Skip header and navigation

Refine By

84 records – page 1 of 9.

The 3-year follow-up study in a block of flats - experiences in the use of the Finnish indoor climate classification.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185305
Source
Indoor Air. 2003 Jun;13(2):136-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
M. Tuomainen
A. Tuomainen
J. Liesivuori
A-L Pasanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Kuopio, Finland. marja.tuomainen@hengitysliitto.fi
Source
Indoor Air. 2003 Jun;13(2):136-47
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air pollution, indoor
Allergens - analysis
Ammonia - analysis
Asthma - prevention & control
Bacteria
Carbon Dioxide - analysis
Carbon Monoxide - analysis
Construction Materials - standards
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Housing - standards
Humans
Humidity
Questionnaires
Spores, Fungal
Temperature
Abstract
Indoor climate of two new blocks of flats was investigated. The case building was built for people with respiratory diseases by following the instructions of the Finnish Classification of Indoor Climate, Construction and Finishing Materials, while the control building was built using conventional building technology. The main indoor air parameters (temperature, relative humidity and levels of CO, CO2, ammonia, total volatile organic compounds, total suspended particles, fungal spores, bacteria and cat, dog and house dust mite allergens) were measured in six apartments of both the buildings on five occasions during the 3-year occupancy. In addition, a questionnaire to evaluate symptoms of the occupants and their satisfaction with their home environment was conducted in connection with indoor air quality (IAQ) measurements. The levels of indoor air pollutants in the case building were, in general, lower than those in the control building. In addition, the asthmatic occupants informed that their symptoms had decreased during the occupancy in the case building. This case study showed that high IAQ is possible to reach by careful design, proper materials and equipment and on high-quality construction with reasonable additional costs. In addition, the study indicated that good IAQ can also be maintained during the occupancy, if sufficient information on factors affecting IAQ and guidance on proper use and care of equipment are available for occupants.
PubMed ID
12756007 View in PubMed
Less detail

Application of the Environmental Relative Moldiness Index in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277039
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 2015 Nov 06;82(2):578-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-06-2015
Author
Martin Täubel
Anne M Karvonen
Tiina Reponen
Anne Hyvärinen
Stephen Vesper
Juha Pekkanen
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 2015 Nov 06;82(2):578-84
Date
Nov-06-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Dust - analysis
Environmental monitoring
Finland
Fungi - genetics - growth & development - isolation & purification
Housing - standards
Odors - analysis
Abstract
The environmental relative moldiness index (ERMI) metric was previously developed to quantify mold contamination in U.S. homes. This study determined the applicability of the ERMI for quantifying mold and moisture damage in Finnish residences. Homes of the LUKAS2 birth cohort in Finland were visually inspected for moisture damage and mold, and vacuumed floor dust samples were collected. An ERMI analysis including 36 mold-specific quantitative PCR assays was performed on the dust samples (n = 144), and the ERMI metric was analyzed against inspection-based observations of moisture damage and mold. Our results show that the ERMI was significantly associated with certain observations of visible mold in Finnish homes but not with moisture damage. Several mold species occurred more frequently and at higher levels in Finnish than in U.S. homes. Modification of the ERMI toward Finnish conditions, using a subsample of LUKAS2 homes with and without moisture damage, resulted in a simplified metric based on 10 mold species. The Finnish ERMI (FERMI) performed substantially better in quantifying moisture and mold damage in Finnish homes, showing significant associations with various observations of visible mold, strongest when the damage was located in the child's main living area, as well as with mold odor and moisture damage. As shown in Finland, the ERMI as such is not equally well usable in different climates and geographic regions but may be remodeled to account for local outdoor and indoor fungal conditions as well as for moisture damage characteristics in a given country.
Notes
Cites: Syst Appl Microbiol. 2004 Mar;27(2):198-21015046309
Cites: J Occup Environ Med. 2004 Jun;46(6):596-60115213523
Cites: Indoor Air. 2005;15 Suppl 9:58-6415910530
Cites: Nat Rev Microbiol. 2006 Feb;4(2):102-1216415926
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2007 Mar;29(3):509-1517107993
Cites: J Occup Environ Med. 2007 Aug;49(8):829-3317693779
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2008 May 1;394(1):192-618280542
Cites: Pediatrics. 2009 Aug;124(2):e329-3819651571
Cites: J Urban Health. 2009 Nov;86(6):850-6019536652
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2010 Aug 3;107(31):13748-5320616017
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2011 Jun;119(6):748-5621269928
Cites: Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2011 Aug;107(2):120-621802019
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2012 Nov 1;438:319-2423022719
Cites: Indoor Air. 2012 Dec;22(6):457-6622404345
Cites: Environ Res. 2013 Apr;122:98-10123419817
Cites: Allergy. 2014 Aug;69(8):1092-10124931137
Cites: Pediatrics. 2015 Mar;135(3):e598-60625687143
Cites: Trop Biomed. 2014 Dec;31(4):663-925776591
Cites: Clin Exp Allergy. 2015 May;45(5):902-725580663
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2015 May 5;112(18):5756-6125902536
Cites: BMC Pulm Med. 2015;15:4825929252
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 2014 Oct;71(10):704-1225035116
Cites: J Occup Environ Hyg. 2015;12(1):29-3625068535
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2015 Jan;123(1):6-2025303775
PubMed ID
26546428 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessment of activities of daily living in the elderly. A study of a population of 76-year-olds in Gothenburg, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73692
Source
Scand J Rehabil Med. 1991;23(4):193-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
U. Sonn
K H Asberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Gothenburg University, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Rehabil Med. 1991;23(4):193-202
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Classification
Evaluation Studies
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Housing - standards
Humans
Male
Nursing Homes - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Assessment (Psychology)
World Health Organization
Abstract
The cumulative structure of personal daily activities (Katz' Index of ADL) and four well-defined instrumental activities (cooking, transportation, shopping, and cleaning) have been studied in a population of 76-year-olds (N = 659) in Gothenburg, Sweden. Sixty-five percent of the population were independent, 22% were dependent in instrumental activities, and 13% were dependent in both instrumental and personal activities. No person was dependent in personal ADL and independent in instrumental ADL. The internal consistency and the coefficient of scalability were well above the acceptance level, which indicated an internal reliability and validity of the new scale. The frequency of personal and home-assistance care, type of accommodation, self-assessment of self-care and domestic activities were compared with the level of dependence in ADL and indicated external validity. This cumulative instrument of ADL can be used to describe and compare the level of disability in elderly populations and to define the need for personal assistance in home care among disabled persons.
PubMed ID
1785028 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessment of indoor environmental quality in existing multi-family buildings in North-East Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268743
Source
Environ Int. 2015 Jun;79:74-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Liuliu Du
Tadas Prasauskas
Virpi Leivo
Mari Turunen
Maria Pekkonen
Mihkel Kiviste
Anu Aaltonen
Dainius Martuzevicius
Ulla Haverinen-Shaughnessy
Source
Environ Int. 2015 Jun;79:74-84
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Air Pollution, Indoor - analysis
Carbon Dioxide - analysis
Carbon Monoxide - analysis
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Finland
Formaldehyde - analysis
Housing - standards
Humans
Lithuania
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis
Particulate Matter - analysis
Ventilation - standards
Volatile Organic Compounds - analysis
Abstract
Sixteen existing multi-family buildings (94 apartments) in Finland and 20 (96 apartments) in Lithuania were investigated prior to their renovation in order to develop and test out a common protocol for the indoor environmental quality (IEQ) assessment, and to assess the potential for improving IEQ along with energy efficiency. Baseline data on buildings, as well as data on temperature (T), relative humidity (RH), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), particulate matter (PM), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), formaldehyde, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), radon, and microbial content in settled dust were collected from each apartment. In addition, questionnaire data regarding housing quality and health were collected from the occupants. The results indicated that most measured IEQ parameters were within recommended limits. However, different baselines in each country were observed especially for parameters related to thermal conditions and ventilation. Different baselines were also observed for the respondents' satisfaction with their residence and indoor air quality, as well as their behavior related to indoor environment. In this paper, we present some evidence for the potential in improving IEQ along with energy efficiency in the current building stock, followed by discussion of possible IEQ indicators and development of the assessment protocol.
PubMed ID
25797585 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association of housing density, isolation and tuberculosis in Canadian First Nations communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6436
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2002 Oct;31(5):940-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2002
Author
Michael Clark
Peter Riben
Earl Nowgesic
Author Affiliation
First Nations and Inuit Health Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Michael_Clark@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2002 Oct;31(5):940-5
Date
Oct-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Health Services Accessibility
Housing - standards
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Multivariate Analysis
Population Density
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: First Nations communities in Canada experience disproportionately high levels of overcrowded housing, degree of isolation, and rates of tuberculosis (TB). A study was done to assess the association between housing density, isolation, and the occurrence of TB in First Nations communities. METHODS: Average persons per room (ppr), isolation type, average household income, population, and TB cases (1997-1999) at the community level were entered into a database. Tuberculosis notification rates and 95% CI were calculated for different strata of ppr and isolation. Two multiple logistic regression models were developed to examine the association of ppr, isolation, income, and population with the occurrence of >/=1, or >/=2, TB cases in a community. RESULTS: The rate was 18.9 per 100,000 (95% CI: 13.3-24.6) in communities with an average of 0.4-0.6 ppr, while communities with 1.0-1.2 ppr had a rate of 113.0 per 100,000 (95% CI: 95.4-130.5). An increase of 0.1 ppr in a community was associated with a 40% increase in risk of >/=2 TB cases occurring, while an increase of $10,000 in community household income was associated with 0.25 the risk, and being an isolated community increased risk by 2.5 times. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows a significant association between housing density, isolation, income levels, and TB. Overcrowded housing has the potential to increase exposure of susceptible individuals to infectious TB cases, and isolation from health services may increase the likelihood of TB.
PubMed ID
12435764 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bed bug infestations in an urban environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175260
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2005 Apr;11(4):533-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Stephen W Hwang
Tomislav J Svoboda
Iain J De Jong
Karl J Kabasele
Evie Gogosis
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research on Inner City Health, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. hwangs@smh.toronto.on.ca
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2005 Apr;11(4):533-8
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bedbugs
Housing - standards
Humans
Insect Control - methods
Ontario
Public Health - standards
Urban health
Abstract
Until recently, bed bugs have been considered uncommon in the industrialized world. This study determined the extent of reemerging bed bug infestations in homeless shelters and other locations in Toronto, Canada. Toronto Public Health documented complaints of bed bug infestations from 46 locations in 2003, most commonly apartments (63%), shelters (15%), and rooming houses (11%). Pest control operators in Toronto (N = 34) reported treating bed bug infestations at 847 locations in 2003, most commonly single-family dwellings (70%), apartments (18%), and shelters (8%). Bed bug infestations were reported at 20 (31%) of 65 homeless shelters. At 1 affected shelter, 4% of residents reported having bed bug bites. Bed bug infestations can have an adverse effect on health and quality of life in the general population, particularly among homeless persons living in shelters.
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 1994 Mar 26;343(8900):761-37907732
Cites: S Afr Med J. 1991 Mar 16;79(6):320-22017742
Cites: Clin Exp Dermatol. 1999 May;24(3):241-210354190
Cites: BMJ. 2000 Apr 22;320(7242):114110775230
Cites: Cutis. 2000 May;65(5):262-410826083
Cites: Am J Gastroenterol. 2001 Jul;96(7):2194-811467652
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2002 Aug 15;347(7):505-1612181406
Cites: West Afr J Med. 2002 Oct-Dec;21(4):268-7112665260
Cites: S Afr Med J. 1978 Apr 15;53(15):598-600675426
Cites: S Afr Med J. 1979 Jul 14;56(2):54-7573506
Cites: S Afr Med J. 1983 Jan 15;63(3):77-816849170
Cites: Lancet. 1986 Jul 5;2(8497):452873343
Cites: Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg. 1986;80(4):653-83810799
Cites: AIDS. 1987 Sep;1(3):171-42450552
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1989 Dec;160(6):970-72479697
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1999 Jan 21;340(3):184-99895398
PubMed ID
15829190 View in PubMed
Less detail

Centralised or decentralised sanitation in Swedish summerhouse areas in transition to permanent living?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94022
Source
Water Sci Technol. 2007;56(5):157-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Kärrman E.
Erlandsson A.
Hellström D.
Björlenius B.
Tidåker P.
Author Affiliation
Ecoloop AB, Brännkyrkagatan 35, Stockholm, SE-118 22, Stockholm, Sweden. erik.karrman@ecoloop.se
Source
Water Sci Technol. 2007;56(5):157-64
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Computer simulation
Conservation of Natural Resources
Decision Support Techniques
Filtration
Housing - standards
Sweden
Toilet Facilities - standards
Waste Disposal, Fluid - methods
Water Purification - methods
Abstract
The standard of wastewater management is high in Sweden. Around 90% of the population is connected to central wastewater treatment plants with high requirements of nutrients removal; however, still the problem with algae blooms in the Baltic Sea exists. The aim of the VeVa project was to develop a simple and user-friendly Excel-based model to support environmental decisions of how to select wastewater systems for housing areas where no central sewer system exists. The VeVa model deals with two types of environmental issues: substance flow analysis and energy analysis. Six system structures were studied for the transition area Lillängsdal in Värmdö municipality sorted in three categories: 1) on-site systems for single households; 2) local collective systems; 3) connection to central systems. All studied system structures, except for a Sand filter system, fulfilled the goals of reducing phosphorus and BOD7 according to Swedish guidelines for on-site systems in sensitive areas. All studied systems, except for the Sand filter system, have the potential to fulfil the Swedish National Environmental goal to recycle 60% phosphorus to productive land. The systems with central wastewater treatment plant and local wastewater treatment are the most energy efficient alternatives that also fulfil the requirements of discharges and environmental goals regarding phosphorus recycling.
PubMed ID
17881849 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changes in accessibility and usability in housing: an exploration of the housing adaptation process.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174266
Source
Occup Ther Int. 2005;12(1):44-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Agneta Fänge
Susanne Iwarsson
Author Affiliation
Division of Occupationanl Therapy, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. aaf@arb.lu.se
Source
Occup Ther Int. 2005;12(1):44-59
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Data Collection
Disabled Persons
Environment Design
Facility Design and Construction
Female
Housing - standards
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational therapy
Self-Help Devices
Sweden
Abstract
The purpose of a housing adaptation is to enhance daily activities and to improve housing accessibility and usability by removing physical barriers in the home. The aim of this study was to investigate longitudinal changes in housing accessibility among clients receiving grants for housing adaptations. Baseline assessments were administered one month before the housing adaptation, with the first follow-up after two to three months, and the second follow-up after eight to nine months. The Housing Enabler and the Usability in My Home instruments were used to collect data from 131 consecutively enrolled clients living in general housing. Accessibility and usability improved significantly, the number of physical environmental barriers decreased and dependence on mobility devices increased, but at different times along the process. The results indicate the complexity of the housing adaptation process and the need to consider person-environment interactions over time. The methodology seems useful for quality development of assessment, intervention and evaluation processes in housing adaptations performed by occupational therapists.
PubMed ID
15962699 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Children hospitalized because of poor housing]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature42955
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1974 Jul 24;74(29):9-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-24-1974
Author
M. Gundelach-Taabel
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1974 Jul 24;74(29):9-10
Date
Jul-24-1974
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Hospitalized
Greenland
Hospitals
Housing - standards
Humans
Morbidity
Pediatric Nursing
PubMed ID
4498391 View in PubMed
Less detail

Community profiles/Indian housing in Yukon Territory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49370
Source
Pages 149-154 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
  1 document  
Author
Lawrence, R.
Walker, F.G.
Author Affiliation
Environmental Health Division, Yukon Region Medical Services Branch, Health & Welfare Canada, Whitehorse, Yukon Territory, Canada
Source
Pages 149-154 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Date
1988
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Cold Climate
Environmental health - trends
Housing - standards
Humans
Indians, North American
Social Environment
Yukon Territory
PubMed ID
3272597 View in PubMed
Documents
Less detail

84 records – page 1 of 9.