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Active commuting from youth to adulthood and as a predictor of physical activity in early midlife: the young Finns study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262254
Source
Prev Med. 2014 Feb;59:5-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Xiaolin Yang
Risto Telama
Mirja Hirvensalo
Tuija Tammelin
Jorma S A Viikari
Olli T Raitakari
Source
Prev Med. 2014 Feb;59:5-11
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Analysis of Variance
Bicycling - physiology - statistics & numerical data
Body mass index
Child
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Self Report
Sex Factors
Social Class
Transportation - methods
Walking - physiology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The aims of the study were to describe the stability of active commuting (AC) behavior (i.e., walking and cycling) over 27years and examine the relationship between AC and physical activity (PA) from youth to early midlife.
The mode and distance of travel were assessed using a self-reported questionnaire at five consecutive measurements between 1980 and 2007, when 2072 individuals were followed up from youth (9-18years) to adulthood (30-45years). PA was also measured using a questionnaire.
The prevalence of AC declined sharply with age, particularly after 12years, while AC distances to work or place of study increased substantially. AC was concurrently and prospectively associated with PA in both men and women. Maintained AC, whether walking or cycling and short or long distances, positively predicted adult PA over time. Compared with persistently passive commuters, persistently active commuters had higher adult PA after adjustment for potential covariates. Increasing AC was independently associated with high adult PA, particularly in young adulthood.
Walking and cycling to school/work should be encouraged, as regular AC is associated with higher levels of PA over 27years of follow-up, and thus, may contribute to a healthy and active lifestyle through the various stages of life-course.
PubMed ID
24201092 View in PubMed
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Adiponectin is related with carotid artery intima-media thickness and brachial flow-mediated dilatation in young adults--the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140840
Source
Ann Med. 2010 Dec;42(8):603-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Liisa A Saarikoski
Risto K Huupponen
Jorma S A Viikari
Jukka Marniemi
Markus Juonala
Mika Kähönen
Olli T Raitakari
Author Affiliation
Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
Source
Ann Med. 2010 Dec;42(8):603-11
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiponectin - blood
Adult
Atherosclerosis - epidemiology - pathology - physiopathology
Biological Markers - blood
Brachial Artery - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Carotid Arteries - pathology - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Elasticity Imaging Techniques
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Regional Blood Flow
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Tunica Intima - pathology - ultrasonography
Young Adult
Abstract
Adiponectin may be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. We investigated the relation of adiponectin on early functional and structural markers of subclinical atherosclerosis in a large population-based cohort of young men and women.
We measured serum adiponectin using radioimmunoassay in 2,147 young adults (ages 24-39 years) participating in the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study. The subjects had ultrasound data on carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), carotid artery elasticity (n = 2,139) and brachial flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) (n = 1,996). In univariate analysis, adiponectin was inversely associated with IMT (r = -0.16, P
PubMed ID
20839916 View in PubMed
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ADMA concentration changes across the menstrual cycle and during oral contraceptive use: the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147193
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2010 Feb;162(2):259-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Pirjo Valtonen
Kari Punnonen
Heli Saarelainen
Nonna Heiskanen
Olli T Raitakari
Markus Juonala
Jorma S A Viikari
Georg Alfthan
Mika Kähönen
Reijo Laaksonen
Tiina Lyyra-Laitinen
Tomi Laitinen
Seppo Heinonen
Author Affiliation
Departments of Clinical Chemistry Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Kuopio University Hospital and University of Kuopio, FIN-70210 Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2010 Feb;162(2):259-65
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arginine - analogs & derivatives - blood
Atherosclerosis - epidemiology - metabolism
Brachial Artery - physiology
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Contraceptives, Oral - therapeutic use
Creatinine - blood
Estrogens - therapeutic use
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Menstrual Cycle - metabolism
Progesterone Congeners - therapeutic use
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Vasodilation - physiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) levels during different menstrual cycle phases in young adult women with or without oral contraceptive (OC) use.
The subjects (n=1079) originated from a large population-based, prospective cohort study conducted in Finland. Plasma ADMA, symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA), L-arginine, C-reactive protein, creatinine, and brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) were measured. The use of OCs and menstrual cycle phase were determined from a questionnaire.
In non-OC users, ADMA (P=0.017), L-arginine (P=0.002), and ADMA/SDMA ratio (P
PubMed ID
19934267 View in PubMed
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Adolescence risk factors are predictive of coronary artery calcification at middle age: the cardiovascular risk in young Finns study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120679
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2012 Oct 9;60(15):1364-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-9-2012
Author
Olli Hartiala
Costan G Magnussen
Sami Kajander
Juhani Knuuti
Heikki Ukkonen
Antti Saraste
Irina Rinta-Kiikka
Sakari Kainulainen
Mika Kähönen
Nina Hutri-Kähönen
Tomi Laitinen
Terho Lehtimäki
Jorma S A Viikari
Jaakko Hartiala
Markus Juonala
Olli T Raitakari
Author Affiliation
Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, and Turku PET Center, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland. olli.hartiala@utu.fi
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2012 Oct 9;60(15):1364-70
Date
Oct-9-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Calcinosis - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Coronary Artery Disease - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Coronary Vessels - pathology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine the roles of adolescence risk factors in predicting coronary artery calcium (CAC).
Elevated coronary heart disease risk factor levels in adolescence may predict subsequent CAC independently of change in risk factor levels from adolescence to adulthood.
CAC was assessed in 589 subjects 40 to 46 years of age from the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study. Risk factor levels were measured in 1980 (12 to 18 years) and in 2007.
The prevalence of any CAC was 19.2% (27.9% in men and 12.2% in women). Age, levels of systolic blood pressure (BP), total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in adolescence, as well as systolic BP, total cholesterol, diastolic BP, and pack-years of smoking in adulthood were higher among subjects with CAC than those without CAC. Adolescence LDL-C and systolic BP levels predicted CAC in adulthood independently of 27-year changes in these risk factors. The multivariable odds ratios were 1.34 (95% confidence interval: 1.05 to 1.70; p=0.02) and 1.38 (95% confidence interval: 1.08 to 1.77; p=0.01), for 1-SD increase in adolescence LDL-C and systolic BP, respectively. Exposure to both of these risk factors in adolescence (defined as values at or above the age- and sex-specific 75th percentile) substantially increased the risk of CAC (multivariable odds ratio: 3.5 [95% confidence interval: 1.7 to 7.2; p=0.007]) between groups with no versus both risk factors.
Elevated adolescence LDL-C and systolic BP levels are independent predictors of adulthood CAC, indicating that adolescence risk factor levels play an important role in the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease.
Notes
Comment In: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2012 Oct 9;60(15):1371-322981554
PubMed ID
22981553 View in PubMed
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Adolescent cholesterol metabolism predicts coronary risk factors at middle age: the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157567
Source
Transl Res. 2008 May;151(5):260-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Tatu A Miettinen
Helena Gylling
Olli T Raitakari
Maarit Hallikainen
Jorma Viikari
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Internal Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. tatu.a.miettinen@helsinki.fi
Source
Transl Res. 2008 May;151(5):260-6
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - etiology
Child
Cholesterol - blood - metabolism
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Risk factors
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Atherosclerosis develops at an early age. We studied whether cholesterol metabolism in adolescence is related to coronary risk factors later during the adult years. A random population sample of 12-year-old (n=162), 15-year-old (n=158), and 18-year-old (n=148) boys who participated in the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study was studied for major coronary risk factors in 1980 and 2001. These values were related to noncholesterol sterols and their quartiles in 1980 (ie, markers of cholesterol absorption and synthesis). In 1980, serum triglycerides, body mass index (BMI), and systolic blood pressure were lower and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol was higher in high absorbers versus low absorbers. This difference, except HDL cholesterol, was maintained after follow-up (eg, in 2001, systolic blood pressure was 123+/-1 mm Hg in low absorbers vs 119+/-1 mm Hg in high absorbers, P
PubMed ID
18433708 View in PubMed
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Adult dyslipidemia prediction is improved by repeated measurements in childhood and young adulthood. The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268337
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2015 Apr;239(2):350-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Joel Nuotio
Mervi Oikonen
Costan G Magnussen
Jorma S A Viikari
Nina Hutri-Kähönen
Antti Jula
Russell Thomson
Matthew A Sabin
Stephen R Daniels
Olli T Raitakari
Markus Juonala
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2015 Apr;239(2):350-7
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Atherosclerosis - blood - physiopathology
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - physiopathology
Child
Child, Preschool
Dyslipidemias - blood - physiopathology
Female
Finland
Humans
Lipids - blood - chemistry
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Prediction of adult dyslipidemia has been suggested to improve with multiple measurements in childhood or young adulthood, but there is paucity of specific data from longitudinal studies.
The sample comprised 1912 subjects (54% women) from the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study who had fasting lipid and lipoprotein measurements collected at three time-points in childhood/young adulthood and had at least one follow-up in later adulthood. Childhood/young adult dyslipidemia was defined as total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) or triglycerides (TG) in the highest quintile, or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) in the lowest quintile. Adult dyslipidemia was defined according to European cut-points (TC > 5.0 mmol/L, LDL-C >3 mmol/L, Non-HDL-C >3.8 mmol/L, HDL-C  1.7 mmol/L). With the exception of triglycerides, Pearson correlation coefficients for predicting adult levels significantly improved when two lipid or lipoprotein measurements in childhood/young adulthood were compared with one measurement (all P 
PubMed ID
25682034 View in PubMed
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Adulthood EAS-temperament and carotid artery intima-media thickness: the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138600
Source
Psychol Health. 2011 Jan;26(1):61-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Laura Pulkki-Råback
Sampsa Puttonen
Marko Elovainio
Olli T Raitakari
Markus Juonala
Liisa Keltikangas-Jarvinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Helsinki, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland. laura.pulkki-raback@helsinki.fi
Source
Psychol Health. 2011 Jan;26(1):61-75
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Atherosclerosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - psychology
Carotid Arteries - anatomy & histology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Risk assessment
Temperament - physiology
Tunica Intima - anatomy & histology
Young Adult
Abstract
We examined the association between adulthood emotionality-activity-sociability temperament scale and preclinical atherosclerosis and, whether this association is mediated by cardiovascular risk factors (low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and body-mass index (BMI)). The participants were a nationally representative sample of 537 men and 811 women from the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns study aged 15-30 years at the baseline in 1992 and aged 24-39 years at the follow-up in 2001. Carotid atherosclerosis was assessed by ultrasound scans of the common carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) and brachial flow-mediated dilation (FMD). In men, there was an association between the temperament dimension activity and IMT (ß = 0.08, p = 0.036) which was partially mediated by BMI (ß decreased from 0.08 to 0.05; p-value of Sobel test = 0.002). However, after correction for multiple comparisons the association between IMT and the temperament dimension activity in men was only of borderline significance. In women, there were no associations between temperament and IMT or FMD. These results suggest that a highly active temperament may contribute to early signs of atherosclerosis in men and that body mass may mediate this association.
PubMed ID
21161826 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption is directly associated with carotid intima-media thickness in Finnish young adults: the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153337
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2009 Jun;204(2):e93-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Markus Juonala
Jorma S A Viikari
Mika Kähönen
Tomi Laitinen
Leena Taittonen
Britt-Marie Loo
Antti Jula
Jukka Marniemi
Leena Räsänen
Tapani Rönnemaa
Olli T Raitakari
Author Affiliation
University of Turku, Department of Medicine, Finland. markus.juonala@utu.fi
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2009 Jun;204(2):e93-8
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Carotid Arteries - ultrasonography
Carotid Artery Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - ultrasonography
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Tunica Intima - ultrasonography
Tunica Media - ultrasonography
Young Adult
Abstract
There is substantial epidemiological data suggesting a J- or U-shaped association between alcohol consumption and coronary events. However, some studies in experimental animals suggest that alcohol may increase atherosclerosis. Therefore, our aim was to study whether alcohol consumption is associated with carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), marker of subclinical atherosclerosis, in young, healthy adults.
Alcohol consumption, carotid IMT and conventional cardiovascular risk factors were investigated in 2074 subjects, aged 24-39 years.
In subjects consuming none, >0 to or=4 units of alcohol per day, the respective carotid IMT values were 0.57+/-0.004, 0.59+/-0.003, 0.59+/-0.006, and 0.60+/-0.012 mm (mean+/-S.E.M., P
PubMed ID
19124122 View in PubMed
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Anger is associated with subclinical atherosclerosis in low SES but not in higher SES men and women. The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160793
Source
J Behav Med. 2008 Feb;31(1):35-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Päivi Merjonen
Laura Pulkki-Råback
Sampsa Puttonen
Pertti Keskivaara
Markus Juonala
Risto Telama
Jorma Viikari
Olli T Raitakari
Liisa Keltikangas-Järvinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 9, 00014, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Behav Med. 2008 Feb;31(1):35-44
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Anger
Atherosclerosis - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Carotid Arteries - ultrasonography
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Hostility
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Psychological Tests
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
We investigated the associations of anger and cynicism with carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) and whether these associations were moderated by childhood or adulthood socioeconomic status (SES). The participants were 647 men and 893 women derived from the population-based Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study. Childhood SES was measured in 1980 when the participants were aged 3-18. In 2001, adulthood SES, anger, cynicism, and IMT were measured. There were no associations between anger or cynicism and IMT in the entire population, but anger was associated with thicker IMT in participants who had experienced low SES in childhood. This association persisted after adjustment for a host of cardiovascular risk factors. It is concluded that the ill health-effects of psychological factors such as anger may be more pronounced in individuals who have been exposed to adverse socioeconomic circumstances early in life.
PubMed ID
17940862 View in PubMed
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Aortic sinus diameter in middle age is associated with body size in young adulthood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297426
Source
Heart. 2018 05; 104(9):773-778
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
05-2018
Author
Jussi A Hernesniemi
Jarkko Heiskanen
Saku Ruohonen
Noora Kartiosuo
Nina Hutri-Kähönen
Mika Kähönen
Eero Jokinen
Päivi Tossavainen
Merja Kallio
Tomi Laitinen
Terho Lehtimäki
Jorma S A Viikari
Markus Juonala
Olli T Raitakari
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Tays Heart Hospital, Tampere University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
Source
Heart. 2018 05; 104(9):773-778
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body Size - physiology
Body surface area
Child
Child, Preschool
Echocardiography
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Sinus of Valsalva - anatomy & histology
Young Adult
Abstract
Aortic sinus dilatation can lead to aortic valve regurgitation or even aortic dissection. Our objective was to examine the association between body surface area (BSA) measures from childhood to middle age and aortic sinus diameter in middle age. Understanding the relation of these two clarifies how aortic size is normally determined.
Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study is a longitudinal study with follow-up of over 31 years (1980-2011). The study comprises information of body composition from multiple time points of 1950 subjects with cardiac ultrasound measurements made in 2011. The association between BSA in different ages and aortic sinus diameter in middle age was analysed by linear regression modelling adjusted with age, sex and diastolic blood pressure. Missing BSA values were derived for each life year (ages 3-33 years) from subject-specific curves for body weight and height estimated from longitudinal measurements using mixed model regression splines.
BSA estimates in early 20s are most strongly associated with aortic sinus diameter in middle age. Top association was observed at age 23 years with one SD increase in estimated BSA corresponding to 1.04?mm (0.87-1.21?mm) increase in aortic diameter. Increase in body weight beyond early 20s does not associate with aortic sinus diameter, and the association between middle age BSA and aortic size is substantially weaker (0.74?mm increase (0.58-0.89?mm)). These results were confirmed in a subpopulation using only measured data.
The association between aortic sinus diameter and BSA is stronger when considering BSA in young adulthood compared with BSA in middle age.
PubMed ID
29092920 View in PubMed
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237 records – page 1 of 24.