Skip header and navigation

Refine By

38 records – page 1 of 4.

Agreement between mothers', fathers', and teachers' ratings of behavioural and emotional problems in 3-5-year-old children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299314
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(11):e0206752
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Elisabet Fält
Thomas Wallby
Anna Sarkadi
Raziye Salari
Helena Fabian
Author Affiliation
Child Health and Parenting (CHAP), Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(11):e0206752
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Child Behavior
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis
Child, Preschool
Emotions
Fathers - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Mothers - psychology
Observer Variation
Problem behavior
School Teachers - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), a valid and reliable instrument for measuring children's mental health, is available in parent- and teacher versions, making it an ideal tool for assessing behavioural and emotional problems in young children. However, few studies have evaluated inter-parent agreement on the SDQ, and in most studies on SDQ agreement, parent scores are either provided by only one parent or have been combined into one parent score. Furthermore, studies on SDQ inter-rater agreement usually only reflect degree of correlation, leaving the agreement between measurements unknown. The aim of the present study was therefore to examine both degree of correlation and agreement between parent and teacher SDQ reports, in a community sample of preschool-aged children in Sweden.
Data were obtained from the Children and Parents in Focus trial. The sample comprised 4,469 children 3-5-years-old. Mothers, fathers and preschool teachers completed the SDQ as part of the routine health check-ups at Child Health Centres. Inter-rater agreement was measured using Pearson correlation coefficient and intraclass correlation (ICC).
Results revealed poor/fair agreement between parent and teacher ratings (ICC 0.25-0.54) and good/excellent agreement between mother and father ratings (ICC 0.66-0.76). The highest level of agreement between parents and teachers was found for the hyperactivity and peer problem subscales, whereas the strongest agreement between parents was found for the hyperactivity and conduct subscales.
Low inter-rater agreement between parent and teacher ratings suggests that information from both teachers and parents is important when using the SDQ as a method to identify mental health problems in preschool children. Although mothers and fathers each provide unique information about their child's behaviour, good inter-parent agreement indicates that a single parent informant may be sufficient and simplify data collection.
PubMed ID
30383861 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aseptic loosening after total hip arthroplasty and the risk of cardiovascular disease: A nested case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299119
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(11):e0204391
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Agata Rysinska
Olof Sköldenberg
Anne Garland
Ola Rolfson
Sara Aspberg
Thomas Eisler
Göran Garellick
Andreas Stark
Nils Hailer
Max Gordon
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Sciences at Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(11):e0204391
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip
Cerebral Infarction - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Heart Failure - epidemiology - etiology
Hip Prosthesis - adverse effects
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Cardiovascular
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology
Osteolysis - epidemiology - etiology
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Patients with surgically treated osteoarthritis of the hip have an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality many years after the operation compared with controls. Our hypothesis is that this increased risk after total hip arthroplasty (THA) is mediated by development of periprosthetic osteolysis leading to aseptic loosening of the implant.
We conducted a nation-wide, nested, case-control study consisting of patients receiving a cemented THA due to osteoarthritis between the years 1992 and 2005. Our study population included a total of 14,430 subjects identified in the Swedish hip arthroplasty register and linked to the Swedish National Patient Register. The case group consisted of patients (n = 2,886) who underwent reoperation of the treated hip due to osteolysis or aseptic loosening at any time within five years after the index surgery. Each case was matched with four controls (n = 11,544) who had not undergone reoperation. The main outcomes were cardiovascular events i.e. myocardial infarction, heart failure and cerebral infarction according to ICD-codes and time to the first cardiovascular event during the exposure period. Outcomes were subgrouped into cardiac and cerebral events. We used regression models to calculate the incidence rates and adjusted our results for confounders.
Overall, 5.1% of patients had cardiac events, with slightly more overall cardiovascular events occurring in the control group (8.1% vs. 6.7%, odds ratio 0.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.7 to 1.0). After adjusting for confounders, the case group had an increased relative risk of 1.3 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1 to 1.3) for total number of cardiovascular events. Similar effect sizes were observed for time to first event.
Patients with osteoarthritis who received THA and subsequently underwent a revision operation due to loosening had a higher relative risk of developing cardiovascular events than controls. Thus there is an association which could be explained by a common inflammatory disease pathway that requires further experimental research.
PubMed ID
30427844 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of genetic polymorphisms with age at menarche in Russian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297458
Source
Gene. 2019 Feb 20; 686:228-236
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Date
Feb-20-2019
Author
Irina Ponomarenko
Evgeny Reshetnikov
Oksana Altuchova
Alexey Polonikov
Inna Sorokina
Anna Yermachenko
Volodymyr Dvornyk
Oleg Golovchenko
Mikhail Churnosov
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Biological Disciplines, Belgorod State University, 308015 Belgorod, Russia.
Source
Gene. 2019 Feb 20; 686:228-236
Date
Feb-20-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Female
Humans
Menarche - genetics
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Russia
Abstract
Examine the association of genetic polymorphisms with age at menarche (AAM) in Russian women.
A total of 1613 Russian females were recruited for the study. Fifty two polymorphisms were analyzed for their association with AAM, height, and BMI. The associations were analyzed assuming the additive, dominant, and recessive models and using the log-linear regression as implemented in PLINK v. 2.050. The 2-, 3-, and 4-loci models of gene-gene interactions were analyzed using the MB-MDR method and validated by the permutation test.
Genetic polymorphism rs6438424 3q13.32 was independently associated with AAM in Russian women. In addition, 14 SNPs were determined as possible contributors to this trait through gene-gene interactions.
The obtained results suggest that 14 out of 52 studied polymorphisms may contribute to AAM in Russian women. The rs6438424 3q13.32 polymorphism was associated with AAM according to both additive and dominant models (?perm?=?0.005). In total 12 two-, three-, and four-locus models of gene-gene interactions were determined as contributing to AAM (pperm?=?0.006). Nine of the 14 AAM-associated SNPs are also associated with height and BMI (pperm?=?0.003). Among 14 AAM-associated SNPs (a priori all having regulatory significance), the highest regulatory potential was determined for rs4633 COMT, rs2164808 POMC, rs2252673INSR, rs6438424 3q13.32, and rs10769908 STK33. Eleven loci are cis-eQTL and affect expression of 14 genes in various tissues and organs (FDR?
PubMed ID
30453067 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of polymorphisms near the FOXC2 gene with the risk of varicose veins in ethnic Russians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289576
Source
Phlebology. 2016 Oct; 31(9):640-8
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Alexandra S Shadrina
Mariya A Smetanina
Ekaterina A Sokolova
Kseniya S Sevost'ianova
Andrey I Shevela
Marina Y Demekhova
Oleg A Shonov
Evgenii A Ilyukhin
Elena N Voronina
Igor A Zolotukhin
Alexander I Kirienko
Maxim L Filipenko
Author Affiliation
Institute of Chemical Biology and Fundamental Medicine, Novosibirsk, Russia Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk, Russia weiner.alexserg@gmail.com.
Source
Phlebology. 2016 Oct; 31(9):640-8
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Female
Forkhead Transcription Factors - genetics
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Haplotypes
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Genetic
Risk factors
Russia - ethnology
Varicose Veins - ethnology - genetics
Abstract
To investigate the association of polymorphisms located near the FOXC2 gene with the risk of varicose veins in ethnic Russians.
Allele, genotype, and haplotype frequencies were determined in the sample of 474 patients with primary varicose veins and in the control group of 478 individuals without a history of chronic venous disease.
Polymorphisms rs7189489, rs4633732, and rs1035550 showed the association with the increased risk of varicose veins, but none of the observed associations remained significant after correction for multiple testing. Haplotype analysis revealed the association of haplotype rs7189489 C-rs4633732 T-rs34221221 C-rs1035550 C-rs34152738 T-rs12711457 G with the increased risk of varicose veins (OR?=?2.67, P?=?0.01).
Our results provide evidence that the studied polymorphisms do not play a major role in susceptibility to varicose veins development in the Russian population.
PubMed ID
26420053 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of polymorphisms near the FOXC2 gene with the risk of varicose veins in ethnic Russians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289734
Source
Phlebology. 2016 Oct; 31(9):640-8
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2016
Author
Alexandra S Shadrina
Mariya A Smetanina
Ekaterina A Sokolova
Kseniya S Sevost'ianova
Andrey I Shevela
Marina Y Demekhova
Oleg A Shonov
Evgenii A Ilyukhin
Elena N Voronina
Igor A Zolotukhin
Alexander I Kirienko
Maxim L Filipenko
Author Affiliation
Institute of Chemical Biology and Fundamental Medicine, Novosibirsk, Russia Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk, Russia weiner.alexserg@gmail.com.
Source
Phlebology. 2016 Oct; 31(9):640-8
Date
Oct-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Female
Forkhead Transcription Factors - genetics
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Haplotypes
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Genetic
Risk factors
Russia - ethnology
Varicose Veins - ethnology - genetics
Abstract
To investigate the association of polymorphisms located near the FOXC2 gene with the risk of varicose veins in ethnic Russians.
Allele, genotype, and haplotype frequencies were determined in the sample of 474 patients with primary varicose veins and in the control group of 478 individuals without a history of chronic venous disease.
Polymorphisms rs7189489, rs4633732, and rs1035550 showed the association with the increased risk of varicose veins, but none of the observed associations remained significant after correction for multiple testing. Haplotype analysis revealed the association of haplotype rs7189489 C-rs4633732 T-rs34221221 C-rs1035550 C-rs34152738 T-rs12711457 G with the increased risk of varicose veins (OR?=?2.67, P?=?0.01).
Our results provide evidence that the studied polymorphisms do not play a major role in susceptibility to varicose veins development in the Russian population.
PubMed ID
26420053 View in PubMed
Less detail

Blood hsa-miR-122-5p and hsa-miR-885-5p levels associate with fatty liver and related lipoprotein metabolism-The Young Finns Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292130
Source
Sci Rep. 2016 12 05; 6:38262
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-05-2016
Author
Emma Raitoharju
Ilkka Seppälä
Leo-Pekka Lyytikäinen
Jorma Viikari
Mika Ala-Korpela
Pasi Soininen
Antti J Kangas
Melanie Waldenberger
Norman Klopp
Thomas Illig
Jaana Leiviskä
Britt-Marie Loo
Niku Oksala
Mika Kähönen
Nina Hutri-Kähönen
Reijo Laaksonen
Olli Raitakari
Terho Lehtimäki
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Chemistry, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Fimlab Laboratories, and University of Tampere, School of Medicine, Tampere, Finland.
Source
Sci Rep. 2016 12 05; 6:38262
Date
12-05-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Fatty Liver - blood - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Genome-Wide Association Study
Humans
Lipoproteins - blood
Male
MicroRNAs - blood
Middle Aged
Ultrasonography
Abstract
MicroRNAs are involved in disease development and may be utilized as biomarkers. We investigated the association of blood miRNA levels and a) fatty liver (FL), b) lipoprotein and lipid pathways involved in liver lipid accumulation and c) levels of predicted mRNA targets in general population based cohort. Blood microRNA profiling (TaqMan OpenArray), genome-wide gene expression arrays and nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomics were performed for Young Finns Study participants aged 34-49 years (n?=?871). Liver fat status was assessed ultrasonographically. Levels of hsa-miR-122-5p and -885-5p were up-regulated in individuals with FL (fold change (FC)?=?1.55, p?=?1.36?*?10-14 and FC?=?1.25, p?=?4.86?*?10-4, respectively). In regression model adjusted with age, sex and BMI, hsa-miR-122-5p and -885-5p predicted FL (OR?=?2.07, p?=?1.29?*?10-8 and OR?=?1.41, p?=?0.002, respectively). Together hsa-miR-122-5p and -885-5p slightly improved the detection of FL beyond established risk factors. These miRNAs may be associated with FL formation through the regulation of lipoprotein metabolism as hsa-miR-122-5p levels associated with small VLDL, IDL, and large LDL lipoprotein subclass components, while hsa-miR-885-5p levels associated inversely with XL HDL cholesterol levels. Hsa-miR-885-5p levels correlated inversely with oxysterol-binding protein 2 (OSBPL2) expression (r?=?-0.143, p?=?1.00?*?10-4) and suppressing the expression of this lipid receptor and sterol transporter could link hsa-miR-885-5p with HDL cholesterol levels.
Notes
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2010 Sep 30;363(14 ):1341-50 PMID 20879883
Cites: Nat Cell Biol. 2011 Apr;13(4):423-33 PMID 21423178
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2008 Dec;37(6):1220-6 PMID 18263651
Cites: Ann Med. 2015 Feb;47(1):40-6 PMID 25333756
Cites: PLoS One. 2013;8(3):e58895 PMID 23516571
Cites: PLoS One. 2012;7(9):e45352 PMID 23028956
Cites: J Lipid Res. 2002 Feb;43(2):245-55 PMID 11861666
Cites: Circ Cardiovasc Genet. 2015 Feb;8(1):192-206 PMID 25691689
Cites: PLoS One. 2011 Jan 24;6(1):e16081 PMID 21283674
Cites: J Clin Invest. 2012 Aug;122(8):2871-83 PMID 22820288
Cites: Mol Syst Biol. 2010 Dec 21;6:441 PMID 21179014
Cites: Clin Toxicol (Phila). 2016;54(1):53-5 PMID 26574140
Cites: Clin Chim Acta. 2013 Sep 23;424:99-103 PMID 23727030
Cites: Nat Cell Biol. 2007 Jun;9(6):654-9 PMID 17486113
Cites: PLoS One. 2014 Aug 20;9(8):e105192 PMID 25141008
Cites: PLoS One. 2011;6(8):e23937 PMID 21886843
Cites: Analyst. 2009 Sep;134(9):1781-5 PMID 19684899
Cites: Nature. 2008 Apr 17;452(7189):896-9 PMID 18368051
Cites: Sci Rep. 2015 Oct 22;5:15501 PMID 26489516
Cites: Int J Mol Med. 2013 Mar;31(3):547-54 PMID 23337955
Cites: Nucleic Acids Res. 2008 Mar;36(4):1153-62 PMID 18158304
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2013 May 2;368(18):1685-94 PMID 23534542
Cites: RNA Biol. 2004 Jul;1(2):106-13 PMID 17179747
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2002 Apr 18;346(16):1221-31 PMID 11961152
Cites: Mol Cell Endocrinol. 2014 Jun 25;391(1-2):41-9 PMID 24784704
Cites: Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2012 Mar;32(3):815-21 PMID 22223734
Cites: BMC Gastroenterol. 2006 Nov 02;6:33 PMID 17081293
Cites: J Clin Invest. 2012 Aug;122(8):2884-97 PMID 22820290
Cites: Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2013 Feb;33(2):178-85 PMID 23325474
Cites: Nucleic Acids Res. 2010 Nov;38(20):7248-59 PMID 20615901
Cites: Hepatology. 2012 Nov;56(5):1946-57 PMID 22684891
Cites: J Lipid Res. 2009 Jul;50(7):1305-15 PMID 19224871
Cites: BMC Genomics. 2014 Jun 14;15:474 PMID 24928098
Cites: J Biol Chem. 2010 Jun 4;285(23):17442-52 PMID 20353945
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2013 Jan;37 Suppl 1:E59-69 PMID 22823254
Cites: FASEB J. 2013 Apr;27(4):1404-12 PMID 23271051
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1986 Jan 4;292(6512):13-5 PMID 3080046
Cites: Nat Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2013 Sep;10(9):542-52 PMID 23689081
Cites: Hepatology. 2003 May;37(5):1202-19 PMID 12717402
Cites: J Cell Mol Med. 2014 Feb;18(2):197-207 PMID 24400890
Cites: Oncogene. 2006 Apr 20;25(17):2537-45 PMID 16331254
Cites: J Psychiatr Res. 2015 Dec;71:120-5 PMID 26473696
Cites: Recent Pat Cardiovasc Drug Discov. 2009 Jun;4(2):109-18 PMID 19519553
Cites: Hepatology. 2008 Dec;48(6):1810-20 PMID 19030170
Cites: Nat Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2011 Aug 09;8(9):491-501 PMID 21826088
Cites: Nucleic Acids Res. 2013 Jan;41(Database issue):D252-7 PMID 23193297
Cites: Gut. 2015 May;64(5):800-12 PMID 24973316
Cites: World J Hepatol. 2014 Aug 27;6(8):613-20 PMID 25232454
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2009 Dec;17 (12 ):2239-44 PMID 19461588
Cites: PLoS One. 2012;7(10):e48366 PMID 23152743
Cites: J Infect. 2015 Mar;70(3):273-87 PMID 25452043
Cites: Cell Metab. 2006 Feb;3(2):87-98 PMID 16459310
Cites: Eur J Cancer. 2013 Nov;49(16):3442-9 PMID 23810247
Cites: Cell. 2009 Jan 23;136(2):215-33 PMID 19167326
Cites: Biomed Res Int. 2014;2014:741465 PMID 24745023
Cites: Exp Mol Med. 2015 Sep 18;47:e184 PMID 26380927
Cites: Clin Sci (Lond). 2011 Mar;120(5):183-93 PMID 20815808
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2010 May 10;10:237 PMID 20459722
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2015 Oct 14;36(39):2635-42 PMID 26049157
Cites: Liver Int. 2013 Sep;33(8):1257-65 PMID 23682678
Cites: J Hepatol. 2015 Apr;62(1 Suppl):S47-64 PMID 25920090
PubMed ID
27917915 View in PubMed
Less detail

Characterization of natural bactericidal antibody against Haemophilus influenzae type a in Canadian First Nations: A Canadian Immunization Research Network (CIRN) Clinical Trials Network (CTN) study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297714
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(8):e0201282
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Eli B Nix
Joshua Choi
Christina Anthes
Gabrielle N Gaultier
Joelle Thorgrimson
Andrew D Cox
Raymond S W Tsang
William G McCready
Douglas Boreham
Marina Ulanova
Author Affiliation
Northern Ontario School of Medicine, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(8):e0201282
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood - immunology
Blood Bactericidal Activity - drug effects - immunology
Canada
Female
Haemophilus Infections - blood - immunology - prevention & control
Haemophilus Vaccines - administration & dosage - immunology
Haemophilus influenzae - immunology
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - biosynthesis - immunology
Immunoglobulin M - blood - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
During the last two decades, Haemophilus influenzae serotype a (Hia) emerged as an important cause of invasive disease in Canadian First Nations and Inuit, and Alaskan Native populations, with the highest rates reported in young children. Immunocompetent adults, in contrast to children, do not typically develop invasive Hia disease. To clarify factors responsible for an increased burden of invasive Hia disease in certain population groups we studied serum bactericidal activity (SBA) against Hia and quantified IgG and IgM specific to Hia capsular polysaccharide in healthy adult members of two First Nations communities: 1) with reported cases of invasive Hia disease (Northern Ontario, NO), and 2) without reported cases (Southern Ontario, SO), in comparison to non-First Nations living in proximity to the NO First Nations community, and non-First Nations elderly non-frail Canadians from across the country (total of 110 First Nations and 76 non-First Nations). To elucidate the specificity of bactericidal antibodies, sera were absorbed with various Hia antigens. Naturally acquired SBA against Hia was detected at higher rates in First Nations (NO, 80%; SO, 96%) than non-First Nations elderly Canadians (64%); the SBA titres in First Nations were higher than in non-First Nations elderly Canadians (P0.05). Among First Nations, SBA was mediated predominantly by IgM, and by both antibodies specific to Hia capsular polysaccharide and lipooligosaccharide.
The SBA against Hia is frequently present in sera of First Nations adults regardless of the burden of Hia disease observed in their community; it may represent part of the natural antibody repertoire, which is potentially formed in this population under the influence of certain epigenetic factors. Although the nature of these antibodies deserves further studies to understand their origin, the data suggest that they may represent important protective mechanism against invasive Hia disease.
PubMed ID
30110339 View in PubMed
Less detail

Chronotype and response to training during the polar night: a pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291186
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1320919
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2017
Author
Jacopo Antonino Vitale
Eva Bjoerkesett
Andrea Campana
Giacomo Panizza
Andi Weydahl
Author Affiliation
a Laboratory of Structures Mechanics , IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Galeazzi , Milan , Italy.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1320919
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Biological Clocks - physiology
Exercise - physiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle Strength - physiology
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Norway
Oxygen Consumption - physiology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Pilot Projects
Postural Balance - physiology
Time Factors
Abstract
An individual's chronotype influences his or her physiological rhythms. Some studies have looked at the effect of time of day on the responses to exercise, but studies on the effect of long-term training are lacking.
To report the effects of an 8-week training period during the polar night in non-athletes of different chronotypes living at 70°N.
In all, 10 morning (M), 10 neither (N) and 10 evening (E) types were recruited, and their aerobic capacity (VO2max), strength, flexibility and balance before and after the training period were tested.
3 E-types, 5 N-types and 6 M-types completed the protocol. An increase in VO2max and strength was observed for the whole group. The best negative correlation (r=-0.5287) was found between the Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire (MEQ) score and the increase in VO2max, and the best positive correlation (r=0.4395) was found between MEQ and the increase in strength. Changes in balance and flexibility did not show any clear trends.
In an environment with no outdoor daylight, it seems that the response to 8 weeks of aerobic training is larger in the E- than in the M-types, although the M-types showed a larger improvement in strength.
Notes
Cites: Chronobiol Int. 2006;23(1-2):497-509 PMID 16687322
Cites: Int J Chronobiol. 1976;4(2):97-110 PMID 1027738
Cites: J Biol Rhythms. 2004 Feb;19(1):76-86 PMID 14964706
Cites: Chronobiol Int. 2015 Apr;32(3):405-15 PMID 25469597
Cites: Chronobiol Int. 2013 Jun;30(5):682-90 PMID 23688114
Cites: Ann Behav Med. 2016 Oct;50(5):715-726 PMID 27056396
Cites: Chronobiol Int. 2004 May;21(3):435-43 PMID 15332448
Cites: J Behav Med. 1993 Feb;16(1):103-13 PMID 8433355
Cites: J Sleep Res. 2000 Jun;9(2):117-27 PMID 10849238
Cites: Percept Mot Skills. 2015 Dec;121(3):840-55 PMID 26682609
Cites: Chronobiol Int. 2017;34(2):260-268 PMID 27906554
Cites: Chronobiol Int. 2008 Nov;25(6):1029-46 PMID 19005903
Cites: J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 2011 Sep;51(3):444-51 PMID 21904283
Cites: J Sleep Res. 2002 Sep;11(3):191-9 PMID 12220314
Cites: Chronobiol Int. 2014 May;31(4):479-86 PMID 24467306
Cites: Chronobiol Int. 2012 Nov;29(9):1153-75 PMID 23004349
Cites: Eur J Appl Physiol. 2015 Jun;115(6):1339-49 PMID 25631930
Cites: Chronobiol Int. 2017;34(4):471-479 PMID 28306393
Cites: Percept Mot Skills. 2013 Jun;116(3):1020-8 PMID 24175469
Cites: Chronobiol Int. 2017;34(5):551-562 PMID 28276851
Cites: Chronobiol Int. 2007;24(6):1249-54 PMID 18075811
Cites: Curr Biol. 2015 Feb 16;25(4):518-22 PMID 25639241
Cites: Chronobiol Int. 2005;22(1):21-44 PMID 15865319
PubMed ID
28523961 View in PubMed
Less detail

Clinical outcome after surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis in patients with insignificant lower extremity pain. A prospective cohort study from the Norwegian registry for spine surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299710
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2019 Jan 22; 20(1):36
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
Jan-22-2019
Author
Erland Hermansen
Tor Åge Myklebust
Ivar Magne Austevoll
Frode Rekeland
Tore Solberg
Kjersti Storheim
Oliver Grundnes
Jørn Aaen
Jens Ivar Brox
Christian Hellum
Kari Indrekvam
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Ålesund Hospital, Møre and Romsdal Hospital Trust, Ålesund, Norway. erland.hermansen@helse-bergen.no.
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2019 Jan 22; 20(1):36
Date
Jan-22-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Decompression, Surgical - methods - trends
Female
Humans
Lower Extremity
Lumbar Vertebrae - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Pain Measurement - methods - trends
Prospective Studies
Registries
Spinal Stenosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - surgery
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Spinal stenosis is a clinical diagnosis in which the main symptom is pain radiating to the lower extremities, or neurogenic claudication. Radiological spinal stenosis is commonly observed in the population and it is debated whether patients with no lower extremity pain should be labelled as having spinal stenosis. However, these patients is found in the Norwegian Registry for Spine Surgery, the main object of the present study was to compare the clinical outcomes after decompressive surgery in patients with insignificant lower extremity pain, with those with more severe pain.
This study is based on data from the Norwegian Registry for Spine Surgery (NORspine). Patients who had decompressive surgery in the period from 7/1-2007 to 11/3-2013 at 31 hospitals were included. The patients was divided into four groups based on preoperative Numeric Rating Scale (NRS)-score for lower extremity pain. Patients in group 1 had insignificant pain, group 2 had mild or moderate pain, group 3 severe pain and group 4 extremely severe pain. The primary outcome was change in the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Successfully treated patients were defined as patients reporting at least 30% reduction of baseline ODI, and the number of successfully treated patients in each group were recorded.
In total, 3181 patients were eligible; 154 patients in group 1; 753 in group 2; 1766 in group 3; and 528 in group 4. Group 1 had significantly less improvement from baseline in all the clinical scores 12?months after surgery compared to the other groups. However, with a mean reduction of 8 ODI points and 56% of patients showing a reduction of at least 30% in their ODI score, the proportion of patients defined as successfully treated in group 1, was not significantly different from that of other groups.
This national register study shows that patients with insignificant lower extremity pain had less improvement in primary and secondary outcome parameters from baseline to follow-up compared to patients with more severe lower extremity pain.
PubMed ID
30669998 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Decomposition of Shared Environmental Influences on Externalizing Syndromes in the Swedish Population: A Multivariate Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289628
Source
Twin Res Hum Genet. 2017 08; 20(4):298-309
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-2017
Author
Henrik Ohlsson
Kenneth S Kendler
Paul Lichtenstein
Jan Sundquist
Kristina Sundquist
Author Affiliation
Center for Primary Health Care Research,Lund University,Malmö,Sweden.
Source
Twin Res Hum Genet. 2017 08; 20(4):298-309
Date
08-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - genetics
Criminal Behavior
Environment
Family
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Genetic
Registries
Substance-Related Disorders - genetics
Sweden
Syndrome
Abstract
Using information from Swedish population registries, we attempt to decompose the shared environment (C) into four subcomponents: close family, family, household, and community. Among pairs differing in their genetic and geographical/household relationships, we examine three externalizing syndromes: drug abuse (DA), criminal behavior (CB), and alcohol use disorders (AUD). The best-fitting common pathway model suggested that total estimates for C were higher for DA (21% for males and 18% for females) than for AUD (16% and 14%) and CB (17% and 10%). Concerning syndrome-specific influences in males, close family effects were stronger for CB and AUD, while community effects were stronger for DA. The two C components in between community experiences and close family experiences (family and household) were estimated to almost entirely derive from the common latent factor. In females, among the four components of C, the community experiences were just slightly above zero, while the C components referred to as the household effect were almost zero. The total close family experiences were similar and most important across syndromes were also divided into common and specific components. For all syndromes, for both males and females, the effects of additive genetic factors were 2-4 times the size of the total effect of the shared environment. Applying standard methods to novel relationships, we expand our understanding of how the shared environment contributes to individual differences in three externalizing syndromes.
Notes
Cites: Psychol Med. 2015 Aug;45(11):2253-62 PMID 25936380
Cites: Psychol Bull. 2009 Jul;135(4):608-37 PMID 19586164
Cites: Behav Genet. 2016 Mar;46(2):183-92 PMID 26494460
Cites: Psychol Med. 2015 Apr;45(5):1061-72 PMID 25171596
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2014 Feb;171(2):209-17 PMID 24077613
Cites: Psychol Med. 2014 Jul;44(9):1913-25 PMID 24180693
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2015 Aug;50(8):1277-84 PMID 25708193
Cites: Nat Genet. 2012 Feb 19;44(3):247-50 PMID 22344220
Cites: Psychol Med. 2014 Nov;44(15):3181-7 PMID 24766797
Cites: Psychol Med. 2015 Oct;45(13):2897-907 PMID 26040779
Cites: J Abnorm Psychol. 1992 Feb;101(1):3-17 PMID 1537970
Cites: J Adolesc. 2012 Aug;35(4):823-31 PMID 22240325
Cites: J Subst Abuse. 2001;13(4):391-424 PMID 11775073
Cites: Psychol Sci. 2003 May;14(3):273-7 PMID 12741753
Cites: J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2014 Apr;55(4):304-12 PMID 24261560
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2003 Apr;160(4):687-95 PMID 12668357
Cites: Psychometrika. 2016 Jun;81(2):535-49 PMID 25622929
Cites: Behav Genet. 2002 May;32(3):221-7 PMID 12141783
Cites: Psychol Bull. 2002 May;128(3):490-529 PMID 12002699
Cites: JAMA Psychiatry. 2015 Mar;72(3):211-8 PMID 25565339
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2012 Jul;69(7):690-7 PMID 22393206
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2013 Nov;48(11):1841-9 PMID 23344783
Cites: Psychol Med. 2000 Mar;30(2):281-94 PMID 10824649
Cites: JAMA Psychiatry. 2013 Feb;70(2):235-42 PMID 23229904
Cites: Psychol Med. 2016 Jun;46(8):1639-50 PMID 26996079
Cites: Nature. 2014 Feb 13;506(7487):185-90 PMID 24463508
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1997 Feb;54(2):178-84 PMID 9040286
Cites: Nature. 2009 Aug 6;460(7256):748-52 PMID 19571811
Cites: Behav Genet. 1994 Jan;24(1):35-49 PMID 8192619
PubMed ID
28578747 View in PubMed
Less detail

38 records – page 1 of 4.