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Activated immune-inflammatory pathways are associated with long-standing depressive symptoms: Evidence from gene-set enrichment analyses in the Young Finns Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275217
Source
J Psychiatr Res. 2015 Dec;71:120-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Marko Elovainio
Tuukka Taipale
Ilkka Seppälä
Nina Mononen
Emma Raitoharju
Markus Jokela
Laura Pulkki-Råback
Thomas Illig
Melanie Waldenberger
Christian Hakulinen
Taina Hintsa
Mika Kivimäki
Mika Kähönen
Liisa Keltikangas-Järvinen
Olli Raitakari
Terho Lehtimäki
Source
J Psychiatr Res. 2015 Dec;71:120-5
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - immunology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Gene Expression Profiling
Humans
Male
Prospective Studies
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
We used genome wide expression (GWE) data of circulating blood cells and pathway analysis to investigate the inflammatory and other molecular pathways that may be associated with long-standing depressive symptoms. Participants were 607 women and 316 men (mean age 42 years) from the Young Finns Study who participated in three consecutive study phases in 2001, 2007 and 2012. Using Gene-set enrichment analyses (GSEA) we focused our analyses to pathways (available in MSigDB database) that are likely to affect immunological and inflammatory processes. GSEA were performed for blood cell GWE data in 2012. Depressive symptoms were assessed using a modified 21-item Beck Depression Inventory in each of the three study phases. Participants who scored in the top quartile of depressive symptoms in each of the three measurement points (n = 191) differed from other participants (n = 732) in several gene-set pathways related to inflammatory processes or immune-inflammatory signaling including interleukin (IL-1) pathway, and pathways related to various immuno-inflammatory processes, such as toll-like, the NEF protein, the nuclear factor kB, the kinase AKT and the mature B cell antigen receptor pathway (false discovery rates, FDRs
PubMed ID
26473696 View in PubMed
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Adulthood EAS-temperament and carotid artery intima-media thickness: the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138600
Source
Psychol Health. 2011 Jan;26(1):61-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Laura Pulkki-Råback
Sampsa Puttonen
Marko Elovainio
Olli T Raitakari
Markus Juonala
Liisa Keltikangas-Jarvinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Helsinki, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland. laura.pulkki-raback@helsinki.fi
Source
Psychol Health. 2011 Jan;26(1):61-75
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Atherosclerosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - psychology
Carotid Arteries - anatomy & histology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Risk assessment
Temperament - physiology
Tunica Intima - anatomy & histology
Young Adult
Abstract
We examined the association between adulthood emotionality-activity-sociability temperament scale and preclinical atherosclerosis and, whether this association is mediated by cardiovascular risk factors (low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and body-mass index (BMI)). The participants were a nationally representative sample of 537 men and 811 women from the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns study aged 15-30 years at the baseline in 1992 and aged 24-39 years at the follow-up in 2001. Carotid atherosclerosis was assessed by ultrasound scans of the common carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) and brachial flow-mediated dilation (FMD). In men, there was an association between the temperament dimension activity and IMT (ß = 0.08, p = 0.036) which was partially mediated by BMI (ß decreased from 0.08 to 0.05; p-value of Sobel test = 0.002). However, after correction for multiple comparisons the association between IMT and the temperament dimension activity in men was only of borderline significance. In women, there were no associations between temperament and IMT or FMD. These results suggest that a highly active temperament may contribute to early signs of atherosclerosis in men and that body mass may mediate this association.
PubMed ID
21161826 View in PubMed
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Antidepressant use and mortality in Finland: a register-linkage study from a nationwide cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152280
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2009 Jul;65(7):715-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Jari Haukka
Martti Arffman
Timo Partonen
Sinikka Sihvo
Marko Elovainio
Jari Tiihonen
Jouko Lönnqvist
Ilmo Keskimäki
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. jari.haukka@thl.fi
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2009 Jul;65(7):715-20
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antidepressive Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Data Collection
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Prescriptions
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
It is generally acknowledged that depressed patients need specific attention during the first weeks after initiation of antidepressant (AD) treatment because of the increased risk of suicide.
The study population consisted of all individuals residing in Finland from 1999 to 2003 who had purchased a prescribed antidepressant at least once but had no preceding antidepressant prescription. Data sources were the National Prescription Register, the Causes of Death Register, Census Data of Statistics Finland, and the National Care Register. Follow-up started at the first purchase and ended at the end of 2003 or death. Data on prescriptions were used to construct contiguous treatment periods of follow-up time. Life-table analysis with Poisson regression was used to estimate risk ratios (RR) of antidepressant use with respect to all-cause mortality and to deaths from suicide.
Current AD use was associated with a lowered all-cause mortality (RR = 0.18, 95% CI = 0.18-0.19) compared with those who filled one previous prescription only. There was no difference in suicide mortality when any current antidepressant usage was compared to the one-prescription group. Current SSRI usage was associated with lower risk of suicide compared to the one-prescription or other antidepressant groups (RR 0.47, 0.38-0.59).
Current AD treatment is associated with decreased all-cause mortality rates in patients who have ever had AD treatment.
PubMed ID
19259654 View in PubMed
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Are there high-risk groups among physicians that are more vulnerable to on-call work?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265028
Source
Am J Emerg Med. 2015 May;33(5):614-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Tarja Heponiemi
Anna-Mari Aalto
Laura Pekkarinen
Eeva Siuvatti
Marko Elovainio
Source
Am J Emerg Med. 2015 May;33(5):614-9
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Circadian Rhythm
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Physicians - psychology
Questionnaires
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - psychology
Work Schedule Tolerance - psychology
Workload - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Work done in the emergency departments is one stressful aspect of physicians' work. Numerous previous studies have highlighted the stressfulness of on-call work and especially of night on call. In addition, previous studies suggest that there may be individual differences in adjusting to changes in circadian rhythms and on-call work.
The objective of this study was to examine whether physicians' on-call work is associated with perceived work-related stress factors and job resources and whether there are groups that are more vulnerable to on-call work according to sex, age, and specialization status.
This was a cross-sectional questionnaire study among 3230 Finnish physicians (61.5% women). The analyses were conducted using analyses of covariance adjusted for sex, age, specialization status, and employment sector.
Physicians with on-call duties had more time pressure and stress related to team work and patient information systems compared with those who did not have on-call duties. In addition, they had less job control opportunities and experienced organization as less fair and team climate as worse. Older physicians and specialists seemed to be especially vulnerable to on-call work regarding stress factors, whereas younger and specialist trainees seemed vulnerable to on-call work regarding job resources.
Focusing on team issues and resources is important for younger physicians and trainees having on-call duties, whereas for older and specialists, attention should be focused on actual work load and time pressure.
PubMed ID
25680563 View in PubMed
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The association between cross-cultural competence and well-being among registered native and foreign-born nurses in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300160
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(12):e0208761
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Karolina Wesolowska
Laura Hietapakka
Marko Elovainio
Anna-Mari Aalto
Anu-Marja Kaihlanen
Tarja Heponiemi
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Health Systems Research, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(12):e0208761
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence
Cross-Sectional Studies
Cultural Competency
Culturally Competent Care
Empathy
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Nurses, International - psychology
Nursing Staff - psychology
Sleep Wake Disorders
Stress, Psychological
Transcultural Nursing
Young Adult
Abstract
A growing body of research indicates that cross-cultural competence in nurses can improve migrant patients' health-related outcomes, but little is known about the potential benefits of cross-cultural competence on the nurses' own well-being.
To examine whether cross-cultural competence (empathy, skills, positive attitudes, and motivation) is associated with perceived time pressure at work, psychological distress, and sleep problems among registered nurses in Finland, and whether there are differences in these potential associations between native and foreign-born nurses.
The present cross-sectional study was based on a sample of 212 foreign-born nurses licensed to practice in Finland and a random sample of 744 native Finnish nurses. Data were collected with a questionnaire and analyzed using multiple linear regression and structural equation modeling (SEM).
Of all four dimensions of cross-cultural competence, only empathy was associated with perceived time pressure (ß = -0.13, p = .018), distress (ß = -0.23, p .05).
Cross-cultural empathy may protect against perceived time pressure, distress, and sleep problems in both native and foreign-born nurses. Thus, the promotion of this component of cross-cultural competence among nursing personnel should be encouraged.
PubMed ID
30532137 View in PubMed
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The Association Between Social Support, Body Mass Index and Increased Risk of Prediabetes: the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287044
Source
Int J Behav Med. 2017 Apr;24(2):161-170
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Anna Serlachius
Marko Elovainio
Markus Juonala
Steven Shea
Matthew Sabin
Terho Lehtimäki
Olli Raitakari
Liisa Keltikangas-Järvinen
Laura Pulkki-Råback
Source
Int J Behav Med. 2017 Apr;24(2):161-170
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Prediabetic State - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Social Support
Young Adult
Abstract
The psychosocial determinants of prediabetes are poorly understood. The aims of our study were (1) to analyse the association between perceived social support in young adulthood and fasting glucose levels and prediabetes in mid-adulthood in a cohort of healthy Finns, (2) to explore whether body mass index (BMI), inflammation or depression mediate this relationship, (3) and to examine the association between social support trajectory groups and fasting glucose.
A prospective design was used with an analytic sample of 1250 participants aged 3-18 years at baseline (1980) and aged 12-39 years when social support was measured. Fasting glucose and prediabetes were assessed 32 years after baseline. Linear and logistic regression was used to examine the association between social support and the outcome measures. A bootstrapping technique was used to examine mediation effects.
Social support was associated with future glucose levels in women after adjusting for childhood socioeconomic status (SES) and youth depression (ß = -0.136, p = 0.001) and also predicted prediabetes in women after adjusting for childhood SES (ß = 1.31, 95 % CI 1.02 to 1.69, p = 0.031). Both associations were attenuated after adjusting for BMI in mid-adulthood. BMI was found to mediate the relationship between social support and prediabetes in women (ß for indirect effect ß = 0.09, SE = 0.03, CI = 0.03 to 0.16).
Low perceived social support in young adulthood is associated with high fasting glucose and prediabetes in mid-adulthood in women but not men. The association between social support and prediabetes in women can be partly explained by BMI.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27699627 View in PubMed
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Association between the type 4 dopamine receptor gene polymorphism and novelty seeking.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185241
Source
Psychosom Med. 2003 May-Jun;65(3):471-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Liisa Keltikangas-Järvinen
Marko Elovainio
Mika Kivimäki
Dirk Lichtermann
Jesper Ekelund
Leena Peltonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. liisa.keltikangas-jarvinen@helsinki.fi
Source
Psychosom Med. 2003 May-Jun;65(3):471-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alleles
Educational Status
Exploratory Behavior - physiology
Female
Finland
Genotype
Humans
Impulsive Behavior - genetics
Male
Minisatellite Repeats
Prospective Studies
Receptors, Dopamine D2 - genetics
Receptors, Dopamine D4
Abstract
Mixed results have been reported on the association between the type 4 dopamine receptor gene (DRD4) and the temperament dimension of novelty seeking. We tested this association by specifying the analysis to components of novelty seeking.
Participants were 150 high and low novelty-seeking scorers (the highest and lowest 10%) from a randomized, population-based sample of Finnish citizens in six age cohorts. We genotyped a 48-bp repeat polymorphism in the DRD4 gene. Novelty seeking was assessed by the Temperament and Character Inventory.
No difference in overall novelty seeking between individuals with no seven-repeat allele (short) and any seven-repeat allele (long), between the 4,4 and 4,7 genotype groups, and between long (l/l and s/l) and short (s/s) polymorphism groups were found. The odds ratio for high overall novelty seeking in the presence of any two- or five-repeated alleles vs. none was 2.41 (95% CI, 1.11-5.20). Corresponding odds ratios were significant for exploratory excitability (2.94; 95% CI, 1.32-6.59) and impulsiveness (2.74; 95% CI, 1.23-6.11) but not for other components of novelty seeking. No interactions with age or gender were detected.
The present study confirmed previous findings on the association between the type 4 dopamine receptor gene and novelty seeking, in particular exploratory excitability and impulsiveness. The tendency to avoid or approach a novel situation is a core concept of several temperamental theories. The present findings support the hypothesis that this tendency is associated with DRD4 and might concern temperament psychology in general, not only the concept of novelty seeking.
PubMed ID
12764221 View in PubMed
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Association of age at menarche with cardiovascular risk factors, vascular structure, and function in adulthood: the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156794
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Jun;87(6):1876-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Mika Kivimäki
Debbie A Lawlor
George Davey Smith
Marko Elovainio
Markus Jokela
Liisa Keltikangas-Järvinen
Jussi Vahtera
Leena Taittonen
Markus Juonala
Jorma S A Viikari
Olli T Raitakari
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, United Kingdom. m.kivimaki@ucl.ac.uk
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Jun;87(6):1876-82
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Birth weight
Blood pressure
Body Height
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Child
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Menarche - physiology
Menstruation
Multivariate Analysis
Overweight - complications
Risk factors
Abstract
It is unclear whether age at menarche is an independent determinant of future cardiovascular risk.
We aimed to determine whether menarcheal age is an independent predictor of body mass index (BMI) and a wide range of cardiovascular risk factors in adolescence and adulthood.
We examined the associations of menarcheal age with BMI (in kg/m(2)) and other cardiovascular risk factors in adolescence and adulthood in a population-based sample of 794 female adolescents aged 9-18 y at baseline. Their age at first menstruation was requested at baseline and again 3 and 6 y later. Cardiovascular risk factors were assessed at baseline and at age 30-39 y.
A 1-y decrease in menarcheal age was associated with 0.81 (95% CI: 0.53, 1.08) higher adult BMI as well as greater waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio, elevated systolic blood pressure, higher insulin resistance, and greater risk of metabolic syndrome (P
PubMed ID
18541580 View in PubMed
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Association of contractual and subjective job insecurity with sickness presenteeism among public sector employees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141949
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2010 Aug;52(8):830-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Tarja Heponiemi
Marko Elovainio
Jaana Pentti
Marianna Virtanen
Hugo Westerlund
Pekka Virtanen
Tuula Oksanen
Mika Kivimäki
Jussi Vahtera
Author Affiliation
Service System Research Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. tarja.heponiemi@thl.fi
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2010 Aug;52(8):830-5
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude
Cross-Sectional Studies
Employment
Faculty
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nurses
Occupational Health
Personnel Management - statistics & numerical data
Public Sector - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
We examined the associations of contractual job insecurity (fixed-term vs permanent employment contract) and subjectively assessed job insecurity with sickness presenteeism among those who had no sickness absences during the study year.
Survey data from a sample of 18,454 Public sector employees were gathered in 2004 (the Finnish Public Sector study).
Fixed-term employees were less likely to report working while ill (odds ratio = 0.88, 95% confidence interval = 0.77 to 0.99) than permanent employees. Subjective insecurity was associated with higher levels of working while ill, and this association was stronger among older employees. These results remained after adjustments for demographics, health-related variables, and optimism.
Our results suggest that subjective job insecurity might be even more important than contractual insecurity when a public sector employee makes the decision to go to work despite feeling ill.
PubMed ID
20657303 View in PubMed
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The association of distress and sleeping problems with physicians' intentions to change profession: the moderating effect of job control.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147879
Source
J Occup Health Psychol. 2009 Oct;14(4):365-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Tarja Heponiemi
Anne Kouvonen
Jukka Vänskä
Hannu Halila
Timo Sinervo
Mika Kivimäki
Marko Elovainio
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. tarja.heponiemi@thl.fi
Source
J Occup Health Psychol. 2009 Oct;14(4):365-73
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Career Mobility
Female
Finland
Humans
Intention
Internal-External Control
Male
Middle Aged
Personnel Loyalty
Physicians - psychology
Questionnaires
Sleep Disorders
Stress, Psychological
Abstract
The present study examined whether job control moderated the association between stress indicators (distress and sleeping problems) and intentions to change profession among 2,650 Finnish physicians. Ordinal logistic regression analysis was applied. The authors found that high levels of distress and sleeping problems were associated with higher levels of intentions to change profession, whereas high job control was associated with lower levels of intentions to change profession even after adjusting for the effects of gender, age, and employment sector. In addition, high job control was able to mitigate the positive association that distress and sleeping problems had with intentions to change profession. Our findings highlight the importance of offering more job control to physicians to prevent unnecessary physician turnover.
PubMed ID
19839657 View in PubMed
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172 records – page 1 of 18.