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Balancing incentives in the compensation contracts of nonprofit hospital CEOs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193992
Source
J Health Econ. 2001 Jul;20(4):509-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2001
Author
C. Preyra
G. Pink
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Administration, University of Toronto, Ont, Canada. colin@preyra.com
Source
J Health Econ. 2001 Jul;20(4):509-25
Date
Jul-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chief Executive Officers, Hospital - economics
Contract Services - economics
Decision Making, Organizational
Employee Incentive Plans
Governing Board
Hospitals, Voluntary - economics - organization & administration
Humans
Models, Econometric
Ontario
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
Abstract
Given the considerable insight into corporate governance achieved through studies of executive compensation in proprietary firms it is surprising that executive contracting in nonprofit organizations remains largely unexplored. In this paper, we use the multitask principal agent model of Holmström and Milgrom [The Journal of Law, Economics and Organization 7 (1991) (Suppl.) 24] to argue that nonprofit hospitals represent an optimal response to information asymmetries between managers and boards. For a board with multidimensional objectives, the agency problem is getting top executives to distribute their efforts across all dimensions of the hospital's mission. The nonprofit form is preferred because the absence of high powered incentives such as share ownership reduces executives' incentives to place undue emphasis on improving financial performance at the expense of important but less observable tasks. Using newly available compensation data we test the model by comparing the conditional distributions of earnings for industrial and nonprofit hospital CEOs in Ontario. Our best estimates are that CEOs in publicly traded firms earn twice as much on average as those in similarly sized nonprofit hospitals but bear roughly eight times the income variance. Estimates of the associated degree of risk aversion are well within conventional bounds and are consistent with the trade-off between insurance and incentives predicted by the theory.
PubMed ID
11463186 View in PubMed
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CEO compensation and hospital financial performance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149648
Source
Med Care Res Rev. 2009 Dec;66(6):725-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Kristin L Reiter
Guillermo A Sandoval
Adalsteinn D Brown
George H Pink
Author Affiliation
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7411, USA. reiter@email.unc.edu
Source
Med Care Res Rev. 2009 Dec;66(6):725-38
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Benchmarking
Economics, Hospital
Employee Incentive Plans
Female
Financial Management, Hospital
Hospital Administrators - economics
Hospitals, Voluntary - economics - organization & administration
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Ontario
Regression Analysis
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
Abstract
Growing interest in pay-for-performance and the level of chief executive officers' (CEOs') pay raises questions about the link between performance and compensation in the health sector. This study compares the compensation of nonprofit hospital CEOs in Ontario, Canada to the three longest reported and most used measures of hospital financial performance. Our sample consisted of 132 CEOs from 92 hospitals between 1999 and 2006. Unbalanced panel data were analyzed using fixed effects regression. Results suggest that CEO compensation was largely unrelated to hospital financial performance. Inflation-adjusted salaries appeared to increase over time independent of hospital performance, and hospital size was positively correlated with CEO compensation. The apparent upward trend in salary despite some declines in financial performance challenges the fundamental assumption underlying this article, that is, financial performance is likely linked to CEO compensation in Ontario. Further research is needed to understand long-term performance related to compensation incentives.
Notes
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Cites: Healthc Financ Manage. 2008 Jun;62(6):24-5, 2718637537
Cites: Mod Healthc. 2001 Jul 30;31(31):27-30, 32-3, 3811508139
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Cites: J Health Care Finance. 2001 Spring;27(3):1-2014680029
Cites: Health Care Manage Rev. 1993 Summer;18(3):31-408225963
Cites: Mod Healthc. 2005 Jun 27;35(26):6-7, 12, 116001486
Cites: Inquiry. 2005 Summer;42(2):110-716196309
Cites: Mod Healthc. 2006 Jan 23;36(4):12-316480099
Cites: Healthc Q. 2006;9(1):40-5, 216550648
Cites: Mod Healthc. 2006 Apr 17;36(16-17):416673660
Cites: Healthc Financ Manage. 2006 Jun;60(6):74-816773990
Cites: Trustee. 2007 Jul-Aug;60(7):22-6, 117685364
Cites: J Health Econ. 2001 Jul;20(4):509-2511463186
PubMed ID
19605619 View in PubMed
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Costs associated with resource utilization during the palliative phase of care: a Canadian perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147908
Source
Palliat Med. 2009 Dec;23(8):708-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Serge Dumont
Philip Jacobs
Konrad Fassbender
Donna Anderson
Véronique Turcotte
François Harel
Author Affiliation
School of Social Work, Laval University; Laval University Cancer Research Center, Quebec, Quebec, Canada G1V 0A6. Serge.Dumont@svs.ulaval.ca
Source
Palliat Med. 2009 Dec;23(8):708-17
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulatory Care - economics - utilization
Canada
Costs and Cost Analysis
Family Health
Female
Health Care Costs - statistics & numerical data
Health Resources - economics - utilization
Home Care Services - economics - utilization
Home Nursing - economics - utilization
Hospitalization - economics
Hospitals, Voluntary - economics - utilization
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
National Health Programs - economics
Palliative Care - economics - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Terminal Care - economics
Abstract
This study aimed to evaluate prospectively the resource utilization and related costs during the palliative phase of care in five regions across Canada.
A cohort of 248 patients registered in a palliative care program and their main informal caregivers were consecutively recruited.
A prospective research design with repeated measures was adopted. Interviews were conducted at two-week intervals until the patient s passing or up to a maximum of 6 months.
The survey questions prompted participants to provide information on the types and number of goods and services they used, and who paid for these goods and services.
The largest cost component for study participants was inpatient hospital care stays, followed by home care and informal caregiving time. In regard to cost sharing, the public health care system (PHCS), the family, and not-for-profit organizations (NFPO) sustained respectively 71.3%, 26.6%, and 1.6% of the mean total cost per patient.
Such results provide a comprehensive picture of costs related to palliative care in Canada, by specifying the cost sharing between the PHCS, the family, and NFPO.
PubMed ID
19837702 View in PubMed
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Distribution and sharing of palliative care costs in rural areas of Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103095
Source
J Palliat Care. 2014;30(2):90-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Serge Dumont
Philip Jacobs
Véronique Turcotte
Stéphane Turcotte
Grace Johnston
Source
J Palliat Care. 2014;30(2):90-8
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Cohort Studies
Cost Sharing - statistics & numerical data
Family
Female
Health Care Costs - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Public - economics
Hospitals, Voluntary - economics
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Palliative Care - economics
Prospective Studies
Rural Health Services - economics
Rural Population
Abstract
Few data are available on the costs occurring during the palliative phase of care and on the sharing of these costs in rural areas. This study aimed to evaluate the costs related to all resources used by rural palliative care patients and to examine how these costs were shared between the public healthcare system (PHCS), patients' families, and not-for-profit organizations (NFPOs). A prospective longitudinal study was undertaken of 82 palliative care patients and their main informal caregivers in rural areas of four Canadian provinces. Telephone interviews were completed at two-week intervals. The mean total cost per patient for a six-month participation in a palliative care program was CA$31,678 +/- 1,160. A large part of this cost was attributable to inpatient hospital stays and was assumed by the PHCS. The patient's family contributed less than a quarter of the mean total cost per patient, and this was mainly attributable to caregiving time.
PubMed ID
25058986 View in PubMed
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A fifteen-year psychogeriatric patient follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240277
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1984 Aug;29(5):412-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1984
Author
H. Grauer
D. Mueller
R. Zelnicker
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1984 Aug;29(5):412-6
Date
Aug-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitals, General
Hospitals, Voluntary
Humans
Institutionalization
Longevity
Male
Mental Disorders - mortality - therapy
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Prognosis
Quebec
Abstract
Two hundred and ninety-one patients, with an average age of 69 in 1965, referred to a psychogeriatric clinic were studied. All but 20 were traced. 167 died and 104 remained alive. 73 were institutionalized. Medical, psychiatric and social data was available for all. Using mortality tables, we calculated the time of death for each patient. The group that exceeded their life expectancy was compared to the group that died prematurely. Significant positive correlations with longevity were self-referral, higher education, skilled work, independent income and absence of dementia. Females and orphans also lived longer. Living alone, dependency on children and conflict with one's spouse predisposed to institutionalization. Curiously, the hardships of being in wartime Europe and/or in a concentration camp increased life expectancy and mitigated against institutionalization. An attempt is made to correlate our findings with other studies and to explain our results.
PubMed ID
6478385 View in PubMed
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The health care debate goes on....and on.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189081
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2002 Jul;18(7):779-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2002

[In vitro fertilization and embryo transfer in a Deaconess Institution. Experience from the first years]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65181
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 Jul 2;152(27):1961-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2-1990
Author
F. Christensen
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 Jul 2;152(27):1961-3
Date
Jul-2-1990
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Clomiphene - administration & dosage
Denmark
Embryo Transfer
English Abstract
Female
Fertilization in Vitro
Hospitals, Voluntary
Humans
Menotropins - administration & dosage
Pregnancy
Abstract
Eighty-one women suffering from occluded Fallopian tubes and 29 women with unexplained infertility were treated with in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET). All procedures were carried out on outpatients. A total of 24 pregnancies were achieved in the group of patients with occluded tubes whereas eight became pregnant in the group of patients treated for unexplained infertility. From these results, it is expected that 30% of women suffering from occluded tubes or unexplained infertility can achieve pregnancy following two IVF-ET treatment cycles.
PubMed ID
2114685 View in PubMed
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Mission statement content and hospital performance in the Canadian not-for-profit health care sector.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201052
Source
Health Care Manage Rev. 1999;24(3):18-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
C K Bart
J C Tabone
Author Affiliation
Michael G. DeGroote School of Business, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Health Care Manage Rev. 1999;24(3):18-29
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Chief Executive Officers, Hospital - psychology
Efficiency, Organizational
Health Services Research
Hospitals, Voluntary - organization & administration
Humans
Organizational Objectives
Organizational Policy
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Questionnaires
Abstract
This article presents the findings from an exploratory research study that assessed the content and impact of mission statements in 103 Canadian not-for-profit health care organizations. The study especially sought to determine if a relationship existed between selected mission statement components and various hospital performance indicators.
PubMed ID
10463104 View in PubMed
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Mission statement rationales and organizational alignment in the not-for-profit health care sector.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204057
Source
Health Care Manage Rev. 1998;23(4):54-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
C K Bart
J C Tabone
Author Affiliation
Michael G. DeGroote School of Business, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Health Care Manage Rev. 1998;23(4):54-69
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Health Care Sector
Health Services Research
Hospitals, Voluntary - economics
Humans
Organizational Affiliation
Organizational Objectives
Organizational Policy
Voluntary Health Agencies - economics
Abstract
This article presents the findings from a research study conducted on the use of mission statements in not-for-profit health care organizations. In particular, the study sought to determine if a relationship exists between the initial "rationales" that led to the creation of a mission statement and hospital performance. The findings suggest that some of the rationales for developing mission statements are indeed more important than others and that organizational alignment with the mission statement is of key importance to both the mission's and the hospital's success.
PubMed ID
9803319 View in PubMed
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14 records – page 1 of 2.