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A life-course approach to studying transitions among Canadian seniors in couple-only households.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133005
Source
Can Public Policy. 2011;37(Suppl):S57-S71
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Lisa Strohschein
Source
Can Public Policy. 2011;37(Suppl):S57-S71
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - ethnology
Family Relations - ethnology - legislation & jurisprudence
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Housekeeping - economics - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Institutionalization - economics - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Life Change Events - history
Marriage - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Residence Characteristics - history
Retirement - economics - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors - history
Spouses - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Widowhood - economics - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Abstract
This study tracked the occurrence of death, widowhood, institutionalization, and coresidence with others between 1994 and 2002 for a nationally representative sample of 1,580 Canadian respondents who, at initial interview, were aged 55 and older and living in a couple-only household. Although the majority of seniors remained in a couple-only household throughout the duration of the survey, nearly one in four who experienced a first transition underwent one or more subsequent transitions. Age, economic resources, and health were significant predictors of a specific first transition and multiple transitions. More work is needed to understand the dynamics of the aging process.
PubMed ID
21751485 View in PubMed
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Wage labor, housing policy, and the nucleation of Inuit households.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176794
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2005;42(2):66-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Pamela Stern
Source
Arctic Anthropol. 2005;42(2):66-81
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - ethnology
Employment - economics - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Family Health - ethnology
Government Programs - economics - education - history - legislation & jurisprudence
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Housekeeping - economics - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Housing - economics - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Inuits - education - ethnology - history - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Northwest Territories - ethnology
Nuclear Family - ethnology - history - psychology
Public Policy - economics - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Residence Characteristics - history
Social Support
Abstract
Public policy practices in the Canadian North, particularly those connected to housing and employment, are encouraging a reorganization of Inuit social organization to more closely resemble the insular and independent nuclear family household idealized by Eurocanadians. This has wide-ranging implications for the social stability of northern communities without sufficient employment opportunities. The paper examines the symbolic and structural effects of housing policies and employment on culturally valued social practices such as sharing in Holman, a community in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region of the Northwest Territories of Canada.
PubMed ID
21847838 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.