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Added predictive ability of the CHA2DS2VASc risk score for stroke and death in patients with atrial fibrillation: the prospective Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124928
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes. 2012 May;5(3):335-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Torben Bjerregaard Larsen
Gregory Y H Lip
Flemming Skjøth
Karen Margrete Due
Kim Overvad
Lars Hvilsted Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Aalborg AF Study Group, Cardiovascular Research Centre, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark. tobl@rn.dk
Source
Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes. 2012 May;5(3):335-42
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Aged
Anticoagulants - administration & dosage
Atrial Fibrillation - drug therapy - epidemiology - mortality
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
ROC Curve
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Stroke - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control
Time Factors
Abstract
The objective of this study was to evaluate the added predictive ability of the CHA(2)DS(2)VASc prediction rule for stroke and death in a nonanticoagulated population of patients with atrial fibrillation.
We included 1603 nonanticoagulated patients with incident atrial fibrillation from a Danish prospective cohort study of 57 053 middle-aged men and women. The Net Reclassification Improvement was calculated as a measure to estimate any overall improvement in reclassification with the CHA(2)DS(2)VASc sore as an alternative to the CHADS(2) score. After 1-year follow-up, crude incidence rates were 3.4 per 100 person-years for stroke and 13.6 for death. After a mean follow-up of 5.4 years (± 3.7 years), the crude incidence rates for stroke and death were 1.9 and 5.6, respectively. During the entire observation period, the c-statistics and negative predictive values were similar for both risk scores. The Net Reclassification Improvement analysis showed that 1 of 10 reclassified atrial fibrillation patients would have been upgraded correctly using the CHA(2)DS(2)VASc score.
Both the CHADS(2) as well as the CHA(2)DS(2)VASc risk score can exclude a large proportion of patients from having high risk of stroke or death. However, using the CHA(2)DS(2)VASc risk score, fewer patients will fulfill the criterion for low risk (and are truly low risk for thromboembolism). For every 10 extra patients transferred to the treatment group at 5 years, using the CHA(2)DS(2)VASc risk score, 1 patient would have had a stroke that might have been avoided with effective treatment.
PubMed ID
22534406 View in PubMed
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Adherence to a Healthy Nordic Diet and Risk of Stroke: A Danish Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282576
Source
Stroke. 2017 Feb;48(2):259-264
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Camilla Plambeck Hansen
Kim Overvad
Cecilie Kyrø
Anja Olsen
Anne Tjønneland
Søren Paaske Johnsen
Marianne Uhre Jakobsen
Christina Catherine Dahm
Source
Stroke. 2017 Feb;48(2):259-264
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet, Mediterranean
Female
Fishes
Fruit
Health Promotion - methods
Healthy Diet - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk factors
Scandinavian and Nordic Countries - epidemiology
Stroke - diet therapy - epidemiology - prevention & control
Vegetables
Whole Grains
Abstract
Specific dietary patterns, including the Mediterranean diet, have been associated with stroke prevention. Our aim was to investigate whether adherence to a healthy Nordic diet, including fish, apples and pears, cabbages, root vegetables, rye bread, and oatmeal, was associated with risk of stroke.
Incident cases of stroke among 55?338 men and women from the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort were identified from the Danish National Patient Register and verified by review of records. Cases of ischemic stroke were further subclassified based on etiology according to the TOAST classification system (Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment). Information on diet was collected at baseline (1993-1997) using a semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazards ratios of total stroke and subtypes of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.
During a median follow-up of 13.5 years, 2283 cases of incident stroke were verified, including 1879 ischemic strokes. Adherence to a healthy Nordic diet, as reflected by a higher Healthy Nordic Food Index score, was associated with a lower risk of stroke. The hazards ratio comparing an index score of 4 to 6 (high adherence) with an index score of 0 to 1 (low adherence) was 0.86 (95% confidence interval 0.76-0.98) for total stroke. Inverse associations were observed for ischemic stroke, including large-artery atherosclerosis. No trend was observed for hemorrhagic stroke; however, a statistically insignificant trend was observed for intracerebral hemorrhage.
Our findings suggest that a healthy Nordic diet may be recommended for the prevention of stroke.
PubMed ID
28049735 View in PubMed
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Adherence to a healthy Nordic food index is associated with a lower incidence of colorectal cancer in women: the Diet, Cancer and Health cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121827
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Mar 14;109(5):920-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-14-2013
Author
Cecilie Kyrø
Guri Skeie
Steffen Loft
Kim Overvad
Jane Christensen
Anne Tjønneland
Anja Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Strandboulevarden 49, 2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Mar 14;109(5):920-7
Date
Mar-14-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Avena sativa
Brassica
Bread
Cohort Studies
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diet
Female
Fishes
Fruit
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Malus
Middle Aged
Norway
Pyrus
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Secale cereale
Vegetables
Abstract
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a multi-factorial disease in which diet is believed to play a role. Little is known about the health effects of specific regional diets. The Nordic diet is high in fat and sugar but also includes a range of traditional products with anticipated health-promoting effects. The aim of this cohort study was to determine whether a healthy Nordic food index consisting of fish, cabbage, rye bread, oatmeal, apples, pears and root vegetables was related to CRC incidence. Data were obtained from a prospective cohort study of 57,053 Danish men and women aged 50-64 years, of whom 1025 developed CRC (13 years' follow-up). Incidence rate ratios (IRR) with 95 % CI were calculated from Cox proportional hazard models. Women who strongly adhered to a healthy Nordic food index had a 35 % lower incidence of CRC than women with poor adherence (adjusted IRR, 0·65; 95 % CI 0·46, 0·94); a similar tendency was found for men. Women had a 9 % lower incidence of CRC per point adherence to the healthy Nordic food index, but no significant effect was found for men. A regional diet based on healthy Nordic food items was therefore associated with a lower incidence of CRC in women. The protective effect was of the same magnitude as previously found for the Mediterranean diet, suggesting that healthy regional diets should be promoted in order to ensure health; this will also preserve cultural heredity and the environment.
Notes
Erratum In: Br J Nutr. 2014 Feb;111(4):758-9
PubMed ID
22874538 View in PubMed
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Adherence to a Healthy Nordic Food Index Is Associated with a Lower Risk of Type-2 Diabetes--The Danish Diet, Cancer and Health Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273886
Source
Nutrients. 2015 Oct;7(10):8633-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2015
Author
Sandra Amalie Lacoppidan
Cecilie Kyrø
Steffen Loft
Anne Helnæs
Jane Christensen
Camilla Plambeck Hansen
Christina Catherine Dahm
Kim Overvad
Anne Tjønneland
Anja Olsen
Source
Nutrients. 2015 Oct;7(10):8633-44
Date
Oct-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - prevention & control
Diet - ethnology - standards
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
Type-2 diabetes (T2D) prevalence is rapidly increasing worldwide. Lifestyle factors, in particular obesity, diet, and physical activity play a significant role in the etiology of the disease. Of dietary patterns, particularly the Mediterranean diet has been studied, and generally a protective association has been identified. However, other regional diets are less explored.
The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between adherence to a healthy Nordic food index and the risk of T2D. The index consists of six food items: fish, cabbage, rye bread, oatmeal, apples and pears, and root vegetables.
Data was obtained from a prospective cohort study of 57,053 Danish men and women aged 50-64 years, at baseline, of whom 7366 developed T2D (median follow-up: 15.3 years). The Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess the association between the healthy Nordic food index and risk of T2D, adjusted for potential confounders.
Greater adherence to the healthy Nordic food index was significantly associated with lower risk of T2D after adjusting for potential confounders. An index score of 5-6 points (high adherence) was associated with a statistically significantly 25% lower T2D risk in women (HR: 0.75, 95%CI: 0.61-0.92) and 38% in men (HR: 0.62; 95%CI: 0.53-0.71) compared to those with an index score of 0 points (poor adherence).
Adherence to a healthy Nordic food index was found to be inversely associated with risk of T2D, suggesting that regional diets other than the Mediterranean may also be recommended for prevention of T2D.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26506373 View in PubMed
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Adherence to national food-based dietary guidelines and incidence of stroke: A cohort study of Danish men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299135
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(10):e0206242
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Sine Hammer Hansen
Kim Overvad
Camilla Plambeck Hansen
Christina Catherine Dahm
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(10):e0206242
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet Surveys - methods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Food
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Policy
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Stroke - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
National dietary guidelines are intended to promote primary prevention of lifestyle-related diseases, but little is known about their effectiveness in prevention of stroke.
We used the Danish cohort Diet, Cancer and Health (n = 57 053) to investigate whether adherence to the Danish food-based dietary guidelines was associated with risk of stroke. Adherence was assessed by the Danish Dietary Guidelines Index, score 0 [no adherence] to 6 [complete adherence]. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for stroke and subtypes of stroke in men and women separately.
Incident stroke was determined in 1357 men and 900 women during follow-up (median 12.5 years and 13.0 years, respectively). A higher Danish Dietary Guidelines Index score was inversely associated with total stroke in men but not in women. In men, a high Index score (=4) was also inversely associated with total ischemic stroke (hazard ratio 0.75, 95% confidence interval 0.65-0.86), large-artery atherosclerosis (hazard ratio 0.63, 95% confidence interval 0.44-0.92) and small artery occlusion (hazard ratio 0.68, 95% confidence interval 0.54-0.84) compared to a low Index score (
PubMed ID
30356304 View in PubMed
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Adherence to the Danish food-based dietary guidelines and risk of myocardial infarction: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299380
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2018 05; 21(7):1286-1296
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-2018
Author
Camilla Plambeck Hansen
Kim Overvad
Inge Tetens
Anne Tjønneland
Erik Thorlund Parner
Marianne Uhre Jakobsen
Christina Catherine Dahm
Author Affiliation
1Section for Epidemiology,Department of Public Health,Aarhus University,Bartholins Allé 2,DK-8000 Aarhus C,Denmark.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2018 05; 21(7):1286-1296
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Nutrition Policy
Nutritive Value
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
A direct way to evaluate food-based dietary guidelines is to assess if adherence is associated with development of non-communicable diseases. Thus, the objective was to develop an index to assess adherence to the 2013 Danish food-based dietary guidelines and to investigate the association between adherence to the index and risk of myocardial infarction (MI).
Population-based cohort study with recruitment of participants in 1993-1997. Information on dietary intake was collected at baseline using an FFQ and an index ranging from 0 to 6 points was created to assess adherence to the 2013 Danish food-based dietary guidelines. MI cases were identified by record linkage to the Danish National Patient Register and the Causes of Death Register. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) of MI.
Greater areas of Aarhus and Copenhagen, Denmark.
Men and women aged 50-64 years (n 55 021) from the Diet, Cancer and Health study.
A total of 3046 participants were diagnosed with first-time MI during a median follow-up of 16·9 years. A higher Danish Dietary Guidelines Index score was associated with a lower risk of MI. After adjustment for potential confounders, the hazard of MI was 13 % lower among men with a score of 3-
PubMed ID
29331164 View in PubMed
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Adipose organochlorine concentrations and risk of breast cancer among postmenopausal Danish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17245
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2005 Jan;14(1):67-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
Ole Raaschou-Nielsen
Marian Pavuk
Alain Leblanc
Pierre Dumas
Jean Philippe Weber
Anja Olsen
Anne Tjønneland
Kim Overvad
Jørgen H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Strandboulevarden 49, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark. ole@cancer.dk
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2005 Jan;14(1):67-74
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - chemistry
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - analysis
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Pesticide Residues - analysis
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Postmenopause
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Exposure to environmental organochlorines has been examined as a potential risk factor for human breast cancer with mixed results. Our purpose was to examine associations between organochlorines and the development of breast cancer in a large prospective study using stored adipose tissue. METHODS: We conducted a nested case-control study of 409 postmenopausal women who developed breast cancer and 409 controls selected from the 29,875 women enrolled in the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health cohort between 1993 and 1997. We measured concentrations of 14 pesticides and 18 polychlorinated biphenyls in adipose tissue, collected upon enrollment, and estimated relative risk (RR) of breast cancer using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: The results showed no higher risk of breast cancer among women with higher levels of any pesticides or polychlorinated biphenyls; the RR associated with the upper quartile of 1,1-dichloro-2, 2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene concentration was 0.7 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.5-1.2] contrasting the lower quartile, and for the sum of polychlorinated biphenyls the similar risk was 1.1 (95% CI, 0.7-1.7). We observed a pattern of substantially lower risk of estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer in association with higher levels of most of the pesticides and polychlorinated biphenyls; the RR for the higher quartile of 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene was 0.1 (95% CI, 0.0-0.5) and for the sum of polychlorinated biphenyls it was 0.3 (95% CI, 0.1-0.9). CONCLUSION: The results do not support that higher organochlorine body levels increase the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women. The interpretation of the inverse association for estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer is currently unclear.
PubMed ID
15668478 View in PubMed
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Adipose tissue content of alpha-linolenic acid and the risk of ischemic stroke and ischemic stroke subtypes: A Danish case-cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297397
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(6):e0198927
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Christian Sørensen Bork
Stine Krogh Venø
Søren Lundbye-Christensen
Marianne Uhre Jakobsen
Anne Tjønneland
Philip C Calder
Kim Overvad
Erik Berg Schmidt
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(6):e0198927
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - metabolism
Chromatography, Gas
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark
Exercise
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Smoking
Stroke - classification - diagnosis - etiology
Waist Circumference
alpha-Linolenic Acid - analysis
Abstract
The plant-derived omega-3 fatty acid alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) may reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.
We have investigated associations between the content of ALA in adipose tissue and the risk of ischemic stroke and its subtypes.
Incident cases of ischemic stroke among participants enrolled into the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort (n = 57,053) were identified by linkage with the Danish National Patient Register. Subsequently, all potential cases were validated and classified into ischemic stroke subtypes. The fatty acid composition of adipose tissue was determined by gas chromatography in cases and in a randomly drawn sub-cohort (n = 3500). Statistical analyses were performed using weighted Cox regression.
During a median of 13.4 years of follow-up, 1735 cases of total ischemic stroke were identified including 297 cases of large artery atherosclerosis, 772 cases of small-vessel occlusion, 99 cases of cardio-embolism, 91 cases with stroke of other etiology and 476 cases with stroke of undetermined etiology. The median content of ALA in adipose tissue within the sub-cohort was 0.84% (95% central range: 0.53-1.19%). Multivariable analyses showed a U-shaped association between adipose tissue content of ALA and the rate of total ischemic stroke, but this association was not statistically significant (p = 0.172). In analyses of ischemic stroke subtypes, we observed a statistically significant U-shaped association between ALA and the rate of ischemic stroke due to large artery atherosclerosis (p = 0.017), whereas no appreciable association was observed between ALA and the rate of small-vessel occlusion (p = 0.427). A positive but statistically non-significant association was observed between ALA and the rate of ischemic stroke due to cardio-embolism (p = 0.162).
The content of ALA in adipose tissue was statistically non-significantly U-shaped associated with risk of total ischemic stroke. For ischemic stroke subtypes a statistically significant, U-shaped association with large artery atherosclerosis was observed.
PubMed ID
29889889 View in PubMed
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Adipose tissue trans-fatty acids and changes in body weight and waist circumference.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105926
Source
Br J Nutr. 2014 Apr 14;111(7):1283-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-14-2014
Author
Camilla P Hansen
Tina L Berentzen
Jane N Østergaard
Christina C Dahm
Lars I Hellgren
Erik B Schmidt
Anne Tjønneland
Thorkild I A Sørensen
Kim Overvad
Marianne U Jakobsen
Author Affiliation
Section for Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Bartholins Allé 2, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2014 Apr 14;111(7):1283-91
Date
Apr-14-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue, White - metabolism
Biological Markers - metabolism
Biopsy, Needle
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Dietary Fats - adverse effects - metabolism
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Linoleic Acids, Conjugated - adverse effects - metabolism
Lost to Follow-Up
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - etiology - metabolism - pathology
Oleic Acids - adverse effects - metabolism
Questionnaires
Registries
Trans Fatty Acids - adverse effects - metabolism
Waist Circumference
Weight Gain
Abstract
Previous studies have suggested that the intake of trans-fatty acids (TFA) plays a role in the development of obesity. The proportions of adipose tissue fatty acids not synthesised endogenously in humans, such as TFA, usually correlate well with the dietary intake. Hence, the use of these biomarkers may provide a more accurate measure of habitual TFA intake than that obtained with dietary questionnaires. The objective of the present study was to investigate the associations between the proportions of specific TFA in adipose tissue and subsequent changes in weight and waist circumference (WC). The relative content of fatty acids in adipose tissue biopsies from a random sample of 996 men and women aged 50-64 years drawn from a Danish cohort study was determined by GC. Baseline data on weight, WC and potential confounders were available together with information on weight and WC 5 years after enrolment. The exposure measures were total trans-octadecenoic acids (18:1t), 18:1 ?6-10t, vaccenic acid (18:1 ?11t) and rumenic acid (18:2 ?9c, 11t). Data were analysed using multiple regression with cubic spline modelling. The median proportion of total adipose tissue 18:1t was 1.52% (90% central range 0.98, 2.19) in men and 1.47% (1.01, 2.19) in women. No significant associations were observed between the proportions of total 18:1t, 18:1 ?6-10t, vaccenic acid or rumenic acid and changes in weight or WC. The present study suggests that the proportions of specific TFA in adipose tissue are not associated with subsequent changes in weight or WC within the exposure range observed in this population.
PubMed ID
24286469 View in PubMed
Less detail

Air pollution from traffic and cancer incidence: a Danish cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132837
Source
Environ Health. 2011;10:67
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Ole Raaschou-Nielsen
Zorana J Andersen
Martin Hvidberg
Steen S Jensen
Matthias Ketzel
Mette Sørensen
Johnni Hansen
Steffen Loft
Kim Overvad
Anne Tjønneland
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. ole@cancer.dk
Source
Environ Health. 2011;10:67
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis - toxicity
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - chemically induced - classification - epidemiology
Nitrogen Oxides - analysis - toxicity
Residence Characteristics
Vehicle Emissions - analysis - toxicity
Abstract
Vehicle engine exhaust includes ultrafine particles with a large surface area and containing absorbed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, transition metals and other substances. Ultrafine particles and soluble chemicals can be transported from the airways to other organs, such as the liver, kidneys, and brain. Our aim was to investigate whether air pollution from traffic is associated with risk for other cancers than lung cancer.
We followed up 54,304 participants in the Danish Diet Cancer and Health cohort for 20 selected cancers in the Danish Cancer Registry, from enrolment in 1993-1997 until 2006, and traced their residential addresses from 1971 onwards in the Central Population Registry. We used modeled concentration of nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) and amount of traffic at the residence as indicators of traffic-related air pollution and used Cox models to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) after adjustment for potential confounders.
NO(x) at the residence was significantly associated with risks for cervical cancer (IRR, 2.45; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01;5.93, per 100 µg/m(3) NO(x)) and brain cancer (IRR, 2.28; 95% CI, 1.25;4.19, per 100 µg/m(3) NO(x)).
This hypothesis-generating study indicates that traffic-related air pollution might increase the risks for cervical and brain cancer, which should be tested in future studies.
Notes
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