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Adequacy of food spending is related to housing expenditures among lower-income Canadian households.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161594
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Dec;10(12):1464-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Sharon I Kirkpatrick
Valerie Tarasuk
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, FitzGerald Building Room 326, 150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5S 3E2.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2007 Dec;10(12):1464-73
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Budgets
Canada
Costs and Cost Analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Food - economics
Food Supply - economics - statistics & numerical data
Housing - economics
Humans
Income
Nutrition Surveys
Poverty
Abstract
A number of studies have pointed to the pressure that housing costs can exert on the resources available for food. The objectives of the present study were to characterise the relationship between the proportion of income absorbed by housing and the adequacy of household food expenditures across the Canadian population and within income quintiles; and to elucidate the impact of receipt of a housing subsidy on adequacy of food expenditures among low-income tenant households.
The 2001 Survey of Household Spending, conducted by Statistics Canada, was a national cross-sectional survey that collected detailed information on expenditures on goods and services. The adequacy of food spending was assessed in relation to the cost of a basic nutritious diet.
Canada.
The person with primary responsibility for financial maintenance from 15 535 households from all provinces and territories.
As the proportion of income allocated to housing increased, food spending adequacy declined significantly among households in the three lowest income quintiles. After accounting for household income and composition, receipt of a housing subsidy was associated with an improvement in adequacy of food spending among low-income tenant households, but still mean food spending fell below the cost of a basic nutritious diet even among subsidised households.
This study indicates that housing costs compromise the food access of some low-income households and speaks to the need to re-examine policies related to housing affordability and income adequacy.
PubMed ID
17764603 View in PubMed
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Cost-of-illness studies of dementia: a systematic review focusing on stage dependency of costs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149025
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 Apr;121(4):243-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
W. Quentin
S G Riedel-Heller
M. Luppa
A. Rudolph
H-H König
Author Affiliation
Health Economics Research Unit, Department of Psychiatry, University of Leipzig, Liebigstrasse 26, Leipzig, Germany.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 Apr;121(4):243-59
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cost of Illness
Delivery of Health Care - economics
Dementia - economics - psychology
Europe
Health Care Costs
Housing - economics
Humans
Severity of Illness Index
United States
Abstract
To review cost-of-illness (COI) studies of dementia from Europe and North America which report costs per patient by disease stage.
A systematic literature search was performed in electronic databases. Studies were classified according to important determinants of costs. Results were converted into year 2006 USD-PPP, and summarized as costs for formal and informal care in mild, moderate and severe dementia.
28 studies were evaluated. They used a wide range of methods. Costs more than doubled from mild to severe dementia. Patterns and size of estimated costs depended primarily on study objectives (estimation of total costs-net costs), living arrangements of patients (community-dwelling-institutionalized) and inclusion of informal care.
This review is the first to have focused on costs in different stages of dementia. The stage is an important determinant of costs. However, characteristics of individual studies need to be considered, when making use of their results.
PubMed ID
19694634 View in PubMed
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The effect of group homes for the mentally ill on residential property values.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230213
Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1989 Sep;40(9):957-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1989
Author
K M Boydell
J N Trainor
A M Pierri
Author Affiliation
Community Support and Research Unit, Queen Street Mental Health Centre, Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1989 Sep;40(9):957-8
Date
Sep-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Catchment Area (Health)
Community-Institutional Relations - economics
Halfway Houses - economics
Humans
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation
Ontario
PubMed ID
2793102 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of housing adaptation interventions: integrating the economic perspective into occupational therapy practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262808
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2014 Sep;21(5):323-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Carlos Chiatti
Susanne Iwarsson
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2014 Sep;21(5):323-33
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Architectural Accessibility - economics
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Disability Evaluation
Housing - economics
Humans
Independent living
Occupational Therapy - methods
Program Evaluation
Quality of Life
Self-Help Devices
Sweden
Abstract
The home environment is a key determinant of health, quality of life, and well-being. Given its relevance for such aspects, the scarcity of evaluations of housing adaptation (HA) interventions aimed at removing environmental barriers and accessibility problems in the homes of people with disabilities is surprising. This article aims to contribute to the development of strategies for economic evaluations of HA interventions, by stimulating the dissemination and application of the concepts of effectiveness, cost, and cost-effectiveness as used within health economics.
The focus is limited to three overarching questions for the evaluation of HA interventions. Considering X and Y as two hypothetical interventions for the same individual case, the article asks: (i) Will X be more effective than Y?; (ii) Will X cost more than Y?, and (iii) Will X be more cost-effective than Y? Vignette-like descriptions of fictional cases are used to exemplify the economic concepts explained in the article.
In the conclusion, the need is stressed for new experimental data regarding both costs and outcomes of HA interventions, in order to realize sound evaluations with the potential to inform policy and professionals in this field. Given the heterogeneity among national contexts, systematic approaches applied in a coherent manner could strengthen cross-national research and collaborations.
PubMed ID
24784725 View in PubMed
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Evictions and suicide: a follow-up study of almost 22,000 Swedish households in the wake of the global financial crisis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280709
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2016 Apr;70(4):409-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Yerko Rojas
Sten-Åke Stenberg
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2016 Apr;70(4):409-13
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Economic Recession - statistics & numerical data
Family Characteristics
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Homeless Persons - psychology
Housing - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Social Problems
Socioeconomic Factors
Substance-Related Disorders - complications - epidemiology
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Millions of families across the world are evicted every year. However, very little is known about the impact that eviction has on their lives. This lack of knowledge is also starting to be noticed within the suicidological literature, and prominent scholars are arguing that there is an urgent need to explore the extent to which suicides may be considered a plausible consequence of being faced with eviction.
The present study's sample consists of all persons served with an application for execution of an eviction order during 2009-2012. This group is compared to a random 10% sample of the general Swedish population, ages 16 years and over. The analysis is based on penalised maximum likelihood logistic regressions.
Those who had lost their legal right to their dwellings and for whom the landlord had applied for the eviction to be executed were approximately four times more likely to commit suicide than those who had not been exposed to this experience (OR=4.42), controlling for several demographic, socioeconomic and mental health conditions prior to the date of the judicial decision.
Home evictions have a significant and detrimental impact on individuals' risk of committing suicide, even when several other well-known suicidogenic risk factors are controlled for. Our results reinforce the importance of ongoing attempts to remove the issue of evictions from its status as a hidden and neglected social problem.
Notes
Cites: Psychiatr Serv. 2006 Feb;57(2):273-416452711
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2015 Feb;105(2):311-625033148
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2010 Feb;70(3):420-719910098
Cites: Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2007 Feb;37(1):103-1217397284
PubMed ID
26537566 View in PubMed
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The evolution of government independent living policies and programmes for Canadians with disabilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188387
Source
Int J Rehabil Res. 2002 Sep;25(3):215-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Peter Dunn
Author Affiliation
Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Int J Rehabil Res. 2002 Sep;25(3):215-24
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Architectural Accessibility
Canada
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation
Government Programs - trends
Health Policy
Housing - economics
Humans
Social Support
Transportation
Abstract
Government policies and programmes in Canada have been slowly evolving from a focus on institutional care to traditional programmes in the community. Now, a new paradigm of services is emerging which emphasizes the concepts of independent living. This study collected extensive information from government officials and consumer groups across Canada regarding the trends in barrier-free housing, accessible transportation and personal supports from 1980 to the present time. The research documents some of the major issues with government initiatives as well as promising innovations. Although many positive changes were made during the Decade of Disabled Persons (1983-1992), many of these initiatives were eroded with major funding cutbacks in the mid- to late 1990s. This paper concludes with ways to change the present service delivery system to ensure that everyone can live independently in the community.
PubMed ID
12352175 View in PubMed
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Experiences of being homeless or at risk of being homeless among Canadian youths.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176065
Source
Adolescence. 2004;39(156):735-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Pamela Miller
Peter Donahue
Dave Este
Marvin Hofer
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Work, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada. millerp@ucalgary.ca
Source
Adolescence. 2004;39(156):735-55
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - ethnology
Domestic Violence - ethnology
Emigration and Immigration
Employment
Female
Homeless Persons - psychology
Homeless Youth - education - ethnology - psychology
Housing - economics
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Interviews as Topic
Male
Personal Autonomy
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
A qualitative study was undertaken with four groups--immigrants, youths, Aboriginal people, and landlords--in order to explore, compare, and contrast diversity issues among the homeless population and those at risk of homelessness in a larger Canadian city (Calgary, Alberta) with a smaller city (Lethbridge, Alberta), to better understand their and to needs make recommendations for improvement in service delivery and policy formation. This paper focuses on the findings from our sample of youths who shared information on a range of factors that contributed to their being homeless or at risk of being homeless. The youths in this study also shared their positive as well as negative experiences with educators, peers, family members, and social service providers. Canada's homeless include growing numbers of young people, families, women, and members of various ethnic communities, including Aboriginal people and immigrants. Today it is no longer possible to articulate a single silhouette of the homeless, but rather a diversity of profiles is needed. It was in the light of this reality that a study, "Diversity Among the Homeless and Those At Risk," was carried out. It was undertaken with four groups--immigrants, youths, Aboriginal people, and landlords.
PubMed ID
15727411 View in PubMed
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Exploring the value of mixed methods within the At Home/Chez Soi housing first project: a strategy to evaluate the implementation of a complex population health intervention for people with mental illness who have been homeless.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128388
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012;103(7 Suppl 1):eS57-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Eric L Macnaughton
Paula N Goering
Geoffrey B Nelson
Author Affiliation
At Home/Chez Soi Project, Mental Health Commission of Canada, Calgary, Alberta. emacnaug@shaw.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012;103(7 Suppl 1):eS57-63
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Mental Health Services - methods - organization & administration
Homeless Persons - psychology
Housing - economics
Humans
Mental Disorders - therapy
Organizational Case Studies
Qualitative Research
Research Design
Social Support
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
This paper is a methodological case study that describes the At Home/Chez Soi (Housing First) Initiative's mixed-methods strategy for implementation evaluation and discusses the value of these methods in evaluating the implementation of such complex population health interventions.
The Housing First (HF) model is being implemented in five cities: Vancouver, Winnipeg, Toronto, Montréal and Moncton.
At Home/Chez Soi is an intervention trial that aims to address the issue of homelessness in people with mental health issues. The HF model emphasizes choices, hopefulness and connecting people with resources that make a difference to their quality of life. A component of HF is supported housing, which provides a rent subsidy and rapid access to housing of choice in private apartments; a second component is support. Quantitative and qualitative methods were used to evaluate HF implementation.
The findings of this case study illustrate how the critical ingredients of complex interventions, such as HF, can be adapted to different contexts while implementation fidelity is maintained at a theoretical level. The findings also illustrate how the project's mixed methods approach helped to facilitate the adaptation process. Another value of this approach is that it identifies systemic and organizational factors (e.g., housing supply, discrimination, housing procurement strategy) that affect implementation of key elements of HF.
In general, the approach provides information about both whether and how key aspects of the intervention are implemented effectively across different settings. It thus provides implementation data that are rigorous, contextually relevant and practical.
PubMed ID
23618052 View in PubMed
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Feasibility of epilepsy follow-up care through telemedicine: a pilot study on the patient's perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159843
Source
Epilepsia. 2008 Apr;49(4):573-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Syed Nizamuddin Ahmed
Carly Mann
D Barry Sinclair
Angela Heino
Blayne Iskiw
Daphne Quigley
Arto Ohinmaa
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, University of Alberta Hospital, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. snahmed@ualberta.ca
Source
Epilepsia. 2008 Apr;49(4):573-85
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aftercare - methods - standards
Aged
Attitude to Health
Canada
Cost of Illness
Costs and Cost Analysis
Epilepsy - psychology - therapy
Feasibility Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Care Costs
Housing - economics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient satisfaction
Pilot Projects
Questionnaires
Telemedicine - economics - methods
Travel - economics
Treatment Outcome
Videoconferencing - economics
Abstract
Cost analysis and patient satisfaction with telemedicine in epilepsy care.
This controlled study included out-of-town epilepsy patients coming to follow-up at the University of Alberta hospital epilepsy clinic. After an informed consent, patients were randomized to either conventional (n = 18) or telemedicine (n = 23) clinics. Patients or caregivers filled patient satisfaction and travel cost questionnaires in both alternatives. Cost per visit analysis included costs of traveling, lodging, and lost productivity.
Average age of the population was 41 years (range 19-73; 45% women). Eighty-three percent of patients preferred their next visit through telemedicine. About 90% of patients indicated a need for companion travel (mainly by car) to conventional clinic. For the conventional group patients the value of lost productivity was CAD $201, hotel cost CAD $8.50, and the value of car mileage CAD $256.50, totaling about CAD $466.00. Patient costs for telemedicine were CAD $35.85. Telemedicine production costs are similar to the patients' savings in traveling and lost productivity. About 90% of patients in both groups were satisfied with the quality of the service.
Telemedicine can play a role in follow-up care of epilepsy patients, reduce patient costs, and improve patient satisfaction. This is the first full-time epilepsy telemedicine clinic in Western Canada.
PubMed ID
18076644 View in PubMed
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A few questions to ask yourself before you go mortgage shopping.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203433
Source
Ont Dent. 1998 Sep;75(7):41-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1998
Author
W G Leggett
Author Affiliation
Canadian Dental Service Plans Inc.
Source
Ont Dent. 1998 Sep;75(7):41-3
Date
Sep-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dentists - economics
Housing - economics
Humans
Ontario
PubMed ID
9879262 View in PubMed
Less detail

32 records – page 1 of 4.