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Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium Cancer Education Videos

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288393
Publication Type
Interactive/Multimedia
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC)
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Interactive/Multimedia
Digital File Format
Windows Media Video (.WMV)
Keywords
Indigenous Collections
Health & Wellness
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium Cancer Education Videos
Female
Humans
Male
Community health workers
Testicular Neoplasms
Alaska Natives
Alaska
Colorectal Neoplasms
Mammography
Neoplasms
Germ Cell and Embryonal
Television
Prostatic Neoplasms
Healthy Lifestyle
Rectal Neoplasms
Abstract
These videos were created to provide culturally informed cancer education resources and learning opportunities for Community Health Aides and Community Health Practitioners (CHA/Ps), the primary providers of health care in rural Alaska, along with the people of their communities. <p style="margin-left:40px"><a href="mms://wm.uaa.alaska.edu/emedia/health/Awake.wmv">Awakening Choices: Colon Health, Our Stories</a> <p style="margin-left:40px">Sharing stories: Alaska Native people talk about colon/rectum cancer and healthy lifestyle choices. The importance of early detection through colon/rectum screening is emphasized. [28:17 min]<br /> (This interview requires the use of the Windows Media Player, which can be downloaded from <a class="style5" href="http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows/downloads/windows-media-player">Windows Media Player's Web site</a> at no charge.) <p style="margin-left:40px"><a href="mms://wm.uaa.alaska.edu/emedia/health/strong.wmv">Staying Strong, Staying Healthy: Alaska Men Talk About Cancer</a> <p style="margin-left:40px">Specifically for Alaska Native men, this program addresses colon/rectum cancer, prostate cancer, and testicular cancer. [28:17 min]<br /> (This interview requires the use of the Windows Media Player, which can be downloaded from <a class="style5" href="http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows/downloads/windows-media-player">Windows Media Player's Web site</a> at no charge.) <p style="margin-left:40px"><a href="mms://wm.uaa.alaska.edu/emedia/health/basket.wmv">The Story Basket: Weaving Breast Health into Our Lives</a> <p style="margin-left:40px">Alaska Native women discuss the importance of breast health. It includes the process involved in a personal breast exam and mammogram. [30:00 min] <p style="margin-left:40px"><a href="mms://wm.uaa.alaska.edu/emedia/garrett/light.wmv">Understanding: Stepping into the Light</a> <p style="margin-left:40px">The play, which was adapted for television to reach rural, Alaska Native communities, enters the silence, making audible the experience of cancer. [27:01 min]<br /> (This interview requires the use of the Windows Media Player, which can be downloaded from <a class="style5" href="http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows/downloads/windows-media-player">Windows Media Player's Web site</a> at no charge.)
Online Resources
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Comparative effectiveness of radical prostatectomy and radiotherapy in prostate cancer: observational study of mortality outcomes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104886
Source
BMJ. 2014;348:g1502
Publication Type
Article
Interactive/Multimedia
Date
2014
Author
Prasanna Sooriakumaran
Tommy Nyberg
Olof Akre
Leif Haendler
Inge Heus
Mats Olsson
Stefan Carlsson
Monique J Roobol
Gunnar Steineck
Peter Wiklund
Author Affiliation
Department of Urology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
BMJ. 2014;348:g1502
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Interactive/Multimedia
Keywords
Aged
Forecasting
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Propensity Score
Prostatectomy - methods
Prostatic Neoplasms - mortality - radiotherapy - surgery
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate - trends
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To compare the survival outcomes of patients treated with surgery or radiotherapy for prostate cancer.
Observational study.
Sweden, 1996-2010.
34,515 men primarily treated for prostate cancer with surgery (n=21,533) or radiotherapy (n=12,982). Patients were categorised by risk group (low, intermediate, high, and metastatic), age, and Charlson comorbidity score.
Cumulative incidence of mortality from prostate cancer and other causes. Competing risks regression hazard ratios for radiotherapy versus surgery were computed without adjustment and after propensity score and traditional (multivariable) adjustments, as well as after propensity score matching. Several sensitivity analyses were performed.
Prostate cancer mortality became a larger proportion of overall mortality as risk group increased for both the surgery and the radiotherapy cohorts. Among patients with non-metastatic prostate cancer the adjusted subdistribution hazard ratio for prostate cancer mortality favoured surgery (1.76, 95% confidence interval 1.49 to 2.08, for radiotherapy v prostatectomy), whereas there was no discernible difference in treatment effect among men with metastatic disease. Subgroup analyses indicated more clear benefits of surgery among younger and fitter men with intermediate and high risk disease. Sensitivity analyses confirmed the main findings.
This large observational study with follow-up to 15 years suggests that for most men with non-metastatic prostate cancer, surgery leads to better survival than does radiotherapy. Younger men and those with less comorbidity who have intermediate or high risk localised prostate cancer might have a greater benefit from surgery.
Notes
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Comment In: BMJ. 2014;348:g227124668778
Comment In: BMJ. 2014;348:g227324668697
Comment In: BMJ. 2014;348:g226624668796
Comment In: BMJ. 2014;348:g158024574475
Comment In: BMJ. 2014;348:g230524668764
PubMed ID
24574496 View in PubMed
Less detail

Contralateral mastectomy and survival after breast cancer in carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations: retrospective analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104996
Source
BMJ. 2014;348:g226
Publication Type
Article
Interactive/Multimedia
Date
2014
Author
Kelly Metcalfe
Shelley Gershman
Parviz Ghadirian
Henry T Lynch
Carrie Snyder
Nadine Tung
Charmaine Kim-Sing
Andrea Eisen
William D Foulkes
Barry Rosen
Ping Sun
Steven A Narod
Author Affiliation
Lawrence S Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Canada.
Source
BMJ. 2014;348:g226
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Interactive/Multimedia
Keywords
Adult
BRCA1 Protein - genetics - metabolism
BRCA2 Protein - genetics - metabolism
Breast Neoplasms - genetics - mortality - surgery
Canada - epidemiology
DNA, Neoplasm - genetics
Female
Forecasting
Humans
Mastectomy - methods - mortality
Middle Aged
Mutation
Neoplasm Staging
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate - trends
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
To compare the survival rates of women with BRCA associated breast cancer who did and did not undergo mastectomy of the contralateral breast.
Retrospective analysis.
12 cancer genetics clinics.
390 women with a family history of stage I or II breast cancer who were carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations and initially treated with unilateral or bilateral mastectomy. 181 patients had mastectomy of the contralateral breast. Patients were followed for up to 20 years from diagnosis.
Death from breast cancer.
79 women died of breast cancer in the follow-up period (18 in the bilateral mastectomy group and 61 in the unilateral mastectomy group). The median follow-up time was 14.3 years (range 0.1-20.0 years). At 20 years the survival rate for women who had mastectomy of the contralateral breast was 88% (95% confidence interval 83% to 93%) and for those who did not was 66% (59% to 73%). In a multivariable analysis, controlling for age at diagnosis, year of diagnosis, treatment, and other prognostic features, contralateral mastectomy was associated with a 48% reduction in death from breast cancer (hazard ratio 0.52, 95% confidence interval 0.29 to 0.93; P=0.03). In a propensity score adjusted analysis of 79 matched pairs, the association was not significant (0.60, 0.34 to 1.06; P=0.08). Based on these results, we predict that of 100 women treated with contralateral mastectomy, 87 will be alive at 20 years compared with 66 of 100 women treated with unilateral mastectomy.
This study suggests that women who are positive for BRCA mutations and who are treated for stage I or II breast cancer with bilateral mastectomy are less likely to die from breast cancer than women who are treated with unilateral mastectomy. Given the small number of events in this cohort, further research is required to confirm these findings.
Notes
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Comment In: BMJ. 2014;348:g137924519764
Comment In: BMJ. 2014;348:g186324603573
PubMed ID
24519767 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a population-based study in Krasnoyarsk region, Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272219
Source
Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2015;10:1781-6
Publication Type
Article
Interactive/Multimedia
Date
2015
Author
Ivan P Artyukhov
Irina L Arshukova
Elena A Dobretsova
Tatyana A Dugina
Andrey V Shulmin
Irina V Demko
Source
Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2015;10:1781-6
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Interactive/Multimedia
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Prognosis
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - diagnosis - epidemiology
Russia - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Krasnoyarsk region is a territory with the widespread risk factors for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) such as tobacco smoke, air pollution, and occupational exposure. An assessment of COPD prevalence based on medical diagnosis statistics underestimates the true COPD prevalence. This study aims to evaluate how medical examinations may increase the accuracy of estimates of COPD prevalence.
True COPD prevalence was estimated as a number of patients with the established disease diagnosis supplemented by the additional disease cases detected during medical examinations per 1,000 inhabitants of the region. Official medical statistics data and the data collected from the Global Alliance against Chronic Respiratory Diseases program 2011 among 15,000 inhabitants of the region aged 18 years and older were analyzed.
This study revealed the COPD cases without official medical diagnosis. The true prevalence of COPD is estimated to be two times higher than the prevalence estimates based on medical diagnosis statistics.
Undiagnosed and untreated cases of COPD result in severe COPD forms as well as addition of severe comorbidities. Because of this, there is an increase in the index of potential years of life lost. Conducting special medical examinations may increase the number of COPD cases detected at the early stages of the disease. This, in turn, may reduce the overall burden of the disease for the population of the region.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26366070 View in PubMed
Less detail

Factors Associated With Successful Resuscitation After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest and Temporal Trends in Survival and Comorbidity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264009
Source
Ann Emerg Med. 2015 May;65(5):523-531.e2
Publication Type
Article
Interactive/Multimedia
Date
May-2015
Author
Helle Søholm
Christian Hassager
Freddy Lippert
Matilde Winther-Jensen
Jakob Hartvig Thomsen
Hans Friberg
John Bro-Jeppesen
Lars Køber
Jesper Kjaergaard
Source
Ann Emerg Med. 2015 May;65(5):523-531.e2
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Interactive/Multimedia
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - mortality
Comorbidity
Databases, Factual
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Patient Admission
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest has an overall poor prognosis. We sought to identify what temporal trends and influencing factors existed for this condition in one region.
We studied consecutive out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients from 2007 to 2011 with attempted resuscitation in Copenhagen. From an Utstein database, we assessed survival to admission and comorbidity with the Charlson comorbidity index from the National Patient Registry and employment status from the Danish Rational Economic Agents Model database. We used logistic regression analyses to identify factors associated with outcome.
Of a total of 2,527 attempted resuscitations in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients, 40% (n=1,015) were successfully resuscitated and admitted to the hospital. The strongest independent factors associated with successful resuscitation were shockable primary rhythm (multivariate odds ratio [OR]=3.9; 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.1 to 5.0), witnessed arrest (multivariate OR=3.5; 95% CI 2.7 to 4.6), and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in a public area (multivariate OR=2.1; 95% CI 1.6 to 2.8), whereas no comorbidity (multivariate OR=1.1; 95% CI 0.8 to 1.45), sex (multivariate OR=1.14; 95% CI 0.91 to 1.44), and employment status (multivariate OR=1.17; 95% CI 0.89 to 1.56) were not independently associated with outcome. The number of patients with a high comorbidity burden (Charlson comorbidity index =3) increased during the study period (P trend
PubMed ID
25544733 View in PubMed
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Factors that predict response of patients with hepatitis C virus infection to boceprevir.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124081
Source
Gastroenterology. 2012 Sep;143(3):608-18.e1-5
Publication Type
Article
Interactive/Multimedia
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Fred Poordad
Jean-Pierre Bronowicki
Stuart C Gordon
Stefan Zeuzem
Ira M Jacobson
Mark S Sulkowski
Thierry Poynard
Timothy R Morgan
Cliona Molony
Lisa D Pedicone
Heather L Sings
Margaret H Burroughs
Vilma Sniukiene
Navdeep Boparai
Venkata S Goteti
Clifford A Brass
Janice K Albrecht
Bruce R Bacon
Author Affiliation
Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California, USA. poordad@txliver.com
Source
Gastroenterology. 2012 Sep;143(3):608-18.e1-5
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Interactive/Multimedia
Keywords
Adult
Antiviral agents - therapeutic use
Biological Markers - blood
Canada
Drug Therapy, Combination
Europe
Female
Genotype
Hepacivirus - drug effects - genetics - growth & development
Hepatitis C - diagnosis - drug therapy - genetics
Humans
Interferon-alpha - therapeutic use
Interleukins - genetics
Logistic Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Phenotype
Polyethylene Glycols - therapeutic use
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Proline - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Prospective Studies
RNA, Viral - blood
Recombinant Proteins - therapeutic use
Ribavirin - therapeutic use
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
United States
Viral Load
Abstract
Little is known about factors associated with a sustained virologic response (SVR) among patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection to treatment with protease inhibitors.
Previously untreated patients (from the Serine Protease Inhibitor Therapy 2 [SPRINT-2] trial) and those who did not respond to prior therapy (from the Retreatment with HCV Serine Protease Inhibitor Boceprevir and PegIntron/Rebetol 2 [RESPOND-2] trial) received either a combination of peginterferon and ribavirin for 48 weeks or boceprevir, peginterferon, and ribavirin (triple therapy) after 4 weeks of peginterferon and ribavirin (total treatment duration, 28-48 wk). A good response to interferon was defined as a = 1 log(10) decrease in HCV RNA at week 4; a poor response was defined as a
PubMed ID
22626609 View in PubMed
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Habitual alcohol consumption associated with reduced semen quality and changes in reproductive hormones; a cross-sectional study among 1221 young Danish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264037
Source
BMJ Open. 2014;4(9):e005462
Publication Type
Article
Interactive/Multimedia
Date
2014
Author
Tina Kold Jensen
Mads Gottschau
Jens Otto Broby Madsen
Anne-Maria Andersson
Tina Harmer Lassen
Niels E Skakkebæk
Shanna H Swan
Lærke Priskorn
Anders Juul
Niels Jørgensen
Source
BMJ Open. 2014;4(9):e005462
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Interactive/Multimedia
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Alcoholism - complications
Binge Drinking - complications
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Estradiol - blood
Follicle Stimulating Hormone - blood
Humans
Inhibins - blood
Luteinizing Hormone - blood
Male
Semen - drug effects
Semen Analysis
Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin - analysis
Sperm Count
Testosterone - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
Study associations between three measures of alcohol consumption (recent, typical/habitual, binging), semen quality and serum reproductive hormones.
Cross-sectional population based study.
1221 young Danish men, aged 18-28 years were recruited when they attended a compulsory medical examination to determine their fitness for military service from 2008 to 2012. Total alcohol consumption: (1) in the week preceding (habitual/typical) the visit (recent alcohol intake), (2) in a typical week and (3) frequency of 'binge drinking' (consuming more than 5 units/day)) in the past 30 days was estimated.
Semen quality (volume, sperm concentration, total sperm count, and percentages of motile and morphologically normal spermatozoa) and serum concentration of reproductive hormones (follicle-stimulating hormone, luteinising hormone, testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin, oestradiol, free testosterone and inhibin B).
Sperm concentration, total sperm count and percentage of spermatozoa with normal morphology were negatively associated with increasing habitual alcohol intake. This association was observed in men reporting at least 5 units in a typical week but was most pronounced for men with a typical intake of more than 25 units/week. Men with a typical weekly intake above 40 units had a 33% (95% CI 11% to 59%) reduction in sperm concentration compared to men with an intake of 1-5 units/week. A significant increase in serum free testosterone with increasing alcohol consumption the week preceding the visit was found. Binging was not independently associated with semen quality.
Our study suggests that even modest habitual alcohol consumption of more than 5 units per week had adverse effects on semen quality although most pronounced associations were seen in men who consumed more than 25 units per week. Alcohol consumption was also linked to changes in testosterone and SHBG levels. Young men should be advised to avoid habitual alcohol intake.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25277121 View in PubMed
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The influence of an Alaska Native accent and reputation on perceived therapist credibility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277713
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2015;22(1):27-41
Publication Type
Article
Interactive/Multimedia
Date
2015
Author
Joshua K Swift
Jenna Mayra
Chantel Justice
Brittany Freitas-Murrell
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2015;22(1):27-41
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Interactive/Multimedia
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska
Attitude to Health
Clinical Competence
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Middle Aged
Psychotherapy
Speech
Students
Young Adult
Abstract
In this study, we examined the influence of an Alaska Native (AN) accent and reputation on perceived therapist credibility after controlling for universal-diverse orientation. Participants listened to and rated therapist audio recordings that differed in AN accent (strong, minimal) and reputational cues (expert, recent graduate, student). While credibility ratings of the accent conditions did not differ in the expert and recent graduate scenarios, the graduate student therapist was seen as less attractive and useful when she spoke with a strong accent.
PubMed ID
25768389 View in PubMed
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It's About Time: A Survival Approach to Gestational Weight Gain and Preterm Delivery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279218
Source
Epidemiology. 2016 Mar;27(2):182-7
Publication Type
Article
Interactive/Multimedia
Date
Mar-2016

Luminal esophageal temperature monitoring with a deflectable esophageal temperature probe and intracardiac echocardiography may reduce esophageal injury during atrial fibrillation ablation procedures: results of a pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136981
Source
Circ Arrhythm Electrophysiol. 2011 Apr;4(2):149-56
Publication Type
Article
Interactive/Multimedia
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Luiz R Leite
Simone N Santos
Henrique Maia
Benhur D Henz
Fábio Giuseppin
Anderson Oliverira
André R Zanatta
Ayrton K Peres
Clarissa Novakoski
Jose R Barreto
Fabrício Vassalo
Andre d'Avila
Sheldon M Singh
Author Affiliation
Instituto Brasília de Arritmia, Brasilia, Brasil.
Source
Circ Arrhythm Electrophysiol. 2011 Apr;4(2):149-56
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Interactive/Multimedia
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Atrial Fibrillation - surgery - ultrasonography
Body temperature
Burns - diagnosis - etiology - prevention & control
Catheter Ablation - adverse effects - instrumentation
Catheters
Chi-Square Distribution
Equipment Design
Esophageal Fistula - diagnosis - etiology - prevention & control
Esophagoscopy
Esophagus - injuries - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Intraoperative - instrumentation - methods
Ontario
Pilot Projects
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Ulcer - diagnosis - etiology - prevention & control
Ultrasonography, Interventional - instrumentation
Abstract
Luminal esophageal temperature (LET) monitoring is one strategy to minimize esophageal injury during atrial fibrillation ablation procedures. However, esophageal ulceration and fistulas have been reported despite adequate LET monitoring. The objective of this study was to assess a novel approach to LET monitoring with a deflectable LET probe on the rate of esophageal injury in patients undergoing atrial fibrillation ablation.
Forty-five consecutive patients undergoing an atrial fibrillation ablation procedure followed by esophageal endoscopy were included in this prospective observational pilot study. LET monitoring was performed with a 7F deflectable ablation catheter that was positioned as close as possible to the site of left atrial ablation using the deflectable component of the catheter guided by visualization of its position on intracardiac echocardiography. Ablation in the posterior left atrial was limited to 25 W and terminated when the LET increased 2°C from baseline. Endoscopy was performed 1 to 2 days after the procedure. All patients had at least 1 LET elevation >2°C necessitating cessation of ablation. Deflection of the LET probe was needed to accurately measure LET in 5% of patients when ablating near the left pulmonary veins, whereas deflection of the LET probe was necessary in 88% of patients when ablating near the right pulmonary veins. The average maximum increase in LET was 2.5±1.5°C. No patients had esophageal thermal injury on follow-up endoscopy.
A strategy of optimal LET probe placement using a deflectable LET probe and intracardiac echocardiography guidance, combined with cessation of radiofrequency ablation with a 2°C rise in LET, may reduce esophageal thermal injury during left atrial ablation procedures.
PubMed ID
21325208 View in PubMed
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