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90 records – page 1 of 9.

Altered frequency distribution in the electroencephalogram is correlated to the analgesic effect of remifentanil.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269341
Source
Basic Clin Pharmacol Toxicol. 2015 May;116(5):414-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Carina Graversen
Lasse P Malver
Geana P Kurita
Camilla Staahl
Lona L Christrup
Per Sjøgren
Asbjørn M Drewes
Source
Basic Clin Pharmacol Toxicol. 2015 May;116(5):414-22
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analgesics, Opioid - administration & dosage
Brain - drug effects - physiopathology
Brain Waves - drug effects
Cross-Over Studies
Denmark
Double-Blind Method
Electroencephalography
Healthy Volunteers
Hot Temperature - adverse effects
Humans
Infusions, Parenteral
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Pain - etiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Pain Measurement
Pain Perception - drug effects
Pain Threshold - drug effects
Piperidines - administration & dosage
Predictive value of tests
Pressure - adverse effects
Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Opioids alter resting state brain oscillations by multiple and complex factors, which are still to be elucidated. To increase our knowledge, multi-channel electroencephalography (EEG) was subjected to multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA), to identify the most descriptive frequency bands and scalp locations altered by remifentanil in healthy volunteers. Sixty-two channels of resting EEG followed by independent measures of pain scores to heat and bone pain were recorded in 21 healthy males before and during remifentanil infusion in a placebo-controlled, double-blind crossover study. EEG frequency distributions were extracted by a continuous wavelet transform and normalized into delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma bands. Alterations relative to pre-treatment responses were calculated for all channels and used as input to the MVPA. Compared to placebo, remifentanil increased the delta band and decreased the theta and alpha band oscillations as a mean over all channels (all p = 0.007). The most discriminative channels in these frequency bands were F1 in delta (83.33%, p = 0.0023) and theta bands (95.24%, p
PubMed ID
25250670 View in PubMed
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Anatomy of heat waves and mortality in Toronto: lessons for public health protection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160461
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Sep-Oct;98(5):364-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
L David Pengelly
Monica E Campbell
Chad S Cheng
Chao Fu
Sarah E Gingrich
Ronald Macfarlane
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Sep-Oct;98(5):364-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Climate
Cost of Illness
Forecasting
Greenhouse Effect
Heat Stress Disorders - mortality - prevention & control
Heat Stroke - mortality - prevention & control
Hot Temperature - adverse effects
Humans
Ontario - epidemiology
Principal Component Analysis
Public Health Administration
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Seasons
Abstract
Periods of unusually hot weather, especially in temperate climates, carry with them a burden of morbidity and mortality, particularly in urban areas. With lessening debate on its origins, and signs of global warming already apparent, it is becoming imperative for public health practitioners to recognize and predict the risks of "heat waves", and to develop protective community responses to them. This study makes use of historical data and a methodology developed previously to examine the pattern of hot weather experienced over the last five decades in the City of Toronto, and to assess the associated burden of mortality.
Synoptic classification of air masses based on meteorological data for Toronto was used, to assign the annual mean burden of illness (in terms of elevated mortality) associated with hot weather and air pollution. Then, coefficients relating daily mortality risk to historical daily weather and air quality data were determined with a model system that (for each air mass) assessed the factors that contributed to day-to-day variability in mortality.
Over the period of study, there were 120 (95% CI: 105-135) heat-related deaths on average per year, with great variability from year to year, reflecting the variability of hot weather. Mortality was greatest in July and August, when the greatest number of multi-day heat episodes occurred. Furthermore, the longer the episode, the greater was the daily risk for mortality.
The method can be used to forecast the risk of heat-related mortality, and to facilitate the development of public health responses to mitigate that risk.
PubMed ID
17985676 View in PubMed
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[Blood pressure elevation among industrial workers exposed to stress].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228362
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Sep 20;110(22):2873-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-20-1990
Author
J. Erikssen
K. Knudsen
P. Mowinckel
T. Guthe
J P Holm
R. Brandtzaeg
K. Rodahl
Author Affiliation
Medisinsk avdeling, Sentralsykehuset i Akershus, Nordbyhagen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Sep 20;110(22):2873-7
Date
Sep-20-1990
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Hot Temperature - adverse effects
Humans
Hypertension - etiology - psychology
Male
Metallurgy
Middle Aged
Norway
Occupational Diseases - etiology - psychology
Psychophysiologic Disorders - etiology
Stress, Physiological
Stress, Psychological - complications
Abstract
A standardized, annual medical examination of a group of heat workers exposed to, and another group not exposed to heat in a Norwegian ferro-alloy plant over a period of six years showed no statistically significant difference in blood pressure between the two groups. However, following three years of stable blood pressure and heart rates, both parameters increased markedly in both groups. The occurrence of this sudden increase in blood pressure coincided with the plant being threatened with the possibility of closure due to inability to operate at a profit. This threat persisted for more than two years, but even afterwards, when it was quite clear that jobs at the plant were no longer threatened, the blood pressure remained markedly elevated. These findings emphasize the importance of being aware of the possible relationship between prolonged mental stress and hypertension.
PubMed ID
2219064 View in PubMed
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[Blood pressure in aluminum plant workers employed in high and in normal temperature sections in Ardal].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244004
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1981 Nov 30;101(33):1892-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-30-1981

Changes in summer temperature and heat-related mortality since 1971 in North Carolina, South Finland, and Southeast England.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186902
Source
Environ Res. 2003 Jan;91(1):1-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
G C Donaldson
W R Keatinge
S. Näyhä
Author Affiliation
St Bartholomew's and the Royal London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary and Westfield College, University of London, London E1 4NS, UK.
Source
Environ Res. 2003 Jan;91(1):1-7
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
England - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Greenhouse Effect
Hot Temperature - adverse effects
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
North Carolina - epidemiology
Regression Analysis
Seasons
Sex Factors
Abstract
Three climatically diverse regions were studied to determine the impact of temperature change on heat-related mortality from 1971 to 1997. Median regressions showed that May-August temperatures in North Carolina rose by 1.0 degrees C (95% CL 0.0-2.0 degrees C) from 23.5 degrees C (74.3 degrees F), were unchanged in South Finland at 13.5 degrees C (56.3 degrees F), and rose in Southeast England 2.1 degrees C (0.3-4.0 degrees C) from 14.9 degrees C (58.8 degrees F). After determining for each region the daily temperature (as a 3 degrees C band) at which the mortality was the lowest, annual heat-related mortality was obtained as excess mortality per million at temperatures above this. Annual heat-related mortality per million (among the population at risk, aged 55+) fell in North Carolina by 212 (59-365) from 228 (140-317) to only 16 (not significant, NS); fell in South Finland by 282 (66-500) from 382 (257-507) to 99 (NS); and fell in Southeast England by 2.4 (NS) from 111 (41-180) to 108 (41-176). The falls in North Carolina and South Finland remained significant after allowances were made for changes in age, sex, and baseline mortality. Increased air conditioning probably explains the virtual disappearance of heat-related mortality in the hottest region, North Carolina, despite warmer summers. Other lifestyle changes associated with increasing prosperity probably explain the favorable trends in the cooler regions.
PubMed ID
12550082 View in PubMed
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[Climate change and consequences for the elderly]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95346
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3188-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-26-2009
Author
Hendriksen Carsten
Vass Mikkel
Author Affiliation
Afdelingen for Social Medicin, Institut for Folkesundhedsvidenskab, Københavns Universitet, Postboks 2099, DK-1014 København K, Denmark. ch17@bbh.regionh.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3188-90
Date
Oct-26-2009
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Climate
Frail Elderly
Greenhouse Effect
Hot Temperature - adverse effects
Humans
Risk factors
World Health
Abstract
Heat waves may cause increased mortality, especially among frail elderly. The consequences of heat waves can be prevented by reducing indoor temperature, increasing intake of water with relevant electrolytes and ongoing assessment of medication and chronic disease. The regional and municipal administrative bodies should create management plans for heat waves and other extreme weather situations.
PubMed ID
19857399 View in PubMed
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[Clinical features of acute carbon monoxide occupational poisonings complicated by thermochemical damage to upper respiratory tract].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150424
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2009;(4):14-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
E V Polozova
V V Shilov
A N Nikanov
N M Frolova
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2009;(4):14-8
Date
2009
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Carbon Monoxide Poisoning - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hot Temperature - adverse effects
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Smoke Inhalation Injury - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
Findings are that thermochemical damage to upper respiratory tract makes course of acute occupational and household carbon monoxide poisonings significantly more severe. Inpatient treatment duration appeared to correspond with degree of respiratory tract involvement. Coma depth and duration, artificial lungs ventilation terms, complications occurrence and severity of inhalation injury appeared to be directly dependent.
PubMed ID
19514164 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Duodecim. 2005;121(4):433-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Simo Näyhä
Author Affiliation
Oulun yliopiston kansanterveystieteen ja yleislääketieteen laitos ja Oulun aletyöterveyslaitos.
Source
Duodecim. 2005;121(4):433-9
Date
2005
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cause of Death
Climate
Cold Temperature - adverse effects
Female
Fever - diagnosis - mortality
Finland - epidemiology
Hot Temperature - adverse effects
Humans
Hypothermia - diagnosis - mortality
Male
Risk assessment
Seasons
PubMed ID
15799266 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Consequences of climate changes for the health status in Sweden. Heat waves and disease transmission most alarming]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92461
Source
Lakartidningen. 2008 Jul 9-22;105(28-29):2018-23
Publication Type
Article

Continuous vs. intermittent work with Canadian Forces NBC clothing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220724
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 1993 Jul;64(7):595-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1993
Author
T M McLellan
I. Jacobs
J B Bain
Author Affiliation
Defence and Civil Institute of Environmental Medicine, North York, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Aviat Space Environ Med. 1993 Jul;64(7):595-8
Date
Jul-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Energy Metabolism
Hot Temperature - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Military Personnel
Oxygen consumption
Physical Endurance
Physical Exertion - physiology
Protective Clothing
Stress, Physiological - complications
Abstract
This study examined the benefits of work and rest schedules on soldiers' work tolerance (WTT) while wearing various levels of nuclear, biological and chemical (NBC) defence protective clothing in a warm environment (30 degrees C and 50% R.H.). Eight unacclimatized males were assigned to exercise at either a light (walking 1.11 m.s-1 0% grade, alternating with lifting 10 kg) or heavy metabolic rate (walking 1.33 m.s-1 7.5% grade, alternating with lifting 20 kg). Subjects were tested wearing three levels of clothing protection: combat clothing (L); combats and a semi-permeable NBC overgarment with the hood down (M); combats and NBC overgarment, gloves, boots and respirator (H). For each clothing configuration, subjects were evaluated using both a "continuous" exercise protocol and an intermittent work and rest schedule. WTT was defined as the time until rectal temperature (Tre) reached 39.3 degrees C, heart rate reached 95% maximum, dizziness or nausea precluded further exercise, or 5 h had elapsed. Assuming a resting VO2 of 4 ml.kg-1 x min-1 an average metabolic rate was calculated for all trials. A decreasing hyperbolic function described the relationship between WTT and metabolic rate for M and H. These relationships facilitate quantification of appropriate work and rest schedules if the metabolic rate of a task is known.
PubMed ID
8357311 View in PubMed
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90 records – page 1 of 9.