appendicitis in all clinical emergency settings.
PubMed ID
28929862 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between adherence to the Danish Food-Based Dietary Guidelines and cardiometabolic risk factors in a Danish adult population: the DIPI study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299378
Source
Br J Nutr. 2018 03; 119(6):664-673
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2018
Author
Johanne L Arentoft
Camilla Hoppe
Elisabeth W Andersen
Kim Overvad
Inge Tetens
Author Affiliation
1Division of Diet, Disease Prevention and Toxicology,National Food Institute,Technical University of Denmark,2800 Kgs. Lyngby,Denmark.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2018 03; 119(6):664-673
Date
03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Diet
Dietary Sugars - administration & dosage
Exercise
Fatty Acids - administration & dosage
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Food Quality
Fruit
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Male
Metabolic Syndrome - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Policy
Patient compliance
Risk factors
Single-Blind Method
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vegetables
Waist Circumference
Whole Grains
Abstract
Diet is recognised as one modifiable lifestyle factor for ischaemic heart disease (IHD). We aimed at investigating the associations between adherence to the Danish Food-Based Dietary Guidelines (FBDG) indicated by a Dietary Quality Index (DQI) and selected cardiometabolic risk factors in a cross-sectional study with 219 Danish adult participants (59 %women; age 31-65years) with a minimum of one self-rated risk marker of IHD. Information regarding diet was obtained using web-based dietary assessment software and adherence to the Danish FBDG was expressed by a DQI calculated from 5 food and nutrient indicators (whole grain, fish, fruit and vegetables, energy from saturated fat and from added sugar). Background information, blood samples and anthropometrics were collected and blood pressure was measured. Linear regression analyses were used to evaluate the association between DQI and cardiometabolic risk factors. DQI was inversely associated with LDL:HDL ratio and TAG (-0·089 per unit; 95 % CI -0·177, -0·002 and -5 % per unit; 95 % CI -9, 0, respectively) and positively associated with HDL-cholesterol (0·047 mmol/l per unit; 95 % CI 0·007, 0·088). For men, DQI was inversely associated with BMI (-3 %per unit; 95 % CI -5, -1), trunk fat (-1 % per unit; 95 % CI -2, -1), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (-30 % per unit; 95 % CI -41, -16 %), HbA1c (-0·09 % per unit; 95 % CI -0·14, -0·04), insulin (-13 % per unit; 95 % CI -19, -7) and homoeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (-14 % per unit; 95 % CI -21, -7). In women, DQI was positively associated with systolic blood pressure (2·6 mmHg per unit; 95 % CI 0·6, 4·6). In conclusion, higher adherence to the current Danish FBDG was associated with a more beneficial cardiometabolic risk profile in a Danish adult population with a minimum of one self-rated risk factor for IHD.
PubMed ID
29352831 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations of Parental Self-Efficacy With Diet, Physical Activity, Body Composition, and Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Swedish Preschoolers: Results From the MINISTOP Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299393
Source
Health Educ Behav. 2018 04; 45(2):238-246
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2018
Author
Niyati Parekh
Pontus Henriksson
Christine Delisle Nyström
Kristin Silfvernagel
Jonatan R Ruiz
Francisco B Ortega
Jeremy Pomeroy
Marie Löf
Author Affiliation
1 New York University, New York, NY, USA.
Source
Health Educ Behav. 2018 04; 45(2):238-246
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Accelerometry
Adult
Body Composition
Body mass index
Cardiorespiratory Fitness - physiology
Cell Phone
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Exercise
Female
Humans
Male
Parents
Self Efficacy
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
High parental self-efficacy (PSE) has been associated with healthy diets and higher levels of physical activity (PA) in children; however, data on PSE in relation to body weight and body composition are scarce. The objective of this study was to investigate associations of PSE with measures of diet, PA, body composition, and physical fitness in early childhood.
We used baseline data from the MINISTOP trial in healthy Swedish children ( n = 301; 4.5 ± 0.15 years). PSE was assessed using a questionnaire, dietary data were collected using a mobile technology-assisted methodology, and PA was obtained (sedentary behavior and moderate-to-vigorous) by accelerometry. Body composition was measured using the pediatric option for BodPod and cardiorespiratory fitness by the 20 m shuttle run. Linear regression was conducted to evaluate cross-sectional associations of the outcomes in relation to total PSE and scores computed for the individual PSE factors: (1) diet, (2) limit setting of unhealthful behaviors, and (3) PA.
Higher scores of total PSE and the diet factor were associated with higher fruit intake (ß = 0.82 g/point and 1.99 g/point; p = .014 and .009, respectively) and lower consumption of unhealthy snacks (ß = -0.42 g/point and -0.89 g/point; p = .012 and .020, respectively) after adjustment for parental body mass index and education, respondent, and child's sex and age. No associations were observed between PSE and PA, body composition, or cardiorespiratory fitness.
Our study noted that PSE should be considered in conjunction with other strategies for a sustainable impact on childhood obesity.
PubMed ID
28629222 View in PubMed
Less detail

Asymptomatic coronary artery disease in a Norwegian cohort with type 2 diabetes: a prospective angiographic study with intravascular ultrasound evaluation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299563
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2019 03 09; 18(1):26
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-09-2019
Author
Satish Arora
Anne Pernille Ofstad
Geir R Ulimoen
Kåre I Birkeland
Knut Endresen
Lars Gullestad
Odd Erik Johansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Oslo University Hospital Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Cardiovasc Diabetol. 2019 03 09; 18(1):26
Date
03-09-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Asymptomatic Diseases
Combined Modality Therapy
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Disease - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Diabetic Angiopathies - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology - prevention & control
Disease Progression
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Ultrasonography, Interventional
Abstract
The prevalence of asymptomatic coronary artery disease (CAD) in type 2 diabetes (T2D) is unclear. We investigated the extent and prevalence of asymptomatic CAD in T2D patients by utilizing invasive coronary angiography (ICA) and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS), and whether CAD progression, evaluated by ICA, could be modulated with a multi-intervention to reduce cardiovascular (CV) risk.
Fifty-six T2D patients with?=?1 additional CV risk factor participated in a 2 year randomized controlled study comparing hospital-based multi-intervention (multi, n?=?30) versus standard care (stand, n?=?26), with a pre-planned follow-up at year seven. They underwent ICA at baseline and both ICA and IVUS at year seven. ICA was described by conventional CAD severity and extent scores. IVUS was described by maximal intimal thickness (MIT), percent and total atheroma volume and compared with individuals without T2D and CAD (heart transplant donors who had IVUS performed 7-11 weeks post-transplant, n?=?147).
Despite CV risk reduction in multi after 2 years intervention, there was no between-group difference in the progression of CAD at year seven. Overall, the prevalence of CAD defined by MIT?=?0.5 mm in the T2DM subjects was 84%, and as compared to the non-T2DM controls there was a significantly higher atheroma burden (mean MIT, PAV and TAV in the T2D population were 0.75?±?0.27 mm, 33.8?±?9.8% and 277.0?±?137.3 mm3 as compared to 0.41?±?0.19 mm, 17.8?±?7.3% and 134.9?±?100.6 mm3 in the reference population).
We demonstrated that a 2 year multi-intervention, despite improvement in CV risk factors, did not influence angiographic progression of CAD. Further, IVUS revealed that the prevalence of asymptomatic CAD in T2D patients is high, suggesting a need for a broader residual CV risk management using alternative approaches. Trial registration Clinical trials.gov id: NCT00133718 ( https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00133718 ).
PubMed ID
30851727 View in PubMed
Less detail

Baseline data from a planned RCT on attitudes to female genital cutting after migration: when are interventions justified?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291440
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 Aug 11; 7(8):e017506
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Aug-11-2017
Author
Anna Wahlberg
Sara Johnsdotter
Katarina Ekholm Selling
Carina Källestål
Birgitta Essén
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 Aug 11; 7(8):e017506
Date
Aug-11-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude
Circumcision, Female - ethnology
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Genitalia, Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Skin
Somalia - ethnology
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
To present the primary outcomes from a baseline study on attitudes towards female genital cutting (FGC) after migration.
Baseline data from a planned cluster randomised, controlled trial. Face-to-face interviews were used to collect questionnaire data in 2015. Based on our hypothesis that established Somalis could be used as facilitators of change among those newly arrived, data were stratified into years of residency in Sweden.
Sweden.
372 Somali men and women, 206 newly arrived (0-4 years), 166 established (>4 years).
Whether FGC is acceptable, preferred for daughter and should continue, specified on anatomical extent.
The support for anatomical change of girls and women's genitals ranged from 0% to 2% among established and from 4% to 8% among newly arrived. Among those supporting no anatomical change, 75%-83% among established and 53%-67% among newly arrived opposed all forms of FGC, with the remaining supporting pricking of the skin with no removal of tissue. Among newly arrived, 37% stated that pricking was acceptable, 39% said they wanted their daughter to be pricked and 26% reported they wanted pricking to continue being practised. Those who had lived in Sweden = 2?years had highest odds of supporting FGC; thereafter, the opposition towards FGC increased over time after migration.
A majority of Somali immigrants, including those newly arrived, opposed all forms of FGC with increased opposition over time after migration. The majority of proponents of FGC supported pricking. We argue that it would have been unethical to proceed with the intervention as it, with this baseline, would have been difficult to detect a change in attitudes given that a majority opposed all forms of FGC together with the evidence that a strong attitude change is already happening. Therefore, we decided not to implement the planned intervention.
Trial registration number NCT02335697;Pre-results.
Notes
Cites: Afr J Reprod Health. 2014 Jun;18(2):22-35 PMID 25022139
Cites: Res Nurs Health. 2007 Aug;30(4):459-67 PMID 17654487
Cites: Med Anthropol Q. 2002 Sep;16(3):312-40 PMID 12227259
Cites: Med Anthropol. 2015;34(4):371-88 PMID 26076054
Cites: Obstet Gynecol Int. 2013;2013:467028 PMID 23843795
Cites: Health Care Women Int. 2009 Jan-Feb;30(1-2):114-33 PMID 19116825
Cites: Ethn Health. 2004 Feb;9(1):75-100 PMID 15203466
Cites: BMJ. 2006 Jul 15;333(7559):124 PMID 16803943
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2012 Aug 27;12:697 PMID 22925310
Cites: Obstet Gynecol Int. 2013;2013:348248 PMID 23737795
Cites: Eur J Contracept Reprod Health Care. 2005 Jun;10(2):93-7 PMID 16147813
Cites: Sex Reprod Healthc. 2013 Oct;4(3):93-8 PMID 24041729
Cites: Stud Fam Plann. 2012 Jun;43(2):135-46 PMID 23175952
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2006 Oct;35(5):1292-300 PMID 16943232
Cites: Reprod Health Matters. 2010 May;18(35):29-37 PMID 20541081
Cites: J Med Ethics. 2016 Mar;42(3):158-63 PMID 26792817
Cites: J Med Ethics. 2016 Mar;42(3):148-54 PMID 26902479
Cites: Obstet Gynecol Int. 2013;2013:324362 PMID 23983698
Cites: Afr J Reprod Health. 2006 Aug;10(2):57-71 PMID 17217118
Cites: Reprod Health Matters. 2014 May;22(43):169-77 PMID 24908468
Cites: Best Pract Res Clin Obstet Gynaecol. 2016 Apr;32:15-25 PMID 26644059
PubMed ID
28801440 View in PubMed
Less detail

BDNF Val66Met and childhood adversity on response to physical exercise and internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy in depressed Swedish adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290870
Source
J Psychiatr Res. 2017 Oct; 93:50-58
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Oct-2017
Author
Md Shafiqur Rahman
Vincent Millischer
Zangin Zeebari
Yvonne Forsell
Catharina Lavebratt
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Psychiatr Res. 2017 Oct; 93:50-58
Date
Oct-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor - genetics
Child Abuse - psychology
Cognitive Therapy - methods
Cohort Studies
Depression - genetics - psychology - rehabilitation
Exercise - physiology
Female
Genotype
Humans
Internet
Logistic Models
Male
Methionine - genetics
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Genetic - genetics
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden - epidemiology
Valine - metabolism
Abstract
The genetic effect of Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on treatment response in depression is not consistent in the literature. Childhood adversity is a known risk factor for depression which has been reported to increase depression susceptibility by interacting with BDNF genetic variation. We aimed to explore whether the BDNF variation Val66Met and childhood adversity (CA) predicted the treatment response to a 12-week intervention with physical exercise (PE) or internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (ICBT) when compared with treatment as usual (TAU). A prospective cohort study nested within a randomised control trial was conducted using data from 547 participants with mild to moderate depression. Depression severity at baseline and follow-up was measured using the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale. Met allele carriers without exposure to CA and current antidepressant use showed higher treatment response to PE than Val homozygotes. There was no evidence to support that BDNF Val66Met or CA alone predicted treatment response to PE and ICBT. The Met carriers had higher serum mature BDNF level. These data suggest that Met allele carriers benefit more from PE treatment but only if they are not exposed to early adversity.
PubMed ID
28578208 View in PubMed
Less detail

Biomarkers of Individual Foods, and Separation of Diets Using Untargeted LC-MS-based Plasma Metabolomics in a Randomized Controlled Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300058
Source
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2019 01; 63(1):e1800215
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2019
Author
Evrim Acar
Gözde Gürdeniz
Bekzod Khakimov
Francesco Savorani
Sanne Kellebjerg Korndal
Thomas Meinert Larsen
Søren Balling Engelsen
Arne Astrup
Lars O Dragsted
Author Affiliation
Simula Metropolitan Center for Digital Engineering, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2019 01; 63(1):e1800215
Date
01-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Biomarkers - blood
Carbohydrate Metabolism
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Diet
Eating
Fasting
Female
Humans
Male
Mass Spectrometry
Metabolomics - methods
Middle Aged
Norway
Phospholipids - blood - chemistry
Abstract
Self-reported dietary intake does not represent an objective unbiased assessment. The effect of the new Nordic diet (NND) versus average Danish diet (ADD) on plasma metabolic profiles is investigated to identify biomarkers of compliance and metabolic effects.
In a 26-week controlled dietary intervention study, 146 subjects followed either NND, a predominantly organic diet high in fruit, vegetables, whole grains, and fish, or ADD, a diet higher in imported and processed foods. Fasting plasma samples are analyzed with untargeted ultra-performance liquid chromatography-quadruple time-of-flight. It is demonstrated that supervised machine learning with feature selection can separate NND and ADD samples with an average test set performance of up to 0.88 area under the curve. The NND plasma metabolome is characterized by diet-related metabolites, such as pipecolic acid betaine (whole grain), trimethylamine oxide, and prolyl hydroxyproline (both fish intake), while theobromine (chocolate) and proline betaine (citrus) were associated with ADD. Amino acid (i.e., indolelactic acid and hydroxy-3-methylbutyrate) and fat metabolism (butyryl carnitine) characterize ADD whereas NND is associated with higher concentrations of polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines.
The plasma metabolite profiles are predictive of dietary patterns and reflected good compliance while indicating effects of potential health benefit, including changes in fat metabolism and glucose utilization.
PubMed ID
30094970 View in PubMed
Less detail

C3-epimerization of 25-hydroxyvitamin D increases with increasing serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and shows a high degree of tracking over time.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293019
Source
Clin Biochem. 2018 Apr; 54:61-67
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Julia M Kubiak
Guri Grimnes
Kevin D Cashman
Elena Kamycheva
Kirsten Dowling
Zuzana Skrabáková
Rolf Jorde
Author Affiliation
Tromsø Endocrine Research Group, Institute of Clinical Medicine, UiT - The Arctic University of Norway, 9037 Tromsø, Norway; Division of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of North Norway, 9038 Tromsø, Norway. Electronic address: julia.magdalena.kubiak@unn.no.
Source
Clin Biochem. 2018 Apr; 54:61-67
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Time Factors
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives - pharmacokinetics
Vitamin D-Binding Protein - blood
Abstract
Evaluate the effects of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels, vitamin D binding protein (DBP) and genetic factors on C3-epimerization of 25(OH)D and follow the tracking of the epimer during one year.
Cross-sectional and longitudinal study.
Data from eight previously conducted, Tromsø based studies (3 observational, 5 randomized controlled trials) were combined. 25(OH)D serum samples were re-analyzed with a LC-MS/MS method that also resolves and measures the metabolite C3-epi-25(OH)D3. Data on vitamin D binding protein (DBP) phenotype (based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs4588 and rs7041) and genetic determinants for serum 25(OH)D (SNPs rs2282679, rs10741657, rs3829251 and rs6013897) were collected where available.
2219 subjects were included. Median (5th, 95th percentiles) baseline serum values of 25(OH)D3, C3-epi-25(OH)D3, and %-C3-epi-25(OH)D3 were 49.1 (22.1, 92.8)?nmol/L, 2.3 (0.9, 6.0)?nmol/L and 4.4 (2.7, 8.4) %, respectively. The highest baseline values were 230.5?nmol/L for 25(OH)D3, 79.7?nmol/L for C3-epi-25(OH)D3 and 48.2% for %-C3-epi-25(OH)D3. There was a strong correlation between serum 25(OH)D3 and C3-epi-25(OH)D3. The %-C3-epi-25(OH)D3 value increased with increasing serum 25(OH)D3, but leveled off at ~7% at a 25(OH)D3 concentration of ~120-140?nmol/L. There was a significant degree of tracking for %-C3-epi-25(OH)D3 (correlation coefficient rho between baseline and 1-year values 0.39, P?
PubMed ID
29476721 View in PubMed
Less detail

Can Reproductive Life Plan-based counselling increase men's fertility awareness?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298204
Source
Ups J Med Sci. 2018 Dec; 123(4):255-263
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Dec-2018
Author
Maja Bodin
Tanja Tydén
Lisa Käll
Margareta Larsson
Author Affiliation
a Department of Women's and Children's Health , Uppsala University , Uppsala , Sweden.
Source
Ups J Med Sci. 2018 Dec; 123(4):255-263
Date
Dec-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Counseling - methods
Family Planning Services - methods
Fertility
Health Behavior
Health Education - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Policy
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Preconception Care
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Many men have limited knowledge about reproductive health and fertility. The aim of the study was to evaluate if Reproductive Life Plan (RLP)-based counselling during a sexual health visit could increase men's fertility awareness.
The study was a randomized controlled trial including 201 men aged 18-50 who visited either of two participating sexual health clinics in Sweden for sexually transmitted infection testing during 2014-2016. All men received standard care, and men in the intervention group (IG) also received oral and written RLP-based information about lifestyle and fertility. Awareness about fertility and lifestyle-related factors were the main outcomes, measured through a questionnaire before the intervention and through a telephone survey after three months. Impressions from the counselling were also assessed at follow-up.
A majority (71%) of men wanted children in the future. General fertility awareness increased from a mean score of 4.6 to 5.5 out of 12 (P?=?0.004) in the IG. The mean number of accurate lifestyle factors (that could affect fertility) mentioned increased from 3.6 to 4.4 (P?
PubMed ID
30541376 View in PubMed
Less detail

185 records – page 1 of 19.