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Acceptability of the POWERPLAY Program: A Workplace Health Promotion Intervention for Men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292610
Source
Am J Mens Health. 2017 Nov; 11(6):1809-1822
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2017
Author
Cherisse L Seaton
Joan L Bottorff
John L Oliffe
Margaret Jones-Bricker
Cristina M Caperchione
Steven T Johnson
Paul Sharp
Author Affiliation
1 Institute for Healthy Living and Chronic Disease Prevention, School of Nursing, Faculty of Health and Social Development, University of British Columbia, Kelowna, Canada.
Source
Am J Mens Health. 2017 Nov; 11(6):1809-1822
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
British Columbia
Health Behavior
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Men's health
Middle Aged
Occupational Health
Program Evaluation
Qualitative Research
Surveys and Questionnaires
Workplace
Young Adult
Abstract
The workplace health promotion program, POWERPLAY, was developed, implemented, and comprehensively evaluated among men working in four male-dominated worksites in northern British Columbia, Canada. The purpose of this study was to explore the POWERPLAY program's acceptability and gather recommendations for program refinement. The mixed-method study included end-of-program survey data collected from 103 male POWERPLAY program participants, interviews with workplace leads, and field notes recorded during program implementation. Data analyses involved descriptive statistics for quantitative data and inductive analysis of open-ended questions and qualitative data. Among participants, 70 (69%) reported being satisfied with the program, 51 (51%) perceived the program to be tailored for northern men, 56 (62%) believed the handouts provided useful information, and 75 (74%) would recommend this program to other men. The findings also highlight program implementation experiences with respect to employee engagement, feedback, and recommendations for future delivery. The POWERPLAY program provides an acceptable approach for health promotion that can serve as a model for advancing men's health in other contexts.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28884636 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adapting and enhancing PAX Good Behavior Game for First Nations communities: a mixed-methods study protocol developed with Swampy Cree Tribal Council communities in Manitoba.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294532
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 02 15; 8(2):e018454
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-15-2018
Author
Janique Fortier
Mariette Chartier
Sarah Turner
Nora Murdock
Frank Turner
Jitender Sareen
Tracie O Afifi
Laurence Y Katz
Marni Brownell
James Bolton
Brenda Elias
Corinne Isaak
Roberta Woodgate
Depeng Jiang
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 02 15; 8(2):e018454
Date
02-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Attitude
Child
Child Behavior
Child Behavior Disorders - ethnology - prevention & control
Cultural Competency
Female
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Manitoba
Mental health
Play and Playthings
Program Evaluation
Research Design
Residence Characteristics
Reward
School Health Services
Schools
Social Behavior
Social Behavior Disorders - ethnology - prevention & control
Abstract
High rates of mental health problems, such as suicidal behaviours, among First Nations youth in Canada are a major public health concern. The Good Behavior Game (GBG) is a school-based intervention that provides a nurturing environment for children and has been shown to promote positive outcomes. PAX Good Behavior Game (PAX GBG) is an adaptation and enhancement of the GBG. While PAX GBG has been implemented in Indigenous communities, little research exists examining the cultural and contextual appropriateness and effectiveness of the intervention in First Nations communities.
The present paper describes a protocol of the mixed-methods approach guided by an Indigenous ethical engagement model adopted to implement, adapt and evaluate PAX GBG in First Nations communities in Manitoba, Canada. First, implementation outcomes (eg, acceptability, adoption) of PAX GBG will be evaluated using qualitative interviews with teachers, principals and community members from Swampy Cree Tribal Council (SCTC) communities. Second, by linking administrative databases to programme data from schools in 38 First Nations communities, we will compare PAX GBG and control groups to evaluate whether PAX GBG is associated with improved mental health and academic outcomes. Third, the qualitative results will help inform a cultural and contextual adaptation of PAX GBG called First Nations PAX (FN PAX). Fourth, FN PAX will be implemented in a few SCTC communities and evaluated using surveys and qualitative interviews followed by the remaining communities the subsequent year.
Ethical approval was obtained from the University of Manitoba Health Research Ethics Board and will be obtained from the Health Information Privacy Committee and respective data providers for the administrative database linkages. Dissemination and knowledge translation will include community and stakeholder engagement throughout the research process, reports and presentations for policymakers and community members, presentations at scientific conferences and journal publications.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29449291 View in PubMed
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ADHD medication in offspring of immigrants - does the income level of the country of parental origin matter?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293027
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2018 01 08; 18(1):3
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-08-2018
Author
Arzu Arat
Viveca Östberg
Bo Burström
Anders Hjern
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, 171 76, Stockholm, Sweden. arzu.arat@chess.su.se.
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2018 01 08; 18(1):3
Date
01-08-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - drug therapy - economics - ethnology
Central Nervous System Stimulants - economics - therapeutic use
Child
Developing Countries
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Odds Ratio
Parents
Registries
Social Class
Sweden
Abstract
Child psychiatric treatment facilities vary greatly worldwide and are virtually non-existent in many low-income countries. One of the most common psychiatric disorders in childhood is ADHD, with an estimated prevalence of 3-5% in Sweden. Previous studies have shown a similar prevalence of ADHD in minority and majority children in Sweden and the UK. However, clinical studies demonstrated that children from immigrant families living in Sweden received less psychiatric care than those of native-born parents. We tested the hypothesis that the consumption of child psychiatric care in immigrant families would be determined by the availability of such treatment in the parents' country of origin. Patterns of medication for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) were studied as a proxy for child psychiatric care.
This was a register study of dispensed stimulant medication during 2013-2014 in Swedish national birth cohorts from 1995-2009. The study population, consisting of nearly 1.4 million children, was divided by national income of the parental country of origin and whether the parents were native Swedes, European immigrants, non-European immigrants or a mixture. Logistic regression was used to calculate the odds ratios of having been dispensed at least one ADHD drug during 2013, with adjustments for gender, family status indicating whether the child is living with both parents, household income and area of residence.
Having parents born in low-income (OR [95% confidence interval] 0.27 [0.24-0.29]) or middle-income (European: OR 0.23 [0.20-0.26], non-European: OR 0.39 [0.34-0.41]) countries was associated with lower ADHD treatment levels than having parents born in high-income countries (European: OR 0.60 [0.54-0.66], non-European: OR 0.68 [0.59-0.79]), when compared to children of parents born in Sweden. In families with a background in low or middle income countries, there was no significant association between household income and ADHD medication, while in children with Swedish and mixed backgrounds high level of disposable income was associated with lower levels of ADHD medication.
The use of child psychiatric care by immigrant families in Sweden was largely associated with the income level of the country of origin.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29310624 View in PubMed
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Allopurinol and risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia in a Finnish population-based cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296680
Source
Prostate Cancer Prostatic Dis. 2018 09; 21(3):373-378
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-2018
Author
Ville Kukko
Antti Kaipia
Kirsi Talala
Kimmo Taari
Teuvo L J Tammela
Anssi Auvinen
Teemu J Murtola
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. kukko.ville.t@student.uta.fi.
Source
Prostate Cancer Prostatic Dis. 2018 09; 21(3):373-378
Date
09-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Allopurinol - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Finland - epidemiology
Free Radical Scavengers - therapeutic use
Gout - drug therapy
Gout Suppressants - therapeutic use
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prostatic Hyperplasia - epidemiology - prevention & control
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Abstract
Metabolic syndrome and obesity are linked with hyperuricemia, and it has also been proposed that oxidative stress associated with hyperuricemia may promote benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). However, it is currently unknown whether use of antihyperuricemic medication is associated with risk of developing BPH. We studied the association between BPH and use of antihyperuricemic allopurinol in a Finnish population-based cohort.
The study cohort consisted of 74,754 men originally identified for the Finnish Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (FinRSPC). Information on gout and BPH medication usage (5a-reductase inhibitors, 5ARIs) during 1996-2014 was obtained from the National medication reimbursement database. Information on BPH diagnoses from in- and outpatient hospital visits and BPH-related surgery was obtained from the National Health Care Registry. Men with a record of BPH at baseline was excluded. We used Cox regression to analyze risk of starting BPH medication, having a recorded diagnosis or undergoing BPH surgery by allopurinol use with adjustment for age and simultaneous use of statins, antidiabetic or antihypertensive drugs and aspirin or other NSAIDs. Medication use was analyzed as a time-dependent variable to minimize immortal time bias.
Men using allopurinol had a decreased risk for all three BPH endpoints: BPH medication (HR 0.81; 95% CI 0.75-0.88), BPH diagnosis (HR 0.78; 95% CI 0.71-0.86) and BPH-related surgery (HR 0.67; 95% CI 0.58-0.76) after multivariable adjustment. The risk association did not change by cumulative use. The risk decrease disappeared after 1-2 years lag time. Only BMI modified the risk association; the risk decrease was observed only among men with BMI above the median (27.3?kg/m2); p for interaction
PubMed ID
29273728 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of the performance of SCORE Sweden 2015 in estimating cardiovascular risk: The Northern Sweden MONICA Study 1999-2014.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289826
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2017 01; 24(1):103-110
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Date
01-2017
Author
Tina Karjalainen
Martin Adiels
Lena Björck
Marie-Therèse Cooney
Ian Graham
Joep Perk
Annika Rosengren
Stefan Söderberg
Mats Eliasson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Sunderby Research Unit, Umeu University, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2017 01; 24(1):103-110
Date
01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Decision Support Techniques
Female
Health status
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Risk prediction models for cardiovascular death are important for providing advice on lifestyle and in decision-making regarding primary preventive drug treatment. The latest Swedish version of the Systematic COronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE 2015) has yet not been tested in the population.
The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of high and very high risk of fatal cardiovascular disease (CVD) of the current population according to 2015 SCORE Sweden and to evaluate the predictive accuracy of the 2003 Swedish version of SCORE (2003 SCORE Sweden) and 2015 SCORE Sweden in a population with declining CVD mortality.
We estimated the high and very high risk group for cardiovascular death for individuals 40-65 years of age in the 2014 Northern Sweden MONICA population survey excluding subjects with known diabetes or previous CVD (n?=?813). Using the 1999 MONICA survey (n?=?3347) followed up for 10 years for CVD mortality, we assessed the calibration of both 2003 and 2015 SCORE Sweden.
In 2014 2.6% of the population was considered at high or very high risk for fatal CVD, 95% were men and 76% were in the age group 60-65 years. Including subjects with a single markedly elevated risk factor, known diabetes or CVD, 12% of the population was at high or very high risk. During 10 years of follow-up of the 1999 cohort, 34 CVD deaths (24 men and 10 women) occurred. The 2003 SCORE overestimated the risk of death from CVD (ratio predicted/observed 2.3, P?
PubMed ID
27708071 View in PubMed
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A Cognitive Behavioural Intervention Programme to Improve Psychological Well-Being.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300041
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 12 29; 16(1):
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Date
12-29-2018
Author
Birgitta Ojala
Clas-Håkan Nygård
Heini Huhtala
Philip Bohle
Seppo T Nikkari
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Science, Health Unit, University of Tampere, 33014 Tampere, Finland. ojala.birgitta@gmail.com.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2018 12 29; 16(1):
Date
12-29-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Burnout, Professional - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology - therapy
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - methods
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health
Occupational Stress - epidemiology - therapy
Work Engagement
Workplace - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Psychosocial risk factors have increased in today's work environment, and they threaten work ability. Good workplace atmosphere, psychosocial support, the ability to cope with stress, and skills and knowledge are all connected to more successful coping. Faster changes in the work environment and an increased workload can lead to a chain of fatigue and illness. The aim of this study was to evaluate a cognitive behavioural intervention as an early rehabilitation strategy to improve employees' well-being, in intervention group N446 and in control group N116. The well-being measures used were the Bergen Burnout Inventory (BBI 15), Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES), and depression and stress screening questions. Data were obtained by a self-report survey at baseline and at a nine-month follow-up. Differences were analysed within and between groups. The results suggest that cognitive behavioural intervention as an early rehabilitation programme will increase employees' well-being measured by BBI 15, UWES, and depression and stress screening questions. In the intervention group, the total BBI 15 score (p
PubMed ID
30597940 View in PubMed
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Direct Molecular Detection and Genotyping of Borrelia burgdorferi Sensu Lato in Cerebrospinal Fluid of Children with Lyme Neuroborreliosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298100
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2018 05; 56(5):
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-2018
Author
Bjørn Barstad
Hanne Quarsten
Dag Tveitnes
Sølvi Noraas
Ingvild S Ask
Maryam Saeed
Franziskus Bosse
Grete Vigemyr
Ilka Huber
Knut Øymar
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway bjorn.barstad@sus.no.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2018 05; 56(5):
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Antibodies, Bacterial - cerebrospinal fluid
Borrelia burgdorferi Group - genetics - isolation & purification
Child
Child, Preschool
DNA, Bacterial - cerebrospinal fluid - genetics
Female
Genotype
Humans
Lyme Neuroborreliosis - cerebrospinal fluid - diagnosis
Male
Molecular Diagnostic Techniques - methods
Norway
Prospective Studies
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
The current diagnostic marker of Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB), the Borrelia burgdorferisensu lato antibody index (AI) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), has insufficient sensitivity in the early phase of LNB. We aimed to elucidate the diagnostic value of PCR for B. burgdorferisensu lato in CSF from children with symptoms suggestive of LNB and to explore B. burgdorferisensu lato genotypes associated with LNB in children. Children were prospectively included in predefined groups with a high or low likelihood of LNB based on diagnostic guidelines (LNB symptoms, CSF pleocytosis, and B. burgdorferisensu lato antibodies) or the detection of other causative agents. CSF samples were analyzed by two B. burgdorferisensu lato-specific real-time PCR assays and, if B. burgdorferisensu lato DNA was detected, were further analyzed by five singleplex real-time PCR assays for genotype determination. For children diagnosed as LNB patients (58 confirmed and 18 probable) (n = 76) or non-LNB controls (n = 28), the sensitivity and specificity of PCR for B. burgdorferisensu lato in CSF were 46% and 100%, respectively. B. burgdorferisensu lato DNA was detected in 26/58 (45%) children with AI-positive LNB and in 7/12 (58%) children with AI-negative LNB and symptoms of short duration. Among 36 children with detectable B. burgdorferisensu lato DNA, genotyping indicated Borrelia garinii (n = 27) and non-B. garinii (n = 1) genotypes, while 8 samples remained untyped. Children with LNB caused by B. garinii did not have a distinct clinical picture. The rate of detection of B. burgdorferisensu lato DNA in the CSF of children with LNB was higher than that reported previously. PCR for B. burgdorferisensu lato could be a useful supplemental diagnostic tool in unconfirmed LNB cases with symptoms of short duration. B. garinii was the predominant genotype in children with LNB.
PubMed ID
29467195 View in PubMed
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Drug helplines and adult marijuana users: An assessment in Washington, Colorado, Oregon, and Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296228
Source
Subst Abus. 2018 01 02; 39(1):3-5
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Letter
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-02-2018
Author
Beatriz H Carlini
Sharon B Garrett
Author Affiliation
a Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute , University of Washington , Seattle , Washington , USA.
Source
Subst Abus. 2018 01 02; 39(1):3-5
Date
01-02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Letter
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Colorado
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hotlines - standards
Humans
Marijuana Smoking - psychology
Oregon
Patient Simulation
Program Evaluation - statistics & numerical data
Washington
Abstract
Drug helplines are well-known and widely utilized resources for those seeking help with managing their substance use. Using "secret shoppers," a preliminary assessment of the drug helplines in 4 states was performed. Eleven calls were placed to the helpline staff, where the secret shopper posed as an adult users of marijuana interested in decreasing their marijuana use and asked questions about cannabinoids and methods of marijuana consumption. In 100% of the calls placed, helpline staff had no knowledge about the effects and interactions of marijuana's 2 main components (tetrahydrocannabinol [THC] and cannabidiol [CBD]), neither could they explain the risk differential of smoking, eating, or vaporizing marijuana. In all but one of the calls placed, helpline responders were respectful and empathic. The assessment suggests that drug helplines are equipped with a respectful, empathetic, and nonjudgmental staff who lack important knowledge to best serve those seeking help for marijuana use.
PubMed ID
28715253 View in PubMed
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Effect of on-farm interventions in the aftermath of an outbreak of hypervirulent verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291964
Source
Vet Rec. 2018 05 05; 182(18):516
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Date
05-05-2018
Author
Lena-Mari Tamminen
Helena Fransson
Madeleine Tråvén
Anna Aspán
Stefan Alenius
Ulf Emanuelson
Ilmars Dreimanis
Mats Törnquist
Erik Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Section of Ruminant Medicine and Epidemiology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Vet Rec. 2018 05 05; 182(18):516
Date
05-05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Keywords
Abattoirs
Animals
Cattle
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Escherichia coli Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Escherichia coli O157 - isolation & purification
Farms
Food Microbiology
Humans
Meat - microbiology
Prevalence
Shiga-Toxigenic Escherichia coli - isolation & purification
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In 2007, human infections with a hypervirulent strain of verocytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 increased in Sweden and especially in the Halland County. A connection between the cases and a local beef cattle farm with an on-farm abattoir and meat processing plant was established. In this observational study the control measures implemented on the infected farm and the dynamics of infection in the herd are described. In May 2008, when measures were initiated and animals put to pasture, the prevalence of positive individuals was 40 per cent and 18 carcasses out of 24 slaughtered animals were contaminated. During summer the monthly prevalence of positive carcasses varied between 8 and 41 per cent?and at turning-in 22 out of 258 individually sampled animals were shedding the pathogen. After January 2009 no positive carcasses were found at slaughter and follow-up samplings of environment and individuals remained negative until the study period ended in May 2010. The results indicate that on-farm measures have potential to reduce the prevalence of the pathogen in a long-term perspective. However, as self-clearance cannot be excluded the effectiveness of the suggested measures needs to be confirmed.
PubMed ID
29445014 View in PubMed
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Efficiency of Colorectal Cancer Surveillance in Patients with Ulcerative Colitis: 38 Years' Experience in a Patient Cohort from a Defined Population Area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290771
Source
Scand J Surg. 2017 Jun; 106(2):133-138
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
M Rutegård
R Palmqvist
R Stenling
J Lindberg
J Rutegård
Author Affiliation
1 Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Surg. 2017 Jun; 106(2):133-138
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Colectomy - methods
Colitis, Ulcerative - epidemiology - pathology - surgery
Colonoscopy - methods
Colorectal Neoplasms - pathology - prevention & control
Databases, Factual
Early Detection of Cancer - methods
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Precancerous Conditions - epidemiology - pathology
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Ulcerative colitis increases the risk of developing colorectal cancer. Colonoscopic surveillance is recommended although there are no randomized trials evaluating the efficacy of such a strategy. This study is an update of earlier studies from an ongoing colonoscopic surveillance program.
All patients with ulcerative colitis were invited to the surveillance program that started in 1977 at Örnsköldsvik Hospital, located in the northern part of Sweden. Five principal endoscopists performed the colonoscopies and harvested mucosal sampling for histopathological evaluation. Some 323 patients from the defined catchment area were studied from 1977 to 2014. At the end of the study period, 130 patients, including those operated on, had had total colitis for more than 10?years.
In total, 1481 colonoscopies were performed on 323 patients during the study period without any major complications. In all, 10 cases of colorectal cancer were diagnosed in 9 patients, of whom 1 died from colorectal cancer. The cumulative incidence of colorectal cancer was 1.4% at 10?years, 2.0% at 20?years, 3.0% at 30?years, and 9.4% at 40?years of disease duration, respectively. The standardized colorectal cancer incidence ratio was 3.01 (95% confidence interval: 1.42-5.91). Major surgery was performed on 65 patients; for 20 of these, the indication for surgery was dysplasia or colorectal cancer. Panproctocolectomy was performed in 43 patients.
This study supports that colonoscopic surveillance is a safe and effective long-term measure to detect dysplasia and progression to cancer. The low numbers of colorectal cancer-related deaths in our study suggest that early detection of neoplasia and adequate surgical intervention within a surveillance program may reduce colorectal cancer mortality in ulcerative colitis patients.
PubMed ID
27431978 View in PubMed
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