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Absolute rather than relative income is a better socioeconomic predictor of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Swedish adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292715
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2017 05 04; 16(1):70
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-04-2017
Author
Sten Axelsson Fisk
Juan Merlo
Author Affiliation
Unit for Social Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, CRC, Jan Waldeströms gata, 35, S-205 02, Malmö, Sweden. sten.axelsson_fisk@med.lu.se.
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2017 05 04; 16(1):70
Date
05-04-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Female
Humans
Incidence
Income - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Poverty - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - economics - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
While psychosocial theory claims that socioeconomic status (SES), acting through social comparisons, has an important influence on susceptibility to disease, materialistic theory says that socioeconomic position (SEP) and related access to material resources matter more. However, the relative role of SEP versus SES in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) risk has still not been examined.
We investigated the association between SES/SEP and COPD risk among 667 094 older adults, aged 55 to 60, residing in Sweden between 2006 and 2011. Absolute income in five groups by population quintiles depicted SEP and relative income expressed as quintile groups within each absolute income group represented SES. We performed sex-stratified logistic regression models to estimate odds ratios and the area under the receiver operator curve (AUC) to compare the discriminatory accuracy of SES and SEP in relation to COPD.
Even though both absolute (SEP) and relative income (SES) were associated with COPD risk, only absolute income (SEP) presented a clear gradient, so the poorest had a three-fold higher COPD risk than the richest individuals. While the AUC for a model including only age was 0.54 and 0.55 when including relative income (SES), it increased to 0.65 when accounting for absolute income (SEP). SEP rather than SES demonstrated a consistent association with COPD.
Our study supports the materialistic theory. Access to material resources seems more relevant to COPD risk than the consequences of low relative income.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28472960 View in PubMed
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Accumulated exposure to unemployment is related to impaired glucose metabolism in middle-aged men: A follow-up of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291192
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2017 Aug; 11(4):365-372
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Nina Rautio
Tuulia Varanka-Ruuska
Eeva Vaaramo
Saranya Palaniswamy
Rozenn Nedelec
Jouko Miettunen
Jaro Karppinen
Juha Auvinen
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Sirkka Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
Sylvain Sebert
Leena Ala-Mursula
Author Affiliation
Center for Life Course Health Research, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, 90014 Oulu, Finland; Unit of Primary Health Care, Oulu University Hospital, OYS, P.O. Box 20, 90029 Oulu, Finland. Electronic address: nina.rautio@oulu.fi.
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2017 Aug; 11(4):365-372
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Chi-Square Distribution
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Prediabetic State - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Registries
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Time Factors
Unemployment
Abstract
We explored whether registered unemployment is associated with impaired glucose metabolism in general population.
Based on Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 at 46 years, we analyzed the oral glucose tolerance tests of 1970 men and 2544 women in relation to their preceding three-year employment records in three categories of unemployment exposure: no (employed), low (=1-year) and high exposure (>1-year).
Among men, pre-diabetes was found in 19.2% of those with no unemployment, 23.0% with low and 27.0% with high exposure, the corresponding figures for screen-detected type 2 diabetes were 3.8%, 3.8% and 9.2% (p
Notes
CommentIn: Prim Care Diabetes. 2018 Feb;12 (1):92 PMID 28807657
PubMed ID
28456438 View in PubMed
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The Accuracy of the Computed Tomography Diagnosis of Acute Appendicitis: Does the Experience of the Radiologist Matter?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294920
Source
Scand J Surg. 2018 Mar; 107(1):43-47
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Mar-2018
Author
E Lietzén
P Salminen
I Rinta-Kiikka
H Paajanen
T Rautio
P Nordström
M Aarnio
T Rantanen
J Sand
J-P Mecklin
A Jartti
J Virtanen
P Ohtonen
N Ånäs
J M Grönroos
Author Affiliation
1 Division of Digestive Surgery and Urology, Department of Acute and Digestive Surgery, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
Source
Scand J Surg. 2018 Mar; 107(1):43-47
Date
Mar-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Appendectomy - methods
Appendicitis - diagnostic imaging - drug therapy - surgery
Clinical Competence
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Radiologists
Risk assessment
Tomography, X-Ray Computed - methods
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
To assess the accuracy of computed tomography in diagnosing acute appendicitis with a special reference to radiologist experience.
Data were collected prospectively in our randomized controlled trial comparing surgery and antibiotic treatment for uncomplicated acute appendicitis (APPAC trial, NCT01022567). We evaluated 1065 patients who underwent computed tomography for suspected appendicitis. The on-call radiologist preoperatively analyzed these computed tomography images. In this study, the radiologists were divided into experienced (consultants) and inexperienced (residents) ones, and the comparison of interpretations was made between these two radiologist groups.
Out of the 1065 patients, 714 had acute appendicitis and 351 had other or no diagnosis on computed tomography. There were 700 true-positive, 327 true-negative, 14 false-positive, and 24 false-negative cases. The sensitivity and the specificity of computed tomography were 96.7% (95% confidence interval, 95.1-97.8) and 95.9% (95% confidence interval, 93.2-97.5), respectively. The rate of false computed tomography diagnosis was 4.2% for experienced consultant radiologists and 2.2% for inexperienced resident radiologists (p?=?0.071). Thus, the experience of the radiologist had no effect on the accuracy of computed tomography diagnosis.
The accuracy of computed tomography in diagnosing acute appendicitis was high. The experience of the radiologist did not improve the diagnostic accuracy. The results emphasize the role of computed tomography as an accurate modality in daily routine diagnostics for acute appendicitis in all clinical emergency settings.
PubMed ID
28929862 View in PubMed
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Acute and overuse injuries among sports club members and non-members: the Finnish Health Promoting Sports Club (FHPSC) study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299711
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2019 Jan 19; 20(1):32
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Jan-19-2019
Author
L Ristolainen
K Toivo
J Parkkari
S Kokko
L Alanko
O J Heinonen
R Korpelainen
K Savonen
H Selänne
T Vasankari
L Kannas
J Villberg
U M Kujala
Author Affiliation
Orton Orthopaedic Hospital, Orton, Helsinki, Finland. leena.ristolainen@hotmail.fi.
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2019 Jan 19; 20(1):32
Date
Jan-19-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Athletic Injuries - diagnosis - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Cumulative Trauma Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Exercise - physiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Male
Risk factors
Sports - physiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Physical activity in adolescence is promoted for its multi-dimensional health benefits. However, too intensive sports participation is associated with an increased injury risk. Our aim was to compare the occurrence of acute and overuse injuries in Finnish sports club members and non-members and to report training and competing habits associated with a higher injury risk in sports club members.
In this cross-sectional survey targeted at 14-16-year-old adolescents, a structured questionnaire was completed by 1077 sports club members and 812 non-members. The main outcome measures were self-reported acute and overuse injuries, their location and type.
At least one acute injury in the past year was reported by 44.0% of sports club members and 19.8% of non-members (P?
PubMed ID
30660197 View in PubMed
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Adverse drug reaction reporting: how can drug consumption information add to analyses using spontaneous reports?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294818
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2018 Apr; 74(4):497-504
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Kristian Svendsen
Kjell H Halvorsen
Solveig Vorren
Hilde Samdal
Beate Garcia
Author Affiliation
Tromsø Hospital Pharmacy, University Hospital of North Norway, N-9038, Tromsø, Norway. kristian.0411@gmail.com.
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2018 Apr; 74(4):497-504
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Atorvastatin Calcium - adverse effects
Central Nervous System Stimulants - adverse effects
Databases, Factual
Drug Utilization Review
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - adverse effects
Male
Methylphenidate - adverse effects
Norway - epidemiology
Pharmaceutical Services
Pharmacovigilance
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Simvastatin - adverse effects
Abstract
Spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) is a cornerstone in pharmacovigilance. However, information about the underlying consumption of drugs is rarely used when analysing spontaneous reports. The purpose of this study was to combine ADR reports with drug consumption data to demonstrate the additional information this gives in various scenarios, comparing different drugs, gender-stratified sub-populations and changes in reporting over time.
We combined all Norwegian ADR reports in 2004-2013 from the EudraVigilance database (n?=?14.028) with dispensing data from the Norwegian Prescription Database (more than 800 million dispensed prescriptions during 2004-2013). This was done in order to calculate drug-specific consumption-adjusted adverse drug reaction reporting rates (CADRRs) by dividing the number of reports for each drug with the number of users of the drug during the same time period.
Among the ten drugs with the highest number of ADR reports and the ten drugs with the highest CADRR, only four drugs were in both categories. This indicates that drugs with a high number of reports often also have a high number of users and that CADRR captures drugs with potentially relevant safety issues but a smaller number of users. Comparing reported ADRs in females and males using methylphenidate, we found that the two groups report different ADRs. Finally, we showed that changes in ADR reporting for simvastatin and atorvastatin during 2004-2013 were due to changes in consumption and that atorvastatin had a higher CADRR but fewer reports than simvastatin.
CADRR provides additional information compared with number of reports alone in studies using spontaneous reports. It is important for researchers to adjust for consumption whenever possible in pharmacovigilance studies.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29255992 View in PubMed
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Adverse Neonatal Outcomes in Overweight and Obese Adolescents Compared with Normal Weight Adolescents and Low Risk Adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299300
Source
J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol. 2019 Apr; 32(2):139-145
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2019
Author
Anna Ramö Isgren
Preben Kjølhede
Marie Blomberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol. 2019 Apr; 32(2):139-145
Date
Apr-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body mass index
Body Weight
Cohort Studies
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Pediatric Obesity - complications
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - etiology
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Pregnancy in Adolescence - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
To evaluate the association between maternal body mass index and neonatal outcomes in adolescents and to compare neonatal outcomes between overweight and obese adolescents and obstetric low-risk adult women.
Retrospective cohort study using data from the Swedish Medical Birth Register.
Sweden.
All 31,386 primiparous adolescents younger than 20 years of age and 178,844 "standard" women, defined as normal weight, obstetric low-risk adult women who delivered between 1992 and 2013. The adolescents were categorized according to weight and height in early pregnancy into body mass index groups according to the World Health Organization classification. Logistic regression models were used.
Neonatal outcomes in relation to maternal body mass index groups.
In the adolescents, 6109/31,386 (19.5%) and 2287/31,386 (7.3%) were overweight and obese, respectively. Compared with normal weight adolescents, overweight adolescents had a lower risk of having small for gestational age neonates, and higher risks for having neonates with macrosomia, and being large for gestational age and with Apgar score less than 7 at 5 minutes. The obese adolescents had increased risk for having neonates being large for gestational age (3.8% vs 1.3%; adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.97 [95% confidence interval (CI), 2.30-3.84]), with macrosomia (>4500 g) (4.6% vs 1.4%; aOR, 2.95 [95% CI, 2.33-3.73]), and with Apgar score less than 7 at 5 minutes (2.2% vs 1.1%; aOR, 1.98 [95% CI, 1.43-2.76]) than normal weight adolescents. Compared with the standard women, overweight and obese adolescents had overall more adverse neonatal outcomes.
Overweight and obese adolescents had predominantly increased risks for adverse neonatal outcomes compared with normal weight adolescents and standard women.
PubMed ID
30453030 View in PubMed
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Adverse reactions to tattoos in the general population of Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297616
Source
J Am Acad Dermatol. 2018 Oct; 79(4):770-772
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2018
Author
Rie Dybboe Bjerre
Nina Heede Ulrich
Allan Linneberg
Jeanne Duus Johansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology and Allergy, National Allergy Research Centre, Herlev-Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: rie.dybboe.bjerre@regionh.dk.
Source
J Am Acad Dermatol. 2018 Oct; 79(4):770-772
Date
Oct-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Risk assessment
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Tattooing - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
PubMed ID
29614242 View in PubMed
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Aerobic physical activity assessed with accelerometer, diary, questionnaire, and interview in a Finnish population sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295378
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2018 Oct; 28(10):2196-2206
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2018
Author
Henna Hukkanen
Pauliina Husu
Harri Sievänen
Kari Tokola
Henri Vähä-Ypyä
Heli Valkeinen
Tomi Mäki-Opas
Jaana H Suni
Tommi Vasankari
Author Affiliation
The UKK Institute for Health Promotion Research, Tampere, Finland.
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2018 Oct; 28(10):2196-2206
Date
Oct-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Accelerometry
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Data Collection - methods
Exercise
Female
Finland
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oligopeptides
Self Report
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
This study evaluates the agreement between different methods to assess moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in a large sample of Finnish adults. Methods were classified and examined pairwise (accelerometer vs diary; questionnaire vs interview). Proportion of participants meeting the aerobic health-enhancing physical activity (HEPA) recommendation was compared pairwise between all four methods. The present study of 1916 adults aged 18-75 years (mean age 50 years, 57% women) is a sub-sample of population-based Health 2011 Study conducted by the National Institute of Health and Welfare in Finland. Participants used accelerometer for 7 days and completed physical activity (PA) diary during the same period. PA questionnaire and interview were completed retrospectively to assess typical weekly PA over the past year. Agreement between the methods was analyzed with paired samples t-test and Bland-Altman plot. Kappa-test was used to compare the prevalence of meeting the HEPA recommendation. The accelerometer resulted in 13 minutes (P 
PubMed ID
29923623 View in PubMed
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Age-specific incidence of new asthma diagnoses in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296726
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract. 2017 Jan - Feb; 5(1):189-191.e3
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Letter
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Author
Hannu Kankaanranta
Leena E Tuomisto
Pinja Ilmarinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Respiratory Medicine, Seinäjoki Central Hospital, Seinäjoki, Finland; Department of Respiratory Medicine, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. Electronic address: hannu.kankaanranta@epshp.fi.
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract. 2017 Jan - Feb; 5(1):189-191.e3
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Letter
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Asthma - diagnosis
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Reimbursement Mechanisms
PubMed ID
27765463 View in PubMed
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Alcohol-attributed disease burden and alcohol policies in the BRICS-countries during the years 1990-2013.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290723
Source
J Glob Health. 2017 Jun; 7(1):010404
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2017
Author
Rynaz Rabiee
Emilie Agardh
Matthew M Coates
Peter Allebeck
Anna-Karin Danielsson
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Public Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Glob Health. 2017 Jun; 7(1):010404
Date
Jun-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - blood - trends
Alcohol-Related Disorders - epidemiology - mortality
Brazil
China
Cost of Illness
Disabled Persons
Evidence-Based Practice
Female
Humans
India
Male
Public Policy
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Russia
South Africa
Abstract
We aimed to assess alcohol consumption and alcohol-attributed disease burden by DALYs (disability adjusted life years) in the BRICS countries (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) between 1990 and 2013, and explore to what extent these countries have implemented evidence-based alcohol policies during the same time period.
A comparative risk assessment approach and literature review, within a setting of the BRICS countries. Participants were the total populations (males and females combined) of each country. Levels of alcohol consumption, age-standardized alcohol-attributable DALYs per 100?000 and alcohol policy documents were measured.
The alcohol-attributed disease burden mirrors level of consumption in Brazil, Russia and India, to some extent in China, but not in South Africa. Between the years 1990-2013 DALYs per 100 000 decreased in Brazil (from 2124 to 1902), China (from 1719 to 1250) and South Africa (from 2926 to 2662). An increase was observed in Russia (from 4015 to 4719) and India (from 1574 to 1722). Policies were implemented in all of the BRICS countries and the most common were tax increases, drink-driving measures and restrictions on advertisement.
There was an overall decrease in alcohol-related DALYs in Brazil, China and South Africa, while an overall increase was observed in Russia and India. Most notably is the change in DALYs in Russia, where a distinct increase from 1990-2005 was followed by a steady decrease from 2005-2013. Even if assessment of causality cannot be done, policy changes were generally followed by changes in alcohol-attributed disease burden. This highlights the importance of more detailed research on this topic.
Notes
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