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[Accidents in childhood and adolescence: a bibliographic review]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79394
Source
Rev Bras Enferm. 2006 May-Jun;59(3):344-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Martins Christine Baccarat de Godoy
Author Affiliation
Departamento de Enfermagem da Universidade Estadual de Londrina, PR.
Source
Rev Bras Enferm. 2006 May-Jun;59(3):344-8
Language
Portuguese
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Brazil
Child
Humans
Abstract
This study aims at reviewing the literature on accidents among young under the age of 15. Throughout Brazil, lesions and poisonings are responsible for 5 to 6 percent of total internments by the National Health System (SUS), generating 8 percent of the total hospital internment expenses. Sweden and Italy are the countries that have the lowest mortality rates related to external causes among youngsters under the age of 15. The rates of Denmark, Germany and Japan are regarded as intermediate. France, Belgium, Austria and Canada are regarded as countries with high mortality rates related to external causes among youngsters under the age of 15. Brazil together with the United States, Portugal, Mexico and Korea are considered countries with very high mortality rates related to childhood accidents, needing preventive actions. Furthermore, studies reinforce the importance of recognizing the nature and reality of childhood accidents in order to form a diagnosis that helps elaborate and accomplish specific prevention policies.
PubMed ID
17175725 View in PubMed
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Analysis of lipid-lowering therapy and factors affecting regularity of statin intake in patients with cardiovascular disease enrolled in the PROFILE registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279509
Source
Rev Port Cardiol. 2015 Feb;34(2):111-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Oleg Gaisenok
Sergey Martsevich
Svetlana Tripkosh
Yulia Lukina
Source
Rev Port Cardiol. 2015 Feb;34(2):111-6
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Portuguese
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - administration & dosage
Hypercholesterolemia - complications - drug therapy
Hypolipidemic Agents - therapeutic use
Male
Medication Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Moscow
Registries
Self Report
Abstract
The aim of this study was to analyze the quality of lipid-lowering therapy in a cohort of patients with cardiovascular disease enrolled in a Moscow-based registry, and to analyze the factors affecting the regularity of statin administration in this patient category.
The present study included all patients who successively sought medical advice in the Preventive Pharmacotherapy Department of the Ministry of Healthcare of the Russian Federation between May 1 and December 31, 2011 (n=274). Each patient was given a specially designed questionnaire in order to assess compliance with the prescribed treatment that included the following questions: (1) if they knew, according to the results of previous exams, that they had elevated cholesterol levels (yes, no, don't know); (2) what method of hypercholesterolemia correction they used (diet, medication, physical exercise, or other); (3) if they were taking any statins (regularly, no, irregularly); and (4) if yes, what statin preparation and what dose they were taking. Patients' compliance with statin therapy was assessed on the basis of the responses received and the regularity of statin intake.
The influence of various factors on regularity of statin intake in patients with cardiovascular disease was assessed by calculating odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for advanced age (>70 years) (OR 0.49); higher statin dose than standard (OR 0.49); hypertension (OR 1.659); history of acute cerebrovascular event (OR 2.019); diabetes (OR 1.023); coronary heart disease (CHD) (OR 4.357); history of myocardial infarction (MI) (OR 4.838); history of coronary angiography/percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) (OR 5.167).
Analysis of factors with impact on regular compliance with statin therapy showed that the following were most significant: CHD, history of MI, and history of PCI. Previous cerebrovascular events and presence of diabetes did not motivate these patients to take statins on a regular basis.
PubMed ID
25660463 View in PubMed
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[Contribution of day hospitals to psychiatry in the contemporary field of mental health in Quebec].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107081
Source
Cien Saude Colet. 2013 Oct;18(10):2929-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013

[Disciplinary Actions in Gynecology and Obstetrics in the North of Portugal from Year 2008 to 2012].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282370
Source
Acta Med Port. 2015 Mar-Apr;28(2):194-203
Publication Type
Article
Author
Francisco Silva
Manuel Rodrigues E Rodrigues
João Bernardes
Source
Acta Med Port. 2015 Mar-Apr;28(2):194-203
Language
Portuguese
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Gynecology - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Male
Malpractice - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Obstetrics - legislation & jurisprudence
Portugal
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Abstract
Disciplinary actions may have a significant impact in medical doctors' and patients' lives. The objective of this study was the assessment of the disciplinary actions in Obstetrics and Gynecology that occurred in the north of Portugal in years 2008 to 2012.
Retrospective descriptive study based on the anonymized data contained in the annual activity reports of Conselho Disciplinar da Seção Regional Norte da Ordem dos Médicos from 2008 to 2012. We calculated the proportion of disciplinary actions in Obstetrics and Gynaecology over the total number of registered specialists in that speciality. We also analysed the type of complainers, accused, institutions, complaints and decisions. For statistical inference proportions with 95% confidence intervals were estimated.
From years 2008 to 2012, we registered 1040 complaints in all medical specialities in the north of Portugal. Obstetrics and Gynecology was the forth most affected specialty, with a total of 54 complaints. Forty-three complaints were related with medical malpractice and if we only consider this type of complaint Obstetrics and Gynecology was the most affected specialty. The most frequent complainers and accused were, respectively, patients themselves and female physicians, with 41 to 60 years of age. Fifty-two complaints were archived without punishment while two still await conclusion.
The overall results of this study are in agreement with those reported by other authors.
Obstetrics and Gynecology was the forth speciality with highest risk for any disciplinary action in the north of Portugal in years 2008 to 2012 and the first one in relation with alleged negligence. All presented and already concluded complaints were archived without penalty, except two that are still under evaluation.
PubMed ID
26061510 View in PubMed
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[Drugs are the great problem of humankind].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217877
Source
Servir. 1994 Jul-Aug;42(4):216-8
Publication Type
Article

[Ergonomics aspect and musculoskeletal symptoms in a transport sector]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70798
Source
Rev Gaucha Enferm. 2004 Apr;25(1):33-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Rita de Cássia Rodrigues da Silva Célia
Neusa Maria Costa Alexandre
Author Affiliation
Departamento de Enfermagem da FCM da UNICAMP. lgronaldo@rantac.com.br
Source
Rev Gaucha Enferm. 2004 Apr;25(1):33-43
Date
Apr-2004
Language
Portuguese
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
English Abstract
Exertion - physiology
Female
Health Personnel
Human Engineering
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Muscular Diseases - diagnosis - prevention & control
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - prevention & control
Prevalence
Task Performance and Analysis
Transportation of Patients - manpower
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to identify the tasks ranked as the most stressful and to investigate the ocurrence of musculoskeletal symptoms among workers employed by a patient transport sector. The RPE (Rating of Perceived Exertion) scale of Borg was used to determine the rating of perceived physical exertion on the musculoskeletal system. Measures of musculoskeletal disorders was obtained using a modified version of the Nordic Questionnaire. The workers felt that all of the tasks related to patient transfer require intense physical exertion, with scores from 16.8 to 13.8. The workers reported high musculoskeletal complaints in several body regions, with highest prevalence in the low back.
PubMed ID
15675564 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of polymerase chain reaction in the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis in indigenous and non-indigenous patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165350
Source
J Bras Pneumol. 2006 May-Jun;32(3):234-40
Publication Type
Article
Author
Rose Mary Corrêa Santos
Mauricio Morishi Ogusku
José de Moraes Miranda
Maria Cristina Dos-Santos
Julia Ignez Salem
Author Affiliation
Hospital Universitário Getúlio Vargas, Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil.
Source
J Bras Pneumol. 2006 May-Jun;32(3):234-40
Language
English
Portuguese
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacteriological Techniques
DNA, Bacterial - analysis
Humans
Indians, South American
Mycobacterium tuberculosis - genetics - isolation & purification
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Sputum - microbiology
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - diagnosis
Abstract
To evaluate the accuracy of bacteriological methods and of polymerase chain reaction (with primers specific for IS6110 of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex) in testing sputum samples from indigenous (Amerindian) and non-indigenous patients.
A total of 214 sputum samples (154 from indigenous patients and 60 from non-indigenous patients) were analyzed in order to determine the accuracy of smear microscopy (direct and concentrated versions) for acid-fast bacilli, culture, and polymerase chain reaction.
Both microscopy methods presented low sensitivity in comparison with culture and polymerase chain reaction. Specificity ranged from 91% to 100%, the concentrated acid-fast smear technique being the least specific. Nontuberculous mycobacteria were isolated three times more frequently in samples from indigenous patients than in those from non-indigenous patients. False-positive and false-negative polymerase chain reaction results were more common in the indigenous population.
Positivity and isolation of nontuberculous mycobacteria in the acid-fast smear in conjunction with polymerase chain reaction positivity raise the following hypotheses: nontuberculous mycobacteria species with DNA regions homologous to, or even still possessing, the M. tuberculosis IS6110 exist in the Amazon; colonization of the oropharynx or of a tuberculous lesion accelerates the growth of the nontuberculous mycobacteria present in the sputum samples, making it impossible to isolate M. tuberculosis; A history of tuberculosis results in positivity for M. tuberculosis DNA. The absence of bacteriological positivity in the presence of polymerase chain reaction positivity raises questions regarding the inherent technical characteristics of the bacteriological methods or regarding patient history of tuberculosis.
Notes
Comment In: J Bras Pneumol. 2006 May-Jun;32(3):13-417278301
PubMed ID
17273613 View in PubMed
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[Health promotion and primary prevention strategies to fight chronic disease: a systematic review].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261913
Source
Rev Panam Salud Publica. 2013 Nov;34(5):343-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Luciana Saraiva da Silva
Rosângela Minardi Mitre Cotta
Carla de Oliveira Barbosa Rosa
Source
Rev Panam Salud Publica. 2013 Nov;34(5):343-50
Date
Nov-2013
Language
Portuguese
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Brazil
Child
Chronic Disease - prevention & control
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Global health
Health education
Health Policy
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Primary Prevention - organization & administration
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Abstract
To analyze health promotion and primary prevention strategies in the global fight against chronic noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) and to reflect on the challenges of overcoming these diseases.
In this systematic literature review, studies were analyzed on health programs identified by the Brazilian Health Ministry as the main global community intervention initiatives: the North Karelia Project, in Finland; the Stanford Three-Community Study, Stanford Five-City Project, Minnesota Heart Health and Pawtucket Heart Health Program, in the United States; the CINDI project, in Europe and Canada; CARMEN in South America; Mirame, in Chile; and Tianjin, in China. The LILACS, Medline, and SciELO databases were searched, as well as the Brazilian Health Ministry, Pan American Health Organization, and World Health Organization websites. Only original articles analyzing primary data were included. The outcomes evaluated in the studies were cholesterol, blood pressure, obesity, physical activity level, tobacco use, dietary habits, and other risk factors for NCDs.
Seventeen studies were selected. The North Karelia Project, Three Community Study, and Five-City Multifactor Risk Reduction Project contributed to decrease tobacco use, cholesterol levels, and blood pressure levels. The Minnesota Heart Health Program and the Pawtucket Heart Health Program had moderate success in reducing the risk factors for NCD. The CINDI and CARMEN programs demonstrated the importance of integrated actions for decreasing the main risk factors. The Mirame project, which focused on educational interventions for school children, reached 30,000 students in 2001 without requiring a large financial investment. The Tianjin project was able to reduce salt intake, prevalence of arterial hypertension, and obesity by restructuring primary health care services.
These successful experiences in community health improvement may serve as models for the implementation of more effective health policies, aiming at the development of actions that integrate health promotion and primary prevention of the main risk factors for NCDs.
PubMed ID
24553762 View in PubMed
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Source
Servir. 1993 Jul-Aug;41(4):201-2
Publication Type
Article
Author
S. Allagui
Source
Servir. 1993 Jul-Aug;41(4):201-2
Language
Portuguese
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Denmark
Health Services for the Aged
Home Care Services
Humans
PubMed ID
8211243 View in PubMed
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Homocysteine increase after acute myocardial infarction--can it explain the differences between case-control and cohort studies?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189028
Source
Rev Port Cardiol. 2002 May;21(5):575-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2002
Author
Eustáquio Gomes
Rita Duarte
R Palma Reis
António Cândido
Nuno Cardim
Maria João Correia
Susana Castela
Rui Cordeiro
Alexandra Ramos
Judite Lima Lobo
J F Martins Correia
Author Affiliation
Serviço de Cardologia do Hospital Pulido Valente, Lisboa, Portugal.
Source
Rev Port Cardiol. 2002 May;21(5):575-81
Date
May-2002
Language
English
Portuguese
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Markers - blood
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Fasting - blood
Female
Homocysteine - blood
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - blood
Time Factors
Abstract
Several case-control studies agree that elevated homocysteinemia (HC) is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, particularly for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, this agreement does not extend to prospective studies--some of which confirm and others (MRFIT and Karelia) reject this relation. After an AMI there are significant changes in biochemical and laboratory parameters, including a decrease in cholesterolemia, which takes several months to return to baseline levels. The evolution of HC after AMI is still unknown. In this work we set out to evaluate the evolution of homocysteinemia values after acute myocardial infarction. We evaluated fasting homocysteinemia in 34 sequential patients after admission to the Intensive Care Unit and after confirmation of acute myocardial infarction (26 male; mean age 63.8 +/- 13.9 years) in the first 36 hours, between the 3rd and 6th day, and one month after AMI. Simultaneously, we studied traditional risk factors and performed routine laboratory tests. The mean values found for HC were 13.85 +/- 5.46 mol/l in the first 36 hours after AMI, 16.16 +/- 6.63 mol/l between the 3rd and the 6th day, and 16.27 +/- 7.27 mol/l one month after myocardial infarction. The difference between the first and the second, and between the first and the third measurements, was significant (p
PubMed ID
12174520 View in PubMed
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27 records – page 1 of 3.