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Anthropology. Stories of Arctic colonization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256693
Source
Science. 2014 Aug 29;345(6200):1004-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-29-2014
Author
Robert W Park
Author Affiliation
Anthropology Department, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue W, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1, Canada. robert.park@uwaterloo.ca.
Source
Science. 2014 Aug 29;345(6200):1004-5
Date
Aug-29-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Genome, Human - genetics
Human Migration
Humans
Inuits - genetics
Notes
Comment On: Science. 2014 Aug 29;345(6200):125583225170159
PubMed ID
25170138 View in PubMed
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Analysis of autism susceptibility gene loci on chromosomes 1p, 4p, 6q, 7q, 13q, 15q, 16p, 17q, 19q and 22q in Finnish multiplex families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197947
Source
Mol Psychiatry. 2000 May;5(3):320-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
M. Auranen
T. Nieminen
S. Majuri
R. Vanhala
L. Peltonen
I. Järvelä
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Molecular Genetics, National Public Health Institute, Mannerheimintie 166, FIN-00300, Helsinki, Finland. mari.auranen@ktl.fi
Source
Mol Psychiatry. 2000 May;5(3):320-2
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Autistic Disorder - genetics
Child
Chromosome Mapping
Chromosomes, Human
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 1
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 10
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 13
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 16
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 17
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 4
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 6
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 7
Finland
Genetic Linkage
Genetic markers
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Nuclear Family
Abstract
The role of genetic factors in the etiology of the autistic spectrum of disorders has clearly been demonstrated. Ten chromosomal regions, on chromosomes 1p, 4p, 6q, 7q, 13q, 15q, 16p, 17q, 19q and 22q have potentially been linked to autism.1-8 We have analyzed these chromosomal regions in a total of 17 multiplex families with autism originating from the isolated Finnish population by pairwise linkage analysis and sib-pair analysis. Mild evidence for putative contribution was found only with the 1p chromosomal region in the susceptibility to autism. Our data suggest that additional gene loci exist for autism which will be detectable in and even restricted to the isolated Finnish population.
PubMed ID
10889536 View in PubMed
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Linkage analysis of putative schizophrenia gene candidate regions on chromosomes 3p, 5q, 6p, 8p, 20p and 22q in a population-based sampled Finnish family set.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204292
Source
Mol Psychiatry. 1998 Sep;3(5):452-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1998
Author
I. Hovatta
D. Lichtermann
H. Juvonen
J. Suvisaari
J D Terwilliger
R. Arajärvi
M L Kokko-Sahin
J. Ekelund
J. Lönnqvist
L. Peltonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Molecular Genetics, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland. iiris.hovatta@ktl.fi
Source
Mol Psychiatry. 1998 Sep;3(5):452-7
Date
Sep-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Chromosome Mapping
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 20
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 22
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 5
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 6
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 8
Family
Finland
Genetic Linkage
Genetic markers
Heterozygote
Humans
Schizophrenia - genetics
Abstract
During the past decade numerous studies have been published describing chromosomal regions potentially linked with schizophrenia. Unfortunately, none of these studies has been able to conclusively identify any specific gene that predisposes to schizophrenia. Typically evidence for linkage is seen on large chromosomal regions, as expected, containing tens or even hundreds of genes. Furthermore, attempts to replicate the findings have rarely been successful leaving a confusion about the existence of predisposing genes for schizophrenia in a particular region of the genome. We have carried out linkage analysis in a set of 62 pedigrees rising from a genetically isolated population of Finland with markers on six chromosomal regions earlier suggested to harbor predisposing genes for schizophrenia, namely 3p, 5q, 6p, 8p, 20p, and 22q. We were not able to find significant evidence for linkage on any of these chromosomal regions. However, some support for linkage was found on all studied chromosomal regions, except 3p.
PubMed ID
9774782 View in PubMed
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Source
J Law Med. 2008 May;15(5):665-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Bernadette McSherry
Leanna Darvall
Source
J Law Med. 2008 May;15(5):665-8
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Human Rights
Humans
Public Health
Abstract
The editorial introduces the special issue of the journal that incorporates papers originally presented at the "Public Health and Human Rights" conference held at the Monash Prato Centre, Italy, in June 2007. It identifies the intersection between public health and human rights; access to health care services, particularly for marginalised groups such as indigenous peoples and persons with mental illnesses; and the role of international instruments in encouraging states parties to implement and monitor compliance with these rights.
PubMed ID
18575166 View in PubMed
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Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Feb 5;124(3):394-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-5-2004
Author
Lasse Efskind
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Feb 5;124(3):394-5
Date
Feb-5-2004
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health facilities
Human Rights - legislation & jurisprudence
Humanism
Humans
Norway
Smoking - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Apr 1;124(7):983; author reply 98315060661
PubMed ID
14963524 View in PubMed
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Susceptibility loci for atopic dermatitis on chromosomes 3, 13, 15, 17 and 18 in a Swedish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189945
Source
Hum Mol Genet. 2002 Jun 15;11(13):1539-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-2002
Author
M. Bradley
C. Söderhäll
H. Luthman
C-F Wahlgren
I. Kockum
M. Nordenskjöld
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institutet at Karolinska Hospital, SE-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Hum Mol Genet. 2002 Jun 15;11(13):1539-48
Date
Jun-15-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chromosome Mapping
Chromosomes, Human
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 13
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 15
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 17
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 18
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3
Computer simulation
Dermatitis, Atopic - genetics - physiopathology
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Lod Score
Male
Microsatellite Repeats
Sweden
Abstract
Atopic dermatitis is a hereditary, pruritic, inflammatory and chronic skin disease that typically presents in early childhood and may continue or recur later. The etiology of atopic dermatitis is unknown, but several lines of evidence indicate that it is a multifactorial disorder caused by the combined influence of genetic and environmental factors, even though the relative contributions of genes and environment are not known. To identify important loci that contribute to the development of atopic dermatitis, we conducted a genome-wide linkage analysis with 367 microsatellite markers, using a non-parametric affected relative-pair method in 109 pedigrees. Three qualitative phenotypes and one semi-quantitative phenotype were studied. For the phenotype atopic dermatitis, linkage to chromosome region 3p24-22 was found. For another phenotype, atopic dermatitis combined with raised allergen-specific IgE levels, a suggestive linkage was found to chromosome region 18q21. For the semi-quantitative phenotype severity score of atopic dermatitis, suggestive linkage was found to chromosome regions 3q14, 13q14, 15q14-15 and 17q21. Identifying chromosome regions linked to susceptibility genes for atopic dermatitis provides a platform from which the search for atopic dermatitis genes can proceed.
PubMed ID
12045207 View in PubMed
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HIV/AIDS and human rights: we've only just begun.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174071
Source
HIV AIDS Policy Law Rev. 2005 Apr;10(1):1, 7-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Joanne Csete
Source
HIV AIDS Policy Law Rev. 2005 Apr;10(1):1, 7-13
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
HIV Infections
Human Rights
Humans
Abstract
Public health and human rights often used to be seen as incompatible frameworks for action. HIV/AIDS was supposed to break that mould and be the epidemic where respecting human rights would be the most effective way to achieve the public health goal of conquering the epidemic. In this article, Joanne Csete suggests that while in theory everybody buys into the effectiveness of rights-based approaches to HIV/AIDS, the practice leaves much to be desired. The author describes the human rights framework that is the foundation for a more effective response to HIV/AIDS and stresses the urgency of paying more than lip service to the need to put human rights at the centre of the fight against HIV/AIDS in Canada and beyond.
PubMed ID
15991364 View in PubMed
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Ukrainian survey of PLHA rights reveals widespread abuses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7146
Source
HIV AIDS Policy Law Rev. 2005 Apr;10(1):47-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Tetanya Deshko
Source
HIV AIDS Policy Law Rev. 2005 Apr;10(1):47-8
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Data Collection
Human Rights
Humans
Ukraine
Abstract
A survey conducted in 2004 by the All-Ukrainian Network of People Living with HIV found that HIV-related rights violations are widespread in Ukrainian society, and that many people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA) are ignorant of the provisions of HIV/AIDS-related legislation.
PubMed ID
15991379 View in PubMed
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The peopling of Greenland: further insights from the analysis of genetic diversity using autosomal and X-chromosomal markers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266769
Source
Eur J Hum Genet. 2015 Feb;23(2):245-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Vania Pereira
Carmen Tomas
Juan J Sanchez
Denise Syndercombe-Court
António Amorim
Leonor Gusmão
Maria João Prata
Niels Morling
Source
Eur J Hum Genet. 2015 Feb;23(2):245-51
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chromosomes, Human, X - genetics
Genetic markers
Genetic Variation
Greenland
Human Migration
Humans
Inuits - genetics
Abstract
The peopling of Greenland has a complex history shaped by population migrations, isolation and genetic drift. The Greenlanders present a genetic heritage with components of European and Inuit groups; previous studies using uniparentally inherited markers in Greenlanders have reported evidence of a sex-biased, admixed genetic background. This work further explores the genetics of the Greenlanders by analysing autosomal and X-chromosomal data to obtain deeper insights into the factors that shaped the genetic diversity in Greenlanders. Fourteen Greenlandic subsamples from multiple geographical settlements were compared to assess the level of genetic substructure in the Greenlandic population. The results showed low levels of genetic diversity in all sets of the genetic markers studied, together with an increased number of X-chromosomal loci in linkage disequilibrium in relation to the Danish population. In the broader context of worldwide populations, Greenlanders are remarkably different from most populations, but they are genetically closer to some Inuit groups from Alaska. Admixture analyses identified an Inuit component in the Greenlandic population of approximately 80%. The sub-populations of Ammassalik and Nanortalik are the least diverse, presenting the lowest levels of European admixture. Isolation-by-distance analyses showed that only 16% of the genetic substructure of Greenlanders is most likely to be explained by geographic barriers. We suggest that genetic drift and a differentiated settlement history around the island explain most of the genetic substructure of the population in Greenland.
Notes
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Cites: Forensic Sci Int Genet. 2009 Sep;3(4):e145-619647703
Cites: Nature. 2010 Feb 11;463(7282):757-6220148029
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PubMed ID
24801759 View in PubMed
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260068 records – page 1 of 26007.