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Alcoholism and risk for cancer of the cervix uteri, vagina, and vulva.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19635
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2001 Aug;10(8):899-901
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
E. Weiderpass
W. Ye
R. Tamimi
D. Trichopolous
O. Nyren
H. Vainio
H O Adami
Author Affiliation
International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. Weiderpass@iarc.fr
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2001 Aug;10(8):899-901
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - complications
Carcinoma in Situ - complications - etiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Invasiveness
Odds Ratio
Papillomavirus, Human - pathogenicity
Papovaviridae Infections - complications
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Tumor Virus Infections - complications
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Vaginal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Vaginal Smears
Vulvar Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
We conducted a population-based cohort study to analyze the risk of developing cancers of the female genitals among 36,856 patients with a hospital discharge diagnosis of alcoholism (ICD-7: 307, 322; ICD-8: 291, 303; ICD-9: 291, 303, 305A) in Sweden between 1965 and 1995. The follow-up was done by linkages of national registries. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed based on nationwide specific cancer rates. The first year of follow-up was excluded from all analyses to minimize the impact of selection bias. We found that alcoholic women had excess risks for in situ cervical cancer (SIR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.6-1.9), for invasive cervical cancer (SIR, 2.9; 95% CI, 2.4-3.5), and for cancer of the vagina (SIR, 4.6; 95% CI, 2.2-8.5) but not for cancer of the vulva (SIR, 1.0; 95% CI, 0.4-2.0). The fact that alcoholics had an excess risk also for the in situ cancer suggests that the observed excess in invasive cervical cancer may not only be attributable to less use of Pap smear screening among them. The alcoholic women may be at higher risk for the progression from human papillomavirus infection to a malignant lesion for lifestyle-related reasons (promiscuity, smoking, use of contraceptive hormones, and dietary deficiencies). We conclude that alcoholic women are at high risk for in situ and invasive cervical cancer and for cancer of the vagina.
PubMed ID
11489758 View in PubMed
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Changing trends in genital herpes simplex virus infection in Bergen, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197504
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2000 Aug;79(8):693-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
A. Nilsen
H. Myrmel
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatovenerology, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2000 Aug;79(8):693-6
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Female
Herpes Genitalis - epidemiology - virology
Herpesvirus 1, Human - pathogenicity
Herpesvirus 2, Human - pathogenicity
Humans
Incidence
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Abstract
To document the proportion of each herpes simplex virus (HSV) type in genital HSV infection and changes over time during a 10 year period.
Retrospective comparative study in sexually transmitted disease (STD) patients with genital HSV infection at the outpatient clinic for STD, Haukeland Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
HSV-2 was the major cause during the 80's, whereas HSV-1 constitutes a greater part of the cases during the 90's, especially in female patients and in the younger age groups with primary or initial disease, where HSV-1 is the causative viral type in up to 70-90% of the cases.
The documented change from HSV-2 towards HSV-1 in cases of genital HSV infection may have implications as to prognosis, future usefulness of vaccines, present and future usefulness of new type-specific serological tests.
PubMed ID
10949236 View in PubMed
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A comparative study of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) prophylaxis in premature infants within the Canadian Registry of Palivizumab (CARESS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124798
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2012 Oct;31(10):2703-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
B. Paes
I. Mitchell
A. Li
K L Lanctôt
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2012 Oct;31(10):2703-11
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized - administration & dosage
Antiviral Agents - administration & dosage
Birth weight
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Gestational Age
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Male
Pregnancy
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - virology
Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human - pathogenicity
Seasons
Smoking - adverse effects
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
We examined the dosing regimens, compliance, and outcomes of premature infants who received palivizumab within the Canadian Registry of Palivizumab (CARESS). Infants receiving =1 dose of palivizumab during the 2006-2011 respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) seasons were recruited across 30 sites. Respiratory illness events were captured monthly. Infants =32 completed weeks gestational age (GA) (Group 1) were compared to 33-35 completed weeks GA infants (Group 2) following prophylaxis. In total, 6,654 patients were analyzed (Group 1, n?=?5,183; Group 2, n?=?1,471). The mean GA was 29.9?±?2.9 versus 34.2?±?2.2 weeks for Groups 1 and 2, respectively. Group differences were significant (all p-values 5 household individuals, birth weight, and enrolment age. Overall, infants received 92.6 % of expected injections. Group 1 received significantly more injections, but a greater proportion of Group 2 received injections within recommended intervals. The hospitalization rates were similar for Groups 1 and 2 for respiratory illness (4.7 % vs. 3.7 %, p?=?0.1) and RSV (1.5 % vs. 1.4 %, p?=?0.3). Neither the time to first respiratory illness [hazard ratio?=?0.9, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.7-1.2, p?=?0.5] nor to first RSV hospitalization (hazard ratio?=?1.3, 95 % CI 0.8-2.2, p?=?0.3) were different. Compliance with RSV prophylaxis is high. Despite the higher number of palivizumab doses in infants =32 completed weeks GA, the two groups' respiratory illness and RSV-positive hospitalization rates were similar.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22546928 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of varicella zoster virus infection morbidity and mortality in pancreas and kidney-pancreas transplant recipients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115911
Source
Transplant Proc. 2013 Mar;45(2):701-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
E. Netchiporouk
J. Tchervenkov
S. Paraskevas
D. Sasseville
R. Billick
Author Affiliation
Division of Dermatology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Transplant Proc. 2013 Mar;45(2):701-4
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antiviral agents - therapeutic use
Chickenpox - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality - therapy - virology
Female
Herpes Zoster - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality - therapy - virology
Herpesvirus 3, Human - pathogenicity
Hospitalization
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - adverse effects
Incidence
Kidney Transplantation - adverse effects - mortality
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Neuralgia, Postherpetic - epidemiology - virology
Pancreas Transplantation - adverse effects - mortality
Prognosis
Quebec - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Time Factors
Abstract
Solid organ transplant recipients are at increased risk of infection due to chronic immunosuppression. The incidence of varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection is known to be increased in these patients compared with the immunocompetent population. Previous reports suggested that these patients are likely to experience a morbid disease course. Few data currently exist on the course of VZV infections in pancreas or pancreas plus kidney (PK) transplant recipients.
The goal of this study was to evaluate the incidence and severity of VZV infections in pancreas or PK recipients.
We analyzed the transplantation patient database of the Royal Victoria Hospital, identifying 137 pancreas or PK transplantation procedures performed between January 1999 and October 2010, among which we included 98 patients in the study. We subsequently performed a retrospective chart review to evaluate the incidence and severity of VZV infections posttransplantation.
Our analysis revealed that 11/98 patients developed VZV infections. The majority of infections (~90.9%) occurred within the first 5 years. Most patients (63.6%) were treated on an outpatient basis, whereas only 4 (36.4%) were hospitalized with a mean hospital stay of 9.5 ± 8.42 days. The initial immunosuppressive regimen remained unchanged for the majority of patients. All patients experienced a mild disease course without intensive care unit admission or death. Only 3 patients (27.3%) developed postherpetic neuralgia.
These findings suggest that with timely diagnosis and proper treatment, most patients recover well from a VZV infection.
PubMed ID
23453544 View in PubMed
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Exploring the dynamics of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) transmission in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286771
Source
Theor Popul Biol. 2016 Aug;110:78-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Alexandra B Hogan
Kathryn Glass
Hannah C Moore
Robert S Anderssen
Source
Theor Popul Biol. 2016 Aug;110:78-85
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Disease Outbreaks
Epidemics
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Models, Statistical
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - transmission
Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human - pathogenicity
Respiratory Syncytial Viruses - growth & development
Seasons
Western Australia - epidemiology
Abstract
Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the main cause of lower respiratory tract infections in children. Whilst highly seasonal, RSV dynamics can have either one-year (annual) or two-year (biennial) cycles. Furthermore, some countries show a 'delayed biennial' pattern, where the epidemic peak in low incidence years is delayed. We develop a compartmental model for RSV infection, driven by a seasonal forcing function, and conduct parameter space and bifurcation analyses to document parameter ranges that give rise to these different seasonal patterns. The model is sensitive to the birth rate, transmission rate, and seasonality parameters, and can replicate RSV dynamics observed in different countries. The seasonality parameter must exceed a threshold for the model to produce biennial cycles. Intermediate values of the birth rate produce the greatest delay in these biennial cycles, while the model reverts to annual cycles if the duration of immunity is too short. Finally, the existence of period doubling and period halving bifurcations suggests robust model dynamics, in agreement with the known regularity of RSV outbreaks. These findings help explain observed RSV data, such as regular biennial dynamics in Western Australia, and delayed biennial dynamics in Finland. From a public health perspective, our findings provide insight into the drivers of RSV transmission, and a foundation for exploring RSV interventions.
PubMed ID
27155294 View in PubMed
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Herpes simplex virus and risk of cervical cancer: a longitudinal, nested case-control study in the nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18846
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2002 Oct 15;156(8):687-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-2002
Author
Matti Lehtinen
Pentti Koskela
Egil Jellum
Aini Bloigu
Tarja Anttila
Göran Hallmans
Tiina Luukkaala
Steinar Thoresen
Linda Youngman
Joakim Dillner
Matti Hakama
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, University of Tampere, Finland. llmale@uta.fi
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2002 Oct 15;156(8):687-92
Date
Oct-15-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Carcinoma - epidemiology - etiology - virology
Case-Control Studies
Cell Transformation, Neoplastic
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Herpes Genitalis - complications
Herpesvirus 2, Human - pathogenicity
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Papillomavirus Infections - complications
Papillomavirus, Human - pathogenicity
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Tumor Virus Infections - complications
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - virology
Abstract
Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) play the major role in cervical carcinogenesis. The authors reevaluated the role of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) in this multistage process by conducting a longitudinal, nested case-control study using 1974-1993 data and comparing the results with those from a meta-analysis of studies. A Nordic cohort of 550,000 women was followed up for an average of 5 years, after which 178 cervical carcinoma cases and 527 controls were identified. HSV-2; HPV-16, HPV-18, and HPV-33; and Chlamydia trachomatis antibodies were determined at baseline by HSV-2 glycoprotein gG-2 and HPV virus-like-particle enzyme immunoassays and by using the microimmunofluorescence method. The relative risk of cervical carcinoma was calculated by conditional logistic regression. Longitudinal studies on HSV-2 and cervical neoplasia were identified through MEDLINE (National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland), and weighted mean relative risks were calculated. Smoking (relative risk = 1.6, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1, 2.3) and HPV-16/HPV-18/HPV-33 (relative risk = 2.9, 95% CI: 1.9, 4.3) were both associated with cervical carcinoma. The smoking- and HPV-16/HPV-18/HPV-33-adjusted relative risks for HSV-2 were 1.0 (95% CI: 0.6, 1.7) and 0.7 (95% CI: 0.3, 1.6), respectively, for HPV seropositives. In the meta-analysis, the relative risk for HSV-2 was 0.9 (95% CI: 0.6, 1.3). In both sets of data, HSV-2 did not play a role in cervical carcinogenesis.
PubMed ID
12370156 View in PubMed
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Herpes simplex virus type 2 infections of the central nervous system: A retrospective study of 49 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161405
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2008;40(1):59-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Lars Haukali Omland
Bent Faber Vestergaard
Johan Heugh Wandall
Author Affiliation
From the Department of Infectious Diseases M, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2008;40(1):59-62
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Encephalitis, Herpes Simplex - cerebrospinal fluid - epidemiology
Female
Herpesvirus 2, Human - pathogenicity
Humans
Incidence
Male
Meningitis, Viral - cerebrospinal fluid - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infections of the central nervous system (CNS) are rare with meningitis as the most common clinical presentation. We have investigated the clinical spectrum of CNS infections in 49 adult consecutive patients with HSV-2 genome in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). HSV-2 in the CSF was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and patients were diagnosed as encephalitis or meningitis according to predefined clinical criteria by retrospective data information from consecutive clinical journals. The annual crude incidence rate of HSV-2 CNS disease was 0.26 per 100,000. 43 (88%) had meningitis of whom 8 (19%) had recurring lymphocytic meningitis. Six patients (12%) had encephalitis. 11 of 49 patients (22%) had sequelae recorded during follow-up. None died as a result of HSV-2 CNS disease. Thus, the clinical presentation of HSV-2 infection of the CNS is mainly meningitis but encephalitis does occur and neurological sequelae are common. Recurring lymphocytic meningitis is associated with reactivation of HSV-2 and the condition might be underdiagnosed.
PubMed ID
17852910 View in PubMed
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Human enteric pathogens in dogs in central Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298771
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Alaska Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-64-10. 9 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
September 1964
  1 document  
Author
Buler, C.E.
Herd, B.R.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Alaska Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-64-10. 9 p.
Date
September 1964
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
565209
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Dogs
Epidemiology
Human pathogens
Abstract
A 12-month's study in Central Alaska shows that family pets are harboring a significant quantity of human intestinal pathogens. While previous investigators in Alaska have found up to 7% of the dogs harboring either Salmonella or Shigella, this study found approximately 18% harboring these plus an additional 9% harboring related, potentially pathogenic organisms. In addition, the study shows that dogs in the area (1) can harbor multiple species of Salmonella at one time, (2) appear to act as transient carriers, and (3) do not necessarily show signs of intestinal infection when the organisms are present. The organisms were found in the animals throughout the year. As a result of the long severe winter, the family pet usually lives in close proximity to human friends; thus it becomes a potential vector of some significance.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.64-10
Documents
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Human papillomavirus infection as a risk factor for anal and perianal skin cancer in a prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19056
Source
Br J Cancer. 2002 Jul 1;87(1):61-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-2002
Author
T. Bjørge
A. Engeland
T. Luostarinen
J. Mork
R E Gislefoss
E. Jellum
P. Koskela
M. Lehtinen
E. Pukkala
S Ø Thoresen
J. Dillner
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, 0310 Oslo, Norway. tone.bjorge@oslo.online.no
Source
Br J Cancer. 2002 Jul 1;87(1):61-4
Date
Jul-1-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Antibodies, Viral - analysis
Anus Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - virology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology - etiology - virology
Epidemiologic Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - analysis
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Papillomavirus Infections - complications
Papillomavirus, Human - pathogenicity
Prospective Studies
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Tumor Virus Infections - complications
Abstract
Human papillomavirus has emerged as the leading infectious cause of cervical and other anogenital cancers. We have studied the relation between human papillomavirus infection and the subsequent risk of anal and perianal skin cancer. A case-cohort study within two large Nordic serum banks to which about 760 000 individuals had donated serum samples was performed. Subjects who developed anal and perianal skin cancer during follow up (median time of 10 years) were identified by registry linkage with the nationwide cancer registries in Finland and Norway. Twenty-eight cases and 1500 controls were analysed for the presence of IgG antibodies to HPV 16, 18, 33 or 73, and odds ratios of developing anal and perianal skin cancer were calculated. There was an increased risk of developing anal and perianal skin cancer among subjects seropositive for HPV 16 (OR=3.0; 95%CI=1.1-8.2) and HPV 18 (OR=4.4; 95%CI=1.1-17). The highest risks were seen for HPV 16 seropositive patients above the age of 45 years at serum sampling and for patients with a lag time of less than 10 years. This study provides prospective epidemiological evidence of an association between infection with HPV 16 and 18 and anal and perianal skin cancer.
Notes
Erratum In: Br J Cancer. 2004 Sep 13;91(6):1226
PubMed ID
12085257 View in PubMed
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Impact of severe disease caused by respiratory syncytial virus in children living in developed countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3455
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2003 Feb;22(2 Suppl):S13-8; discussion S18-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Eric A Simoes
Xavier Carbonell-Estrany
Author Affiliation
Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and The Children's Hospital, Denver, CO, USA.
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2003 Feb;22(2 Suppl):S13-8; discussion S18-20
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Gestational Age
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care Units - statistics & numerical data
Male
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections - pathology - therapy
Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human - pathogenicity
Risk factors
Seasons
Spain - epidemiology
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Among industrialized nations, the rate of rehospitalization in the United States for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is approximately 30 per 1000, exceptions being noted for American Indians and Alaskan natives, two ethnic groups who tend toward higher rates of RSV hospitalization. In distinction Japan reports an admission rate of 60 per 1000 for RSV disease. Yet Japan ranks considerably lower than many of its western counterparts in premature births. Whether an RSV subtype, a new viral genotype or some other unifying characteristic exists that might explain the severity of adenovirus, parainfluenza and RSV infections in this region of Asia remains to be determined. Outcomes trials in the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Denmark and Japan all identified crowding and exposure to tobacco smoke as significant and independent risk factors for disease severity of RSV. The epidemiology of RSV is largely consistent throughout Europe, with peak outbreaks occurring in December and January. In Europe RSV accounts for 42 to 45% of hospital admissions for lower respiratory tract infections in children younger than 2 years of age, and inpatient populations tend to be younger and to experience greater disease severity. For RSV bronchiolitis lengths of stay in European hospitals range from a low of 4 days to a high of 10 days.The Infección Respiratoria Infantil por Virus Respiratorio Sincitial Study Group in Spain conducted 2 prospective observational studies in 14 and 26 neonatal units, respectively, on nonprophylaxed neonates to determine hospitalization rates for respiratory syncytial viral illness during 2 consecutive RSV seasons. Throughout each respiratory season the study group followed premature infants of
PubMed ID
12671448 View in PubMed
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16 records – page 1 of 2.