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Abdominal adipose tissue distribution, obesity, and risk of cardiovascular disease and death: 13 year follow up of participants in the study of men born in 1913.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55732
Source
Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1984 May 12;288(6428):1401-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-12-1984
Author
B. Larsson
K. Svärdsudd
L. Welin
L. Wilhelmsen
P. Björntorp
G. Tibblin
Source
Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1984 May 12;288(6428):1401-4
Date
May-12-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen
Adipose Tissue
Aged
Anthropometry
Blood pressure
Body Composition
Cerebrovascular Disorders - epidemiology
Coronary Disease - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Obesity - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Sweden
Abstract
In a prospective study of risk factors for ischaemic heart disease 792 54 year old men selected by year of birth (1913) and residence in Gothenburg agreed to attend for questioning and a battery of anthropometric and other measurements in 1967. Thirteen years later these baseline findings were reviewed in relation to the numbers of men who had subsequently suffered a stroke, ischaemic heart disease, or death from all causes. Neither quintiles nor deciles of initial indices of obesity (body mass index, sum of three skinfold thickness measurements, waist or hip circumference) showed a significant correlation with any of the three end points studied. Statistically significant associations were, however, found between the waist to hip circumference ratio and the occurrence of stroke (p = 0.002) and ischaemic heart disease (p = 0.04). When the confounding effect of body mass index or the sum of three skinfold thicknesses was accounted for the waist to hip circumference ratio was significantly associated with all three end points. This ratio, however, was not an independent long term predictor of these end points when smoking, systolic blood pressure, and serum cholesterol concentration were taken into account. These results indicate that in middle aged men the distribution of fat deposits may be a better predictor of cardiovascular disease and death than the degree of adiposity.
PubMed ID
6426576 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcoholic intemperance, coronary heart disease and mortality in middle-aged Swedish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12630
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1987;222(3):201-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
A. Rosengren
L. Wilhelmsen
K. Pennert
G. Berglund
D. Elmfeldt
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Ostra Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1987;222(3):201-13
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholism - complications - mortality
Coronary Disease - etiology - mortality
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
High alcohol consumption is one of the major risk indicators for premature death in middle-aged men. An indicator of alcohol abuse--registration with the social authorities for alcoholic problems--was used to evaluate the role of alcohol in relation to general and cause-specific mortality in a general population sample. Altogether 1,116 men (11%) out of a total population of 10,004 men were registered for alcoholic problems. Total mortality during 11.8 years' follow-up was 10.4% among the non-registered men, compared to 20.5% among men with occasional convictions for drunkenness and 29.6% among heavy abusers. Fatal cancer as a whole was not independently associated with alcohol abuse, but oropharyngeal and oesophageal cancers together were seven times more common in the alcohol-registered groups. Total coronary heart disease (CHD) was significantly and independently associated with alcohol abuse, but nearly all the excess CHD mortality among the alcohol-registered men could be attributed to sudden coronary death. Cases with definite recent myocardial infarction were not more common in the alcoholic population. A combined effect of coronary arteriosclerosis and heart muscle damage secondary to alcohol abuse is suggested. Other causes of death strongly associated with registration for alcohol abuse include pulmonary embolism, pneumonia and peptic ulcer, as well as death from liver cirrhosis and alcoholism. Of the excess mortality among alcohol-registered subjects, 20.1% could be attributed to CHD, 18.1% to violent death, 13.6% to alcoholism without another diagnosis and 11.1% to liver cirrhosis.
PubMed ID
3425375 View in PubMed
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Alcoholic registration and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality--a prospective study in middle aged Swedish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55591
Source
Acta Med Scand Suppl. 1987;717:87-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
A. Rosengren
L. Wilhelmsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Ostra Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Acta Med Scand Suppl. 1987;717:87-92
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - complications
Death, Sudden - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology
Prospective Studies
Registries
Sweden
Abstract
The consequences of alcoholic intemperance and economic problems on CHD mortality and morbidity were studied among the participants in a large primary preventive trial. Official register data were used. Subjects registered with the Board of Social Welfare were categorised with respect to increasing load of alcoholic intemperance. Non-fatal CHD was not related to alcoholic problems. Fatal CHD, on the other hand, was strongly associated with registration for intemperance. This was especially pronounced for cases dying suddenly from CHD. A multivariate analysis was performed, controlling for smoking, systolic blood pressure and serum cholesterol, which showed that the association between intemperance and fatal CHD was independent of these factors.
PubMed ID
3478974 View in PubMed
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Alphalipoprotein cholesterol levels in relation to acute myocardial infarction and its risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55926
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 1980 May;40(3):239-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1980
Author
O. Wiklund
G. Fager
I H Craig
C E Wilhelmsson
A. Vedin
S O Olofsson
G. Bondjers
L. Wilhelmsen
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 1980 May;40(3):239-47
Date
May-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cholesterol - blood
Comparative Study
Exertion
Humans
Lipoproteins, HDL - blood
Male
Myocardial Infarction - blood - etiology
Random Allocation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Smoking
Sweden
Abstract
During 1975-1977 twenty-nine males surviving acute myocardial infarction at an age between 40-44 years were registered in Gothenburg, Sweden. Twenty-five of these were studied and compared with two control groups. One group, the reference group (RG, n = 76), was randomly selected from the male population from which the acute myocardial infarction (AMI) group was derived. A second group, the matched control group (MC, n = 47), consisted of men with no history of coronary heart disease, matched with patients for age, serum cholesterol and body weight index. Serum triglyceride levels were higher and alphalipoprotein cholesterol lower in the AMI group than in RG. Prior to infarction, patients had a higher degree of physical activity at work and a higher tobacco consumption than RG. When AMI cases were compared with MC subjects lower alphalipoprotein cholesterol levels were found in AMI, and they also had a higher tobacco consumption prior to infarction. There was a negative correlation between alphalipoprotein cholesterol levels and tobacco consumption in the RG. The differences in alphalipoprotein cholesterol levels between AMI cases and controls could not attributed to smoking habits, but smoking may at least to some extent exert its effect as a risk factor through influence on alphalipoprotein cholesterol levels.
PubMed ID
7444341 View in PubMed
Less detail

Angina pectoris and myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56085
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1977;202(5):337-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
1977
Author
C. Wilhelmsson
J A Vedin
D. Elmfeldt
G. Tibblin
L. Wilhelmsen
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1977;202(5):337-40
Date
1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Angina Pectoris - epidemiology - mortality
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - mortality
Prognosis
Recurrence
Sweden
Abstract
Angina pectoris was studied in a representative series of male patients (n = 504) with a first myocardial infarction (MI) surviving the hospital stay. The prevalence of questionnaire angina before MI was 28% and of effort-induced chest pain alone 40%. Of the patients with effort-induced chest pain, 72% retained symptoms also after MI. No correlation with age was found. Three months after and one year after infarction the prevalence of effort-induced chest pain was 55% and 45%, respectively. The patients with effort-induced chest pain before MI had a somewhat more severe clinical course and a significantly higher death rate (15% versus 6%) than those without chest pain.
PubMed ID
920257 View in PubMed
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Angina pectoris, intermittent claudication and congestive heart failure in middle-aged male hypertensives. Development and predictive factors during long-term antihypertensive care. The Primary Preventive Trial, Göteborg, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46729
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1987;221(1):23-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
O. Samuelsson
L. Wilhelmsen
K. Pennert
G. Berglund
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1987;221(1):23-32
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actuarial Analysis
Angina Pectoris - etiology - prevention & control
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Failure, Congestive - etiology - prevention & control
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy
Intermittent Claudication - etiology - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Abstract
A group of middle-aged male hypertensives, derived from a random sample of a Swedish urban population, has been treated and followed for 10 years. The development of angina pectoris, intermittent claudication and congestive heart failure have been analysed. The initial prevalence and the average yearly incidence of angina pectoris was 3.9% and 1.3% p.a., of intermittent claudication 1.7% and 0.6% p.a. and of heart failure 1.0% and 0.8% p.a. ECG signs indicating subclinical heart disease (major Q wave, ST depression, T wave inversion) were risk factors for development of angina pectoris and congestive heart failure. Heart enlargement on chest X-ray was also a risk factor for development of congestive heart failure, as were a high serum creatinine, body mass index, serum uric acid and proteinuria. Smoking was found to be a strong and independent risk factor for any one of these cardiovascular disorders. After 10 years about one fourth of all patients, still attending the clinic, had at least one cardiovascular complication. Hence, the risk of developing cardiovascular disorders is substantial and seems to be potentiated by the same risk factors known to operate in the general population.
PubMed ID
3565082 View in PubMed
Less detail

The applicability of the results of streamlined trials to clinical practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55373
Source
Stat Med. 1990 Jan-Feb;9(1-2):185-91
Publication Type
Article
Author
L. Wilhelmsen
Author Affiliation
Gothenburg University, Department of Medicine, Ostra Hospital, Goteborg, Sweden.
Source
Stat Med. 1990 Jan-Feb;9(1-2):185-91
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ethics, Medical
Humans
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - drug therapy
Physician's Practice Patterns
Randomized Controlled Trials - methods
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Thrombolytic Therapy
Abstract
During recent decades we have seen an encouraging development of trial methodology. Less effort, however, has been devoted to the application of findings of trials to the practice of medicine. We cannot expect results of controlled trials alone to determine standard therapy, for clinical judgements are also required. Both beneficial and adverse effects are often only detectable on the group level. There are generally very few indications that drug effects differ qualitatively in subgroups of patients. It is important not only to prove or disprove effects, but also to find out how to implement a proper therapy for a majority of eligible patients. Four examples from treatment after myocardial infraction show that drug usage may not always be based upon results of clinical trials. The adoption of Swedish guidelines for thrombolytic therapy in acute myocardial infarction is taken as an example of an apparently optimal application of trial results in practice.
PubMed ID
2345834 View in PubMed
Less detail

Application of a disease-specific, quality-of-life measure (QoL-AGHDA) in growth hormone-deficient adults and a random population sample in Sweden: validation of the measure by rasch analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52503
Source
Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2000 Feb;52(2):143-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000
Author
L. Wirén
D. Whalley
S. McKenna
L. Wilhelmsen
Author Affiliation
Research Centre for Endocrinology and Metabolism, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden. lena.wiren@medic.gu.se
Source
Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2000 Feb;52(2):143-52
Date
Feb-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Age of Onset
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Case-Control Studies
Female
Human Growth Hormone - deficiency
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Psychometrics - methods
Quality of Life
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Growth hormone deficiency (GHD) in adults has been associated with impaired health status and quality of life (QoL) in several studies using generic measures, and in a few studies using recently developed disease-specific measures. Theoretically, disease-specific measures may be more sensitive and succinct than generic measures, and hence prove convenient for general use in clinical practice. The present study sought to validate the scaling properties of the disease-specific QoL-AGHDA measure through the implementation of Rasch analysis. The study also sought to compare, by using the QoL-AGHDA, the QoL of a relatively large Swedish cohort of adults with untreated GHD with that of a reference population also from Sweden. PATIENTS: The QoL of 111 adults with untreated GHD from Stockholm and Göteborg was compared with that of 1448 adult subjects randomly selected from the population of Göteborg. MEASUREMENTS: The scaling properties of the QoL-AGHDA were assessed by investigating its fit to a dichotomous Rasch model. Rasch-transformed QoL scores from the QoL-AGHDA questionnaire were stratified by age and gender, and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. RESULTS: Rasch analysis of the QoL-AGHDA indicated the measure to be robust in terms of its unidimensionality and ordering properties, and lack of differential item functioning. The raw scores produced by the QoL-AGHDA are at the ordinal level. Non-overlapping 95% confidence intervals of Rasch-transformed interval scores in most age categories indicated that men and women with GHD had significantly lower QoL than the reference population. CONCLUSION: The Swedish QoL-AGHDA has good scaling properties, and hence can be considered a robust measure. It is suitable for assessing quality of life in adults with GH deficiency, and for making comparisons with adults who are not growth hormone deficient. Adult GH deficiency is associated with a significant impairment in QoL.
Notes
Comment On: Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2000 Feb;52(2):141-210671939
PubMed ID
10671940 View in PubMed
Less detail

Are there socio-economic differences in survival after acute myocardial infarction?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54604
Source
Eur Heart J. 1996 Nov;17(11):1619-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1996

175 records – page 1 of 18.