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237 records – page 1 of 24.

[10 years of the ischemic heart disease prevention project in northern Karelia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239026
Source
Cas Lek Cesk. 1985 Mar 29;124(13):385-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-29-1985

10-year trends in physical activity in the eastern Finnish adult population: relationship to socioeconomic and lifestyle characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233930
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1988;224(3):195-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
B. Marti
J T Salonen
J. Tuomilehto
P. Puska
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1988;224(3):195-203
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Female
Finland
Health Surveys
Humans
Leisure Activities
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Exertion
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
In a large, community-based cardiovascular disease prevention study in Eastern Finland, independent random population samples were surveyed in 1972, 1977 and 1982. The leisure-time physical activity (LTPA), occupational physical activity (OPA), and socioeconomic and lifestyle characteristics were assessed. In men and women aged 30-59, the proportion with high LTPA increased from 1972 to 1982 by approximately one half (p less than 0.001), whereas that of high OPA decreased during the same period (p less than 0.001). In both sexes, high overall physical activity fell from 1972 to 1977 (p less than 0.001), but no more from 1977 to 1982. The proportion of entirely sedentary remained stable. Education, income and younger age showed a positive, body mass index, smoking and OPA a graded, negative association with high LTPA in 1972 and 1982. Significant (p less than 0.001) differences in 10-year trends of changes in LTPA were observed: men and women with low education or income increased LTPA more than those with high education and income. Socioeconomic factors, such as income and education, appear to have lost importance as determinants of population-wide exercise, whereas the clustering of low physical activity with overweight and smoking has increased.
PubMed ID
3239447 View in PubMed
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[20-year experience with the North Karelia Project. Preventive activities yield results].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219246
Source
Nord Med. 1994;109(2):54-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
P. Puska
E. Vartiainen
J. Tuomilehto
A. Nissinen
Author Affiliation
Avd för epidemiologi och hälsofrämjande, Folkhälsoinstitutet, Helsingfors.
Source
Nord Med. 1994;109(2):54-5
Date
1994
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - prevention & control
Finland - epidemiology
Health education
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality - prevention & control
PubMed ID
8121789 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of self-reported body weight compared to measured body weight. A population survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235826
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1987;15(3):191-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
L. Jalkanen
J. Tuomilehto
A. Tanskanen
P. Puska
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1987;15(3):191-8
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Awareness
Blood pressure
Body Weight
Diet, Reducing - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Truth Disclosure
Abstract
In 1977, in the evaluation of the prevention programme for cardiovascular diseases, 11,880 persons in Eastern Finland were asked to report their own weight on a questionnaire. Each participant was weighted during the following clinical examination. The data of the self-reported body weight were analysed according to sex, age, measured weight and body-mass index (BMI). The results showed that older people underestimated their weight to a greater extent than did younger people of both sexes. The error between measured and self-reported weight was greater in heavier subjects than in thinner individuals. In both sexes weight estimate error (measured weight minus self-reported weight) correlated more strongly with high BMI than with measured weight. Associations between weight estimate error and other variables were studied using a multiple regression model. Men whose annual family income was low were more likely to underestimate their weight than the men with a high annual income. In general, women reported their weight more correctly than men did. Older women were more likely to report their weight less than younger women, whereas women who visited their doctor frequently or who had higher annual family incomes were more aware of their actual body weight than those who had few doctor's consultations or whose family income was low. In men 5.2% and in women 8.3% of the variation in the weight estimate error was explained by the regression model.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
3616534 View in PubMed
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Advances in the management of hypertension in the community over four years of intervention of the North Karelia project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247221
Source
Public Health. 1979 May;93(3):143-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1979

Age and regional differences in reliability and factor structure of the Zung Self-rating Scale in elderly Finnish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235247
Source
J Clin Psychol. 1987 May;43(3):318-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1987
Author
S L Kivelä
A. Nissinen
S. Punsar
P. Puska
Source
J Clin Psychol. 1987 May;43(3):318-27
Date
May-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - psychology
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Psychological Tests
Psychometrics
Abstract
Regional and age differences in the reliability and factor structure of the SDS among elderly (65-84 years) men who were living either in eastern or in southwestern Finland were investigated. The Cronbach alpha coefficient was .803 for the eastern and .809 for the southwestern cohort; these figures were reasonably high. The tendency found was for the coefficient to be somewhat higher for the old (75-84 years) than for the young-old (65-74 years) population. In investigating the factor structure, a principal components factor analysis was performed, and the remaining factors were rotated using the orthogonal Varimax rotation algorithm. Three factors emerged for young-old men in the East, for young-old men in the Southwest and for old men in the Southwest, and four factors for old men in the East. The factor patterns of the first two factors showed similarities in both regions, but their order was different. "Loss of self-esteem" accounted for more of the common variance in the East and "agitated mood" in the Southwest. The differences in the third factor between the two regions were evident.
PubMed ID
3597787 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption and mortality in aging or aged Finnish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12366
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 1989;42(1):61-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
S L Kivelä
A. Nissinen
A. Ketola
S. Punsar
P. Puska
M. Karvonen
Author Affiliation
University of Oulu, Department of Public Health, Finland.
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 1989;42(1):61-8
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aging - physiology
Alcohol Drinking
Cause of Death
Coronary Disease - epidemiology
Finland
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Population Surveillance
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking
Abstract
The association between alcohol consumption and 10-year mortality by death cause was studied in 1112 men aged 55-74 years and living either in eastern or south-western Finland. After adjustment for age, blood pressure, smoking, serum cholesterol, and other variables, the relative odds ratio of 10-year total mortality associated with consuming 1-273 g of absolute alcohol per month was 0.9 (95% confidence interval of 0.6-1.2) and with consuming more than 273 g per month due to violence was small, 15, but relative odds of violent death associated with consuming 1-273 and 274 or more grams of alcohol per month were 3.4 and 16.2, respectively (95% confidence intervals of 0.4-31.9 and 1.9-141.2).
Notes
Erratum In: J Clin Epidemiol 1989;42(7):701
PubMed ID
2913188 View in PubMed
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Angiotensin-converting enzyme genotypes in the high- and low-risk area for coronary heart disease in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216275
Source
Genet Epidemiol. 1995;12(4):391-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
M. Perola
A. Sajantila
C. Sarti
J. Stengård
M. Tamminen
P. Puska
J. Huttunen
J. Tuomilehto
L. Peltonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Molecular Genetics, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Genet Epidemiol. 1995;12(4):391-9
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Coronary Disease - enzymology - genetics
Female
Finland
Genotype
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - enzymology - genetics
Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
The deletion/deletion genotype of the insertion (I)/deletion (D) polymorphism of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene has been suggested to be a risk factor for myocardial infarction (MI). The objective of this study was to evaluate whether genotype distributions of the I/D polymorphism of the ACE gene are different between individuals from high-risk and low-risk areas for coronary heart disease in the genetically isolated population of Finland and to assess the impact of this genetic risk factor by comparing individuals with different parental histories of MI. Representative population-based samples of middle-aged men (n = 363) and women (n = 358) from two areas of Finland were used. The area had a borderline significant effect on the prevalence of the genotype DD (beta = 0.35, SE = 0.16, X2 = 470, df = 1, P = 0.03), the DD genotype being more prevalent in eastern Finland (the high-risk area). The II genotype was more prevalent in women with parental history of MI, so we could not replicate the previous findings of the risk-increasing effect of DD genotype in this sample. Although the observed difference in the ACE DD genotype between the high-risk and low-risk areas for coronary heart disease might represent one of the genetic factors contributing to the difference in risk of coronary heart disease between eastern and southwestern Finland, the data emphasize the fact that also other risk factors, including other genes, contribute to this difference and the high incidence of MI in Finland.
PubMed ID
8536956 View in PubMed
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Are we really active in the prevention of obesity and type 2 diabetes at the community level?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135505
Source
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2011 May;21(5):380-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
M. Uusitupa
J. Tuomilehto
P. Puska
Author Affiliation
University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition and Research Unit, Kuopio University Hospital, P.O. Box 1627, SF-70211 Kuopio, Finland. matti.uusitupa@uef.fi
Source
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2011 May;21(5):380-9
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Services
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - prevention & control
Epidemics
Finland - epidemiology
Health promotion
Humans
Life Style
Motor Activity
Obesity - epidemiology - prevention & control
Prevalence
Primary Health Care
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Risk factors
Abstract
The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is increasing rapidly worldwide. Much of this increase in type 2 diabetes epidemic is related to the increase in obesity. There is now firm evidence from randomised trials that type 2 diabetes is preventable by lifestyle modification influencing diet, physical activity and obesity. This prevention effect is sustainable for many years after cessation of active intervention. The slow progression in the development and implementation of population-based strategies in the prevention of obesity and its most common and serious co-morbidity, type 2 diabetes, is of great concern. We summarise published implementation programmes and describe briefly the activities carried out in Finland. In the Finnish implementation programme for the prevention of type 2 diabetes (FIN-D2D), it was found that it is possible to prevent type 2 diabetes "in real life" in the primary health-care settings. We point out that innovative strategic guidelines and their proper implementation are needed to prevent the diabetes epidemic. Among the different tools, also taxation and other regulation to promote healthy food selection and good interaction with the media should be considered.
PubMed ID
21470836 View in PubMed
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237 records – page 1 of 24.