Skip header and navigation

Refine By

10 records – page 1 of 1.

Source
CMAJ. 1999 Jan 12;160(1):23, 25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-12-1999
Author
S M Alibhai
Source
CMAJ. 1999 Jan 12;160(1):23, 25
Date
Jan-12-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Decision Making
Ethics, Institutional
Freedom
Housing for the Elderly - standards
Humans
Licensure
Quebec
Notes
Comment On: CMAJ. 1998 Jul 28;159(2):143-89700325
Comment On: CMAJ. 1998 Jul 28;159(2):151-29700327
PubMed ID
9934337 View in PubMed
Less detail

Contextualizing and assessing the social capital of seniors in congregate housing residences: study design and methods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175213
Source
BMC Public Health. 2005 Apr 18;5:38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-18-2005
Author
Spencer Moore
Alan Shiell
Valerie Haines
Therese Riley
Carrie Collier
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health & Policy Studies, Dept. of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, 3330 Hospital Dr. NW, Calgary, AB T2N 4T1, Canada. moos@ucalgary.ca
Source
BMC Public Health. 2005 Apr 18;5:38
Date
Apr-18-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta
Community Networks
Female
Focus Groups
Housing for the Elderly - standards
Humans
Income
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Pilot Projects
Poverty
Psychometrics - methods
Questionnaires
Research Design
Social Class
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
This article discusses the study design and methods used to contextualize and assess the social capital of seniors living in congregate housing residences in Calgary, Alberta. The project is being funded as a pilot project under the Institute of Aging, Canadian Institutes for Health Research.
Working with seniors living in 5 congregate housing residencies in Calgary, the project uses a mixed method approach to develop grounded measures of the social capital of seniors. The project integrates both qualitative and quantitative methods in a 3-phase research design: 1) qualitative, 2) quantitative, and 3) qualitative. Phase 1 uses gender-specific focus groups; phase 2 involves the administration of individual surveys that include a social network module; and phase 3 uses anamolous-case interviews. Not only does the study design allow us to develop grounded measures of social capital but it also permits us to test how well the three methods work separately, and how well they fit together to achieve project goals. This article describes the selection of the study population, the multiple methods used in the research and a brief discussion of our conceptualization and measurement of social capital.
Notes
Cites: Milbank Q. 2001;79(3):387-427, IV11565162
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2002 Jul;55(1):125-3912137182
Cites: Int J Health Serv. 2002;32(3):423-3212211285
Cites: J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 1997 Nov;52(6):P284-939403517
Cites: J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 1997 Sep;52(5):P197-2059310088
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1997 Sep;87(9):1491-89314802
Cites: Ann Epidemiol. 1993 Jul;3(4):325-358275207
PubMed ID
15836784 View in PubMed
Less detail

Decreasing influenza impact in lodges: 1997-2000 Calgary Regional Health Authority.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190535
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 Jul-Aug;92(4):291-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
L. McLeod
W W Lau
Author Affiliation
Calgary Regional Health Authority, Calgary, AB.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 Jul-Aug;92(4):291-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alberta - epidemiology
Amantadine - therapeutic use
Antiviral agents - therapeutic use
Cross Infection - prevention & control
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Health Services Research
Hospitalization - trends
Housing for the Elderly - standards
Humans
Influenza, Human - drug therapy - epidemiology - prevention & control
Long-Term Care - organization & administration - standards
Population Surveillance
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Premedication
Abstract
Influenza causes high morbidity and hospitalization rates in residents of seniors lodges, I causing increased pressure on emergency departments and hospital beds every winter. This quasi-experimental study assessed the prevention of influenza outbreaks and their consequences in Calgary lodges. A multidisciplinary team worked to improve communication between health professionals, increase resident and staff immunization coverage, obtain weights and creatinines prior to influenza season, and facilitate amantadine prophylaxis during influenza A outbreaks. We had an increase in standing orders for amantadine and up to 56% of residents from one lodge had documented creatinine levels. Amantadine was administered to residents within two days of outbreak notification. Influenza morbidity in lodge outbreaks decreased from a rate of 37% to 9% over the three years and hospitalization rates decreased from 9% to 1%. We recommend that other regions consider a similar approach to decreasing influenza morbidity and hospitalization in lodge residents.
PubMed ID
11962115 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Housing adapted to the needs of patients with dementia. Medical competence is necessary during planning].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223585
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Jun 17;89(25):2285-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-17-1992

Housing conditions of elderly people in a city. The Albertina Project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73173
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1994 Jun;12(2):137-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1994
Author
A M Lindgren
K. Svärdsudd
G. Tibblin
Author Affiliation
Uppsala University, Department of Family Medicine, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1994 Jun;12(2):137-43
Date
Jun-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Health status
Housing for the Elderly - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Pilot Projects
Public Opinion
Quality of Life
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rural Population
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Urban Population
Abstract
OBJECTIVE--To study housing conditions of elderly people in Uppsala, Sweden. DESIGN--The Albertina Project is an epidemiological study. A postal questionnaire was sent to a random sample. SETTING AND SUBJECTS--The general population 75 years or older in the community of Uppsala, 1985. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Information on marital status, housing conditions, housing standard, problems with the apartment/house, desires for modifications to the apartment, wishes to stay or to move related to the possibility to prevent institutionalization because of bad housing standard. RESULTS--About half of those who participated in the study were single (never married, divorced or widowed). 85% lived in their own homes, 10% in so-called service apartments, and only 5% in institutions. More than 90% had a good housing standard. 45% reported some form of housing problem, but only 14% wanted modifications to their dwelling, and only 8% wanted to move from their present dwelling, in most cases due to problems with stairs or need for more help. CONCLUSION--Most people lived in their own home and wanted to stay there. The housing standard appeared to be satisfactory in the majority of cases but minor modifications might prevent "unnecessary" moves to institutions.
PubMed ID
7973192 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1992 Jun;39(3):238-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1992
Author
H. Christoffersen
Author Affiliation
Amternes og Kommunernes Forskningsinstitut, København.
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1992 Jun;39(3):238-41
Date
Jun-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged - psychology
Attitude
Denmark
Forecasting
Housing for the Elderly - standards - trends
Humans
Public Policy
Abstract
The housing conditions of the elderly in Denmark are undergoing rapid improvement. The main reason for this is that the first generations to benefit from the growth of prosperity that started in the 1950s are now joining the ranks of the elderly. Similarly, the oldest of the elderly population--many of whom live in some of the country's oldest, smallest and technically worst housing--are now dying off. Most of the new elderly generation own their own home, usually a detached house, and the vast majority of them must be expected to be extremely satisfied with their homes and to want to remain in them in their old age. However, this may present difficulties, partly because it requires a certain income and partly because the dwellings require quite a lot of maintenance, gardening, street-cleaning, etc. The general rule seems to be that the elderly mainly only move from a good, big home when they lose their husband or wife or reach a point at which they need more care. Danish policy on housing for the elderly attaches importance to supporting the elderly in their own homes, and the available resources are largely concentrated on this intention. Here at the beginning of the 1990s this policy has run into difficulties because it has led to the allocation of resources being slanted in favour of relatively well-situated elderly people, while the weakest and poorest old people with the biggest need for care are not served satisfactorily.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
1638887 View in PubMed
Less detail

Integration of lucid individuals and agitated individuals with dementia in different care units.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71765
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2001 Nov;10(6):730-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
Author
H. Ragneskog
L A Gerdner
L. Hellström
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry, Göteborg University, Sweden. hans.ragneskog@fhs.gu.se
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2001 Nov;10(6):730-6
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety - etiology - psychology
Dementia - nursing - psychology
Fear
Female
Health Services Research
Hospital Units - standards
Housing for the Elderly - standards
Humans
Inpatients - psychology
Interpersonal Relations
Irritable Mood
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Nursing Homes - standards
Patient satisfaction
Patients' Rooms - standards
Peer Group
Psychomotor Agitation - psychology
Quality of Health Care
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to illuminate how the integration of lucid individuals and agitated cognitively impaired individuals affects aspects of perceived quality of care. A questionnaire was mailed to hospital wards, nursing home wards and residential homes in Sweden. Nursing staff replied to the questionnaire on behalf of each care unit. Integration of cognitively impaired and lucid patients/residents was identified as a problem, regardless of whether the care unit was a hospital ward, nursing home or residential home. Agitated behaviours in people who were cognitively impaired could result in lucid residents becoming anxious, afraid and irritated. This in turn could lead to an exacerbation of behaviour in residents who were already agitated. Sometimes a lucid patient/resident was required to share a room with an agitated individual. There is a need for staff training specific to the needs of people with dementia. Findings suggest that there is a shortage of units designed specifically for the care of agitated cognitively impaired patients/residents. The findings of this study support the need for healthcare providers in long-term care settings to maintain the rights and well being of all patients/residents.
PubMed ID
11822844 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Moving the elderly may be a success].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214122
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Oct 4;92(40):3662
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-4-1995
Author
K. Vang
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Oct 4;92(40):3662
Date
Oct-4-1995
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Homes for the Aged - standards
Housing for the Elderly - standards
Humans
Nursing Homes - standards
Patient transfer
Sweden
Notes
Comment On: Lakartidningen. 1995 May 10;92(19):2025-77752747
PubMed ID
7564611 View in PubMed
Less detail

Physical Limitations, Walkability, Perceived Environmental Facilitators and Physical Activity of Older Adults in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286530
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 Mar 22;14(3)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-22-2017
Author
Erja Portegijs
Kirsi E Keskinen
Li-Tang Tsai
Taina Rantanen
Merja Rantakokko
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 Mar 22;14(3)
Date
Mar-22-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Architectural Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environment Design
Exercise
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Geriatric Assessment
Health promotion
Housing for the Elderly - standards
Humans
Male
Mobility Limitation
Quality of Life
Residence Characteristics
Socioeconomic Factors
Walking
Abstract
The aim was to study objectively assessed walkability of the environment and participant perceived environmental facilitators for outdoor mobility as predictors of physical activity in older adults with and without physical limitations. 75-90-year-old adults living independently in Central Finland were interviewed (n = 839) and reassessed for self-reported physical activity one or two years later (n = 787). Lower-extremity physical limitations were defined as Short Physical Performance Battery score =9. Number of perceived environmental facilitators was calculated from a 16-item checklist. Walkability index (land use mix, street connectivity, population density) of the home environment was calculated from geographic information and categorized into tertiles. Accelerometer-based step counts were registered for one week (n = 174). Better walkability was associated with higher numbers of perceived environmental facilitators (p
Notes
Cites: Am J Phys Med Rehabil. 2014 Oct;93(10):876-8324800719
Cites: J Aging Res. 2012;2012:62575822162808
Cites: Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2015 Aug;25(4):e368-7326152855
Cites: Int J Health Geogr. 2014 Mar 04;13:724588848
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2007 Nov;65(9):1898-91417644231
Cites: J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2016 Aug;71(8):1039-4826957472
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2013 May 14;10:5723672435
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 1999 Feb;80(2):130-510025485
Cites: Health Place. 2011 Mar;17(2):458-6921257333
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2004 Aug;27(2):87-9615261894
Cites: J Urban Health. 2015 Apr;92(2):242-5225539783
Cites: Health Place. 2014 May;27:127-3324603010
Cites: Int J Health Geogr. 2012 Jun 27;11:2222738807
Cites: J Aging Health. 2015 Jun;27(4):606-2125326130
Cites: Ann Behav Med. 2009 Apr;37(2):228-3819396503
Cites: Lancet. 2012 Jul 21;380(9838):247-5722818937
Cites: Health Place. 2014 Jan;25:43-624239702
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2012 Nov 22;12:101823170987
Cites: Health Place. 2016 Jul;40:116-2227261634
Cites: PLoS One. 2015 Aug 07;10(8):e013530826252537
Cites: J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2017 Jan 19;:null28329074
Cites: Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2016 Oct 17;:null27747944
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2012 Apr 03;9:4022472295
Cites: Clin Rehabil. 2009 Jun;23(6):558-6719403554
Cites: J Gerontol. 1994 Mar;49(2):M85-948126356
Cites: Qual Life Res. 2016 May;25(5):1189-9726407605
Cites: J Urban Health. 2010 Sep;87(5):782-9520814757
Cites: Int J Health Geogr. 2014 Oct 25;13:4325343966
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2003 Mar;51(3):393-812588584
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2014 Oct 15;180(8):799-80925234431
Cites: Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2017 Mar - Apr;69:69-7627889590
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2016 Jan;149:104-1326708246
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2013 Jun;44(6):e51-523683990
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2011 Apr;72(8):1266-7321470735
Cites: Int J Aging Hum Dev. 2008;66(2):131-5418453180
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2014 Apr;62(4):615-2124655124
Cites: Prev Med. 2015 Dec;81:163-726348450
Cites: Br J Sports Med. 2010 Oct;44(13):924-3319406732
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2013 Jan;77:20-3023206559
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2015 Aug 11;15:76826260474
Cites: J Gerontol B Psychol Sci Soc Sci. 2012 Jan;67(1):76-8822227735
PubMed ID
28327543 View in PubMed
Less detail

Quality of care in unlicensed homes for the aged in the eastern townships of Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201937
Source
CMAJ. 1999 May 18;160(10):1441-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-18-1999
Author
G. Bravo
M F Dubois
M. Charpentier
P. De Wals
A. Emond
Author Affiliation
Département des sciences de la santé communautaire, Faculté de médecine, Université de Sherbrooke, Que. gbravo@courrier.usherb.ca
Source
CMAJ. 1999 May 18;160(10):1441-5
Date
May-18-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Housing for the Elderly - standards
Humans
Licensure
Nursing Homes - standards
Process Assessment (Health Care)
Quality of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Quebec
Abstract
The recent proliferation of unlicensed homes for the aged in Quebec, coupled with the increased needs of the population they serve, has raised concerns about the quality of case these homes provide. The authors compared the quality of care in unlicensed homes with that in licensed long-term care facilities in a region of Quebec.
The study involved 301 impaired people aged 65 and over in 88 residential care facilities (52 unlicensed, 36 licensed) in the Eastern Townships of Quebec. Study participants were chosen according to a 2-stage sampling scheme: stratified sampling of the primary units (facilities) and random sampling of the secondary units (residents). Quality of care was measured using the QUALCARE scale, a multidimensional instrument that uses a 5-point scale to assess 6 dimensions of care: environmental, physical, medical management, psychosocial, human rights and financial. A mean score of more than 2 was considered indicative of inadequate care.
Overall, the quality of care was similar in the unlicensed and licensed facilities (mean global score 1.61 [standard error of the mean (SEM) 0.06] and 1.47 [SEM 0.09] respectively). Examination of dimension-specific quality-of-care scores revealed that the unlicensed homes performed worse than the licensed facilities in 2 areas of care: physical care (mean score 1.80 [SEM 0.08] v. 1.51 [SEM 0.09] respectively, p = 0.017) and medical management (1.37 [SEM 0.06] v. 1.14 [SEM 0.05], p = 0.004). The dimension-specific scores also revealed that both types of homes lacked appropriate attention to the psychosocial aspect of care. Overall, 25% of the facilities provided inadequate care to at least one resident. This situation was especially prevalent among homes with fewer than 40 residents, where up to 20% of the residents received inadequate care.
Most of the unlicensed homes for the aged that were studied delivered care of relatively good quality. However, some clearly provided inadequate care.
Notes
Cites: Med Care Rev. 1991 Summer;48(2):129-6610112152
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1997 Aug;45(8):994-10019256854
Cites: J Aging Health. 1991 Nov;3(4):427-5410115033
Cites: Aust J Public Health. 1992 Mar;16(1):89-971627720
Cites: J Health Soc Behav. 1993 Dec;34(4):336-458034950
Cites: Stat Methods Med Res. 1995 Mar;4(1):73-897613639
Cites: J Gerontol Nurs. 1996 Aug;22(8):36-458826283
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1997 Aug;45(8):977-859256852
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1997 Aug;45(8):986-939256853
Cites: Gerontologist. 1991 Jun;31(3):302-81879706
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1997 Aug;45(8):1002-109256855
Cites: Gerontologist. 1997 Aug;37(4):469-749279035
Cites: CMAJ. 1997 Oct 15;157(8):1025-329347773
Cites: CMAJ. 1998 Jul 28;159(2):143-89700325
Cites: Curationis. 1990 Jun-Jul;13(1-2):21-32225243
Cites: Int J Nurs Stud. 1990;27(1):77-912312237
Cites: Int J Nurs Stud. 1990;27(1):61-752312236
Cites: Health Serv Res. 1989 Apr;24(1):105-272654084
Cites: Clin Geriatr Med. 1988 Aug;4(3):655-663044561
Comment In: CMAJ. 1999 May 18;160(10):1463-410352636
PubMed ID
10352633 View in PubMed
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.