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Bringing home the right to food in Canada: challenges and possibilities for achieving food security.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164472
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Jun;10(6):566-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Karen Rideout
Graham Riches
Aleck Ostry
Don Buckingham
Rod MacRae
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Land and Food Systems, University of British Columbia, 2357 main mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, V6T 124. krideout@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Jun;10(6):566-73
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Altruism
Canada
Food Supply - standards
Human Rights - standards
Humans
International Cooperation
Nutrition Policy
Politics
Relief Work
Social Responsibility
Abstract
We offer a critique of Canada's approach to domestic food security with respect to international agreements, justiciability and case law, the breakdown of the public safety net, the institutionalisation of charitable approaches to food insecurity, and the need for 'joined-up' food and nutrition policies. We examined Canada's commitments to the right to food, as well as Canadian policies, case law and social trends, in order to assess Canada's performance with respect to the human right to food. We found that while Canada has been a leader in signing international human rights agreements, including those relating to the right to food, domestic action has lagged and food insecurity increased. We provide recommendations for policy changes that could deal with complex issues of state accountability, social safety nets and vulnerable populations, and joined-up policy frameworks that could help realise the right to adequate food in Canada and other developed nations.
PubMed ID
17381908 View in PubMed
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Child and adolescent mental health policy and plans in Canada: an analytical review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145245
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2010 Feb;55(2):100-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Stan Kutcher
Mary Jane Hampton
Jeffrey Wilson
Author Affiliation
IWK Health Centre and Dalhousie University Department of Psychiatry, 5850-5980 University Avenue, Halifax, Nova Scotia. skutcher@dal.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2010 Feb;55(2):100-7
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - standards
Canada
Child
Female
Health Planning - standards
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Human Rights - standards
Humans
Information Systems - standards
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - prevention & control - therapy
Mental health
Mental Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Psychotropic Drugs - therapeutic use
Quality of Health Care - standards
Staff Development - standards
World Health Organization
Abstract
Child and adolescent mental disorders are common, with a substantial disease burden, yet services for young people are nationally inadequate. As services should be based on policies and (or) plans, we analyzed the availability and content of child and adolescent mental health policies and plans in all provinces and territories.
The World Health Organization (WHO) framework for Child and Adolescent Mental Health Policy and Plans was applied.
Four provinces in Canada have a child and adolescent mental health policy and (or) plan. The other provinces do not have a policy or plan in place, or else try to integrate these components into existing mental health strategies. Among the policies and plans that exist, there is substantial variability regarding content as well as degree of adherence to the WHO template. Five essential content areas: legislation and human rights, information systems, quality improvement, improving access to and use of psychotropics, and human resource development and training are poorly or very poorly addressed in existing policies and (or) plans.
This lack of specific policy and (or) plans for child and adolescent mental health care and the variability of content in plans that exist may help explain why child and adolescent mental health services are poorly developed across Canada. We suggest that a national child and adolescent mental health policy framework be developed for Canada so that the provinces and territories may be encouraged to create or amend their current child and adolescent mental health frameworks in a manner that may enhance national cohesion and commonly addresses service needs in this population.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Psychiatry. 2010 Nov;55(11):746; author reply 74621110467
PubMed ID
20181305 View in PubMed
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Do personal assistance activities promote participation for persons with disabilities in Sweden?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294940
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2017 12; 39(24):2512-2521
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
12-2017
Author
Heléne von Granitz
Ieva Reine
Karin Sonnander
Ulrika Winblad
Author Affiliation
a Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences , Uppsala University , Uppsala , Sweden.
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2017 12; 39(24):2512-2521
Date
12-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Disabled Persons - psychology - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
Female
Healthcare Disparities
Human Rights - standards
Humans
Independent Living - standards
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Public Policy
Social Participation
Social Security - standards
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To examine how the right to participation according to Article 19 of the United Nations' Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) is promoted by personal assistance use in Sweden across age, gender and eligible person categories.
Register data and data from a questionnaire were used (N?=?15,289). Principal component analysis was performed and the internal consistency was tested. Descriptive statistics (?2 test) were used across age, gender and eligible person categories and components.
An uneven distribution of personal assistance across the components Health and Care; Home, Leisure and Social Interaction; and Daily Occupation was found. Significant differences in personal assistance reported were found between children and adults, men and women and between the three eligible person categories.
The discrepancy between reported and expected outcome of personal assistance indicates that Article 19 of the UNCRPD has not been met. The unequal access to participation across age, gender and eligible person categories would seem to further signify that the Act concerning Support and Service for Persons with Certain Functional Impairments is promoting activities of a caring nature rather than fulfilling Article 19 of the UNCRPD, i.e. ensuring full participation in society. IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION Government assistance allowance were granted for predominantly health and care, i.e. basic needs presenting risk of undermining the intention of participation in society. Men reported more personal assistance use for activities promoting participation than women. The discrepancy found between reported and expected outcome of personal assistance underlines the importance of service providers and administrative officials being sensitive to policy intentions. There is a need of guidelines for service providers and administrative officials to promote disability rights of participation for persons eligible for personal assistance.
PubMed ID
27796138 View in PubMed
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Health care access and support for disabled women in Canada: falling short of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130786
Source
Womens Health Issues. 2012 Jan-Feb;22(1):e111-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Barbara E Gibson
Roxanne Mykitiuk
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. barbara.gibson@utoronto.ca
Source
Womens Health Issues. 2012 Jan-Feb;22(1):e111-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Disabled Persons
Female
Focus Groups
Health Services Accessibility
Human Rights - standards
Humans
Middle Aged
Prejudice
Qualitative Research
Reproductive Health Services
United Nations
Young Adult
Abstract
The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and other international human rights conventions guarantee the fundamental human rights to physical, social, and psychological health. The purpose of this study was to examine whether these rights are being upheld in Canada for disabled women.
An interpretive, qualitative, focus group design was employed. Participants were women 18 to 67 years of age with a self-identified physical, sensory, cognitive, and/or psychiatric impairment. Eleven focus groups were conducted with 74 disabled women from urban and rural settings in Northern Ontario, Manitoba, and Nova Scotia. The data were analyzed for themes using a flexible coding system derived from and consistent with the research objectives and the study's human rights framework.
Participants described multiple intersecting factors that impeded or facilitated access to health care. Services included both generic health services and impairment-specific services. Participants experienced a number of barriers accessing professionals, support programs, and services. These are described under three broad themes: 1) Labyrinthine health service 'systems,' 2) assumptions, attitudes, and discriminatory practices, and 3) inadequate sexual health or reproductive services and supports.
The results suggest that Canada falls significantly short of guaranteeing disabled women's human rights to access health care supports and services. Access barriers resulted from the inefficiencies and complexities of the multiple agencies and programs that disabled women had to navigate, difficulties accessing information on available services, and negative attitudes of some health and social service providers.
PubMed ID
21968028 View in PubMed
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Human rights and ethical considerations in oral health research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156812
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2008 Jun;74(5):439
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Richard P Ellen
Richard Singleton
Author Affiliation
CIHR in Matrix Dynamics, Dental Research Institute, University of Toronto, Faculty of dentistry, 124 Edward Street, Toronto ON M5G 1G6. richard.ellen@dentistry.utoronto.ca
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2008 Jun;74(5):439
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Trials as Topic - standards
Conflict of Interest
Dental Research - ethics - standards
Ethics Committees, Research - organization & administration - standards
Human Experimentation - ethics - standards
Human Rights - standards
Humans
Informed consent
International Cooperation
Oral Health
Truth Disclosure
Abstract
Although international agreements set the framework for research ethics, countries vary in their interpretation and execution. The Government of Canada guidelines are based on the Tri-council policy statement: ethical conduct for research involving humans (2005) and the new CIHR guidelines for health research involving Aboriginal people (2007). In this critical review, we address 3 areas of educational value to practitioners who care for the oral health needs of the public, research trainees and research investigators who advance knowledge pertaining to oral health: protection of human study participants, conflicts of interest and investigator integrity. Its main message is that ethical health care should be supported by a strong foundation of ethical research.
PubMed ID
18538067 View in PubMed
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Issues in Islamic biomedical ethics: a primer for the pediatrician.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193098
Source
Pediatrics. 2001 Oct;108(4):965-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2001
Author
K M Hedayat
R. Pirzadeh
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan, USA. khedayat@stanford.edu
Source
Pediatrics. 2001 Oct;108(4):965-71
Date
Oct-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Death
Bioethics
Child
Child Development - classification
Child Rearing
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Human Rights - standards
Humans
Islam - psychology
Jurisprudence
Male
Parenting - psychology
Religion and Medicine
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The United States is becoming increasingly pluralistic. Pediatricians must become familiar with the factors that affect the emotional, physical, and spiritual health of their patients that are outside the kin of the traditionally dominant value system. Although many articles have addressed the cultural and ethnic factors, very few have considered the impact of religion. Islam, as the largest and fastest-growing religion in the world, has adherent throughout the world, including the United States, with 50% of US Muslims being indigenous converts. Islam presents a complete moral, ethical, and medical framework that, while it sometimes concurs, at times diverges or even conflicts with the US secular ethical framework. This article introduces the pediatrician to the Islamic principles of ethics within the field of pediatric care and child-rearing. It demonstrates how these principles may impact outpatient and inpatient care. Special attention is also given to adolescent and end-of-life issues.
PubMed ID
11581452 View in PubMed
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Social justice and core competencies for public health: improving the fit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157381
Source
Can J Public Health. 2008 Mar-Apr;99(2):130-2
Publication Type
Article
Author
Nancy C Edwards
Colleen MacLean Davison
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing and Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON. nedwards@uottawa.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2008 Mar-Apr;99(2):130-2
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Human Rights - standards
Humans
Professional Competence
Public Health - standards
Social Class
Social Justice
Abstract
Social justice is a core value of public health. However, the public health core competencies for Canada document (release 1.0) does not contain any explicit reference to the essential attributes of social justice within the competencies themselves. We argue that social justice attributes should be integrated into the core competencies and propose examples for consideration.
PubMed ID
18457288 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.