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28 records – page 1 of 3.

Acute physiological responses in healthy men during whole-body vibration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172790
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2006 Feb;79(2):103-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Rammohan V Maikala
Sharla King
Yagesh N Bhambhani
Author Affiliation
Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety, 71 Frankland Road, Hopkinton, MA 01748, USA. rammohan.maikala@libertymutual.com
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2006 Feb;79(2):103-14
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta
Cardiac output
Cardiovascular System
Hand Strength
Human Body
Humans
Male
Occupational Exposure
Physical Fitness
Respiratory System
Spine - physiology
Vibration
Abstract
The influence of backrest support and handgrip contractions on acute metabolic, respiratory, and cardiovascular responses were evaluated in 13 healthy men during exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV).
Following assessment of aerobic fitness during arm cranking, subjects were exposed to frequencies 3, 4.5, and 6 Hz with 0.9 g(r.m.s) acceleration magnitude on a vibrating base in randomized order, on separate days. Each exposure included 6 min baseline without WBV, 8 min of WBV exposure either 'with' or 'without' backrest, 4 min recovery, followed by 8 min of WBV with opposite backrest condition, and 4 min recovery. During the final minute of WBV, subjects performed right hand maximal rhythmic handgrip contractions for one minute. During baseline and before completion of WBV session 'with' and 'without' backrest, cardiac output was estimated indirectly by carbon dioxide rebreathing.
At 3 and 4.5, and 3 and 6 Hz, absolute and relative oxygen uptake demonstrated significantly greater responses during sitting 'without' backrest than 'with' backrest (P
PubMed ID
16175416 View in PubMed
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Attitudes toward autopsy and organ donation in Sweden and the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218987
Source
JAMA. 1994 Jan 26;271(4):317
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-26-1994
Author
G D Lundberg
Source
JAMA. 1994 Jan 26;271(4):317
Date
Jan-26-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Death
Autopsy - psychology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Human Body
Humans
Internationality
Sweden
Tissue Donors - psychology
Tissue and Organ Procurement
United States
Notes
Comment On: JAMA. 1994 Jan 26;271(4):284-88295287
PubMed ID
8295294 View in PubMed
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Biotechnology and the new property regime in human bodies and body parts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185219
Source
Loyola Los Angel Int Comp Law J. 2002 Jan;24(1):19-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
Remigius N Nwabueze
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Law, University of Toronto, Canada. remy135@hotmail.com
Source
Loyola Los Angel Int Comp Law J. 2002 Jan;24(1):19-64
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biotechnology - legislation & jurisprudence
Cadaver
Canada
Human Body
Humans
Internationality
Liability, Legal
Ownership - legislation & jurisprudence - trends
Patents as Topic - legislation & jurisprudence
Tissue Donors
United States
PubMed ID
12769112 View in PubMed
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Source
Qual Health Res. 2003 Feb;13(2):256-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Juliet M Corbin
Author Affiliation
International Institute for Qualitative Research, University of Alberta, Canada.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2003 Feb;13(2):256-67
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Chronic Disease
Health
Human Body
Humans
Qualitative Research
Abstract
In this keynote address, the author discusses perception of the body in the context of chronic illness compared with that of health. She describes changes that occur in illness with respect to time, space, morality, aesthetics, morality, technology, information, and interpersonal relationships using examples from her research, and explores the construction of illness and health identities.
PubMed ID
12643032 View in PubMed
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A comparison of public attitudes toward autopsy, organ donation, and anatomic dissection. A Swedish survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73225
Source
JAMA. 1994 Jan 26;271(4):284-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-26-1994
Author
M. Sanner
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, Uppsala University, Sweden.
Source
JAMA. 1994 Jan 26;271(4):284-8
Date
Jan-26-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Death
Autopsy - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Comparative Study
Dissection - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Human Body
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortuary Practice
Religion
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Tissue Donors - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Tissue and Organ Procurement
Abstract
OBJECTIVE--To evaluate people's reactions to procedures involving the dead body by comparing their attitudes toward autopsy, organ donation, and dissection. DESIGN--Survey, using a questionnaire with 24 items that address reactions toward autopsy, organ donation, and donation of the whole body, including religious and sociodemographic issues. PARTICIPANTS--An age-stratified, random sample of 1950 individuals in Sweden, 18 to 75 years old. The response rate was 65%. RESULTS--Eighty-four percent reported acceptance of an autopsy for themselves and 80% for a close relative. Sixty-two percent were willing to donate their own organs and 39% to donate the organs of a family member; 15% accepted donation of their whole body for dissection. Practically all who accepted dissection also were willing to donate their organs and to be autopsied; practically all who were willing to donate their organs also accepted autopsy. About 65% to 70% felt some discomfort at the thought of autopsy and organ donation. Women seemed more sensitive toward operations on the dead body than men. CONCLUSIONS--The rank order of medical procedures after death, based on the proportion of individuals positive toward the procedures, can be used to form a scale with autopsy and dissection at each end point and organ donation in the middle. This scale has the characteristics of a Guttman scale and can be looked on as a comfort-discomfort continuum regarding procedures involving the dead body.
Notes
Comment In: JAMA. 1994 Jan 26;271(4):3178295294
Comment In: JAMA. 1995 Jun 28;273(24):19077783296
PubMed ID
8295287 View in PubMed
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Diverse and changing perceptions of the body: Communicating illness, health, and risk in an age of medical pluralism

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature83046
Source
J Altern Complement Med. 2005;11 Suppl 1:S67-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Agdal, R
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Anthropology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. ssara@rasmus.uib.no
Source
J Altern Complement Med. 2005;11 Suppl 1:S67-75
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Health Education - organization & administration
Health status
Holistic Health
Human Body
Humans
Needs Assessment
Professional-Patient Relations
Self Concept
Abstract
There has been a marked increase in the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in the West since the 1970s. However, biomedicine is still prevailing within public health services and health services covered by private insurance. Different therapies, conventional and CAM, represent different perceptions of the the body. Perceptions of the body are closely related to perceptions of illness, health, disease, and risk. The cultural models of the body are related to social organization and the development of technologies. In a study on spiritual healers and their clients in Norway, I found that clients adapted to a multitude of medical regimes by processes of recognition through cognitive models, learning, and socialization. I describe five models that are evident in communication between healers and clients; the model of the body as machine, plumbing system, energetic, programmable, and as wireless network. People hold diverse perceptions of health, illness, body, and risk, which influence attitudes and behavior. Changes in perceptions of body, health, and illness may be one factor enforcing that CAM is increasingly becoming a first-line intervention. Health authorities meet this challenge emphasizing the regulation of CAM to safeguard patients but could also choose to focus on what clients define as their needs. The shift in cultural understandings of the body, and how people cope with this diversity, ought to be an area for further investigation, as it may affect the choices citizens make and the legitimacy of health authorities.
PubMed ID
16332189 View in PubMed
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Ethical and intellectual property in the biological sciences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208549
Source
Cell Mol Biol (Noisy-le-grand). 1997 May;43(3):263-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1997
Author
E A Maher
Author Affiliation
Canadian Intellectual Property Office, Hull, Québec, Canada.
Source
Cell Mol Biol (Noisy-le-grand). 1997 May;43(3):263-7
Date
May-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bioethics
Biology
Canada
Disclosure
Europe
Genes
Human Body
Humans
Information Dissemination
Intellectual property
Patents as Topic - legislation & jurisprudence
Risk assessment
United States
Abstract
Ethical concerns on patents in the biological sciences are increased by the prospect of patents for higher life forms. A Canadian patent grants the owner the right to exclude others in Canada from making, using, or selling or offering for sale his or her invention for the term of the patent; however, it does not give the patent owner any positive rights to do likewise. As with other forms of property, the right to make, use, or sell a patented invention may be regulated by other laws or guidelines. In Canada, higher life forms, medical and surgical methods are not patentable subject matter. Unicellular life forms and subcellular material are considered patentable. Decisions on ethical issues are not considered by patent officers. The Patent Office is guided only by legislation. Other regulations by the legislatures can direct public policy and minimize risks.
PubMed ID
9193780 View in PubMed
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Ethical considerations in living organ donation and a new approach. An Advance-Directive Organ Registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223447
Source
Arch Intern Med. 1992 Jul;152(7):1484-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1992
Author
I. Kleinman
F H Lowy
Author Affiliation
Centre for Bioethics, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Arch Intern Med. 1992 Jul;152(7):1484-8
Date
Jul-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advance Directives
Beneficence
Canada
Disclosure
Ethics, Medical
Human Body
Humans
Informed consent
Internationality
Patient Selection
Personal Autonomy
Registries
Resource Allocation
Risk assessment
Social Justice
Tissue Donors - supply & distribution
Tissue and Organ Procurement
Abstract
Living organ donation should be recognized as an ethical compromise to the principle of nonmaleficence (doing no harm), given the risks healthy donors are allowed to assume. Living organ donation should be reserved for situations in which there is no acceptable alternative. Increasing the availability of cadaveric organs is most desirable, since it would decrease (although probably not eliminate) the need for living organ transplantation and would provide organs (ie, hearts) that could not otherwise be obtained. We propose the development of an incentive-based Advance-Directive Organ Registry, in which all adults are encouraged to register their advance directive regarding organ donations. Those individuals agreeing to permit usable organs to be taken at the time of death would receive priority for organs generated by the program, should a transplant become necessary when there is a shortage of organs. The proposed Advance-Directive Organ Registry is firmly founded on the principles of autonomy, beneficence, and justice.
Notes
Comment In: Arch Intern Med. 1993 Feb 22;153(4):529-308435032
PubMed ID
1627029 View in PubMed
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28 records – page 1 of 3.