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283 records – page 1 of 29.

Source
Journal of Physiology. 1949 Dec;110(3-4):330-7.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1949
Author
Glaser, E.M.
Source
Journal of Physiology. 1949 Dec;110(3-4):330-7.
Date
1949
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acclimatization
Cold Temperature
Hot Temperature
Humans
PubMed ID
15406433 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acrylamide-asparagine relationship in baked/toasted wheat and rye breads.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156290
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2008 Aug;25(8):921-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Kit Granby
Nikoline Juul Nielsen
Rikke V Hedegaard
Tue Christensen
Mette Kann
Leif H Skibsted
Author Affiliation
Technical University of Denmark, National food Institute, Søborg, DK-2860, Denmark. kgr@food.dtu.dk
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2008 Aug;25(8):921-9
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylamide - analysis
Asparagine - analysis
Bread - analysis
Carcinogens - analysis
Cooking - methods
Denmark
Diet
Flour
Food Technology - methods
Hot Temperature
Humans
Maillard Reaction
Risk Assessment - methods
Secale cereale
Triticum
Abstract
Acrylamide in baked and toasted wheat and rye bread was studied in relation to levels of asparagine in flour, dough, bread and toasts. Asparagine was consumed during bread preparation resulting in reduced acrylamide content in the products. In wheat bread, 12% of the asparagine initially present in the flour (0.14 g kg(-1)) remained after yeast fermentation and baking; for rye bread, 82% of asparagine remained after sourdough fermentation and baking. Asparagine present in untoasted wheat bread had totally reacted after hard toasting. Toasted wheat and rye bread slices contained 11-161 and 27-205 microg kg(-1) acrylamide, respectively, compared to untoasted wheat and rye bread with
PubMed ID
18608496 View in PubMed
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[A laboratory model of the cyanobacterial mat from the Kotel'nikovskii hot spring (Baikal Region)]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91824
Source
Mikrobiologiia. 2008 Jul-Aug;77(4):551-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Brianskaia A V
Orleanskii V K
Dagurova O P
Source
Mikrobiologiia. 2008 Jul-Aug;77(4):551-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Fresh Water - microbiology
Hot Springs - microbiology
Hot Temperature
Models, Biological
Oscillatoria - cytology - isolation & purification - physiology
Siberia
Water Microbiology
Abstract
A laboratory model of the cyanobacterial community of the Kotel'nikovskii hot spring (Baikal Region) was developed. A step-by-step description of the algocenosis formation along both the time and temperature gradient was given. The natural and laboratory mats were compared, and the major differences in the qualitative and quantitative composition of the cyanobacterial community were revealed. The laboratory algocenosis was stratified by species composition and was characterized by rapid replacement of the dominant cyanobacterial species depending on the temperature gradient. The formation of the community structure occurred over the 18 days of the experiment. In space and time, the sequence of species emergence in the cyanobacterial mat was as follows: Mastigocladus laminosus --> Phormidium tenue --> Ph. ambiguum --> Ph. valderiae. The species composition of the laboratory mat was similar to that of the natural mat; however it was found to be less diverse.
PubMed ID
18825983 View in PubMed
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Altered frequency distribution in the electroencephalogram is correlated to the analgesic effect of remifentanil.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269341
Source
Basic Clin Pharmacol Toxicol. 2015 May;116(5):414-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Carina Graversen
Lasse P Malver
Geana P Kurita
Camilla Staahl
Lona L Christrup
Per Sjøgren
Asbjørn M Drewes
Source
Basic Clin Pharmacol Toxicol. 2015 May;116(5):414-22
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analgesics, Opioid - administration & dosage
Brain - drug effects - physiopathology
Brain Waves - drug effects
Cross-Over Studies
Denmark
Double-Blind Method
Electroencephalography
Healthy Volunteers
Hot Temperature - adverse effects
Humans
Infusions, Parenteral
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Pain - etiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Pain Measurement
Pain Perception - drug effects
Pain Threshold - drug effects
Piperidines - administration & dosage
Predictive value of tests
Pressure - adverse effects
Signal Processing, Computer-Assisted
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Opioids alter resting state brain oscillations by multiple and complex factors, which are still to be elucidated. To increase our knowledge, multi-channel electroencephalography (EEG) was subjected to multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA), to identify the most descriptive frequency bands and scalp locations altered by remifentanil in healthy volunteers. Sixty-two channels of resting EEG followed by independent measures of pain scores to heat and bone pain were recorded in 21 healthy males before and during remifentanil infusion in a placebo-controlled, double-blind crossover study. EEG frequency distributions were extracted by a continuous wavelet transform and normalized into delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma bands. Alterations relative to pre-treatment responses were calculated for all channels and used as input to the MVPA. Compared to placebo, remifentanil increased the delta band and decreased the theta and alpha band oscillations as a mean over all channels (all p = 0.007). The most discriminative channels in these frequency bands were F1 in delta (83.33%, p = 0.0023) and theta bands (95.24%, p
PubMed ID
25250670 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anatomy of heat waves and mortality in Toronto: lessons for public health protection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160461
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Sep-Oct;98(5):364-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
L David Pengelly
Monica E Campbell
Chad S Cheng
Chao Fu
Sarah E Gingrich
Ronald Macfarlane
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Sep-Oct;98(5):364-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Climate
Cost of Illness
Forecasting
Greenhouse Effect
Heat Stress Disorders - mortality - prevention & control
Heat Stroke - mortality - prevention & control
Hot Temperature - adverse effects
Humans
Ontario - epidemiology
Principal Component Analysis
Public Health Administration
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Seasons
Abstract
Periods of unusually hot weather, especially in temperate climates, carry with them a burden of morbidity and mortality, particularly in urban areas. With lessening debate on its origins, and signs of global warming already apparent, it is becoming imperative for public health practitioners to recognize and predict the risks of "heat waves", and to develop protective community responses to them. This study makes use of historical data and a methodology developed previously to examine the pattern of hot weather experienced over the last five decades in the City of Toronto, and to assess the associated burden of mortality.
Synoptic classification of air masses based on meteorological data for Toronto was used, to assign the annual mean burden of illness (in terms of elevated mortality) associated with hot weather and air pollution. Then, coefficients relating daily mortality risk to historical daily weather and air quality data were determined with a model system that (for each air mass) assessed the factors that contributed to day-to-day variability in mortality.
Over the period of study, there were 120 (95% CI: 105-135) heat-related deaths on average per year, with great variability from year to year, reflecting the variability of hot weather. Mortality was greatest in July and August, when the greatest number of multi-day heat episodes occurred. Furthermore, the longer the episode, the greater was the daily risk for mortality.
The method can be used to forecast the risk of heat-related mortality, and to facilitate the development of public health responses to mitigate that risk.
PubMed ID
17985676 View in PubMed
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Application of monitoring data for Giardia and Cryptosporidium to boil water advisories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191692
Source
Risk Anal. 2001 Dec;21(6):1077-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
P M Wallis
D. Matson
M. Jones
J. Jamieson
Author Affiliation
Hyperion Research Ltd., Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Risk Anal. 2001 Dec;21(6):1077-85
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cryptosporidiosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cryptosporidium - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Disease Outbreaks
Giardia - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Giardiasis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Hot Temperature
Humans
Oregon - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Water - parasitology
Water Purification - methods
Water supply
Abstract
Despite the problems associated with analyzing water samples for Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts, the data can be very useful if their strengths and weaknesses are understood. Two municipalities in northern Ontario, Temagami and Thunder Bay, both issued boil water advisories for Giardia contamination. Data from these two cities are compared to show that only one municipality experienced a real outbreak, whereas the other did not. The concentration of Giardia cysts was much higher than background during the outbreak at Temagami, and the postoutbreak concentrations of cysts were very similar to the long-term average cyst concentration at Thunder Bay. The waterborne outbreak of giardiasis at Temagami was characterized by consistent positive results from water samples, concentrations two to three orders of magnitude higher than normal, and an obvious increase in the number of cases of giardiasis in the population. No outbreak was experienced at Thunder Bay, but a boil water advisory (BWA) was set in place for more than a year on the basis of a single sample from Loch Lomond in which only two cysts were detected but the sample equivalent volume was low. This gave the impression of a sudden increase in concentration, but 39 of 41 subsequent samples were negative. Additional factors that led to a BWA at Thunder Bay are described, and recommendations are presented to help determine when a BWA is necessary and when it should be rescinded.
PubMed ID
11824683 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Arctic Sun System for hypothermia treatment after near-drowning]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93802
Source
Anestezjol Intens Ter. 2008 Jan-Mar;40(1):32-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Franczuk Pawel
Krawczyk Pawel
Author Affiliation
Klinika Chorób Wewnetrznych i Gerontologii CM UJ w Krakowie. franczuk@mp.pl
Source
Anestezjol Intens Ter. 2008 Jan-Mar;40(1):32-4
Language
Polish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Hot Temperature - therapeutic use
Humans
Hypothermia - etiology - therapy
Middle Aged
Near Drowning - complications
Rewarming - instrumentation - methods
Suicide, Attempted
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Hypothermia is frequently observed in near-downing victims, and rewarming is difficult to control. We describe the use of an automatic heating system (Arctic Sun Temperature Management System). The device consists of hydrogel coated pads that adhere to the patient's abdomen, back and thighs, and react to patient temperature by automatically adjusting the circulating pad water temperature to achieve a preset patient target temperature. Temperature is measured by a bladder temperature probe. The process of warming can be adjusted to allow the body temperature to increase at a rate from 0.5 to 1.0 degree C h(-1). CASE REPORT: A 62-yr-old woman was rescued from the Vistula river after a suicide attempt. The temperature of the river water was 150C and it was not possible to estimate the time she was submerged. On admission she was conscious and maintaining partially logical communication. She was hypothermic (temperature measured in the bladder was 32.7 degrees C), and dyspnoeic (SaO2
PubMed ID
19469096 View in PubMed
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283 records – page 1 of 29.