Skip header and navigation

Refine By

31 records – page 1 of 4.

The Advanced Trauma Life Support Program in Manitoba: a 5-year review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221346
Source
Can J Surg. 1993 Apr;36(2):181-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1993
Author
J. Ali
M. Howard
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg.
Source
Can J Surg. 1993 Apr;36(2):181-3
Date
Apr-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Education, Medical, Continuing
Emergency Service, Hospital
Family Practice - education
General Surgery - education
Hospitals, Rural
Hospitals, Urban
Humans
Life Support Care
Manitoba
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Time Factors
Abstract
Twenty Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) courses were conducted at the University of Manitoba between 1982 and 1987. There were 302 registrants, 95 of whom were from rural communities. Twelve registrants failed the course. The impact of the program was assessed by questionnaire (68.8% response overall). The response from department heads of surgery in urban hospitals was 87.5% and from surgeons in rural areas 50%. Fifty-eight percent of rural surgeons, 62.5% of urban surgeons and 75% of urban emergency-department directors claimed they could identify those who had attended an ATLS course by the increased confidence demonstrated and the use of more timely and appropriate consultation and treatment. Thirty percent of rural surgeons, 37% of urban surgeons and 42% of emergency-department directors claimed that mortality and morbidity were decreased when care was provided by ATLS-trained physicians. The remainder were undecided because of lack of information. Ninety-three percent of respondents indicated that the course increased their confidence, trauma capability and ability to communicate with consultant trauma surgeons. Fifty-two percent thought the course should be mandatory for all physicians, and 100% thought it should be mandatory for all emergency-department physicians. The data suggest that although most physicians treat fewer trauma patients 5 years after their ATLS training, the course is still highly recommended, and it has improved trauma care. Although the ATLS program was intended primarily for rural physicians, more urban-based physicians registered for it.
PubMed ID
8472232 View in PubMed
Less detail

Behavioral symptoms and the administration of psychotropic drugs to aged patients with dementia in nursing homes and in acute geriatric wards.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179741
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2004 Mar;16(1):61-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
K H Pitkala
J V Laurila
T E Strandberg
R S Tilvis
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Geriatric Clinic, Helsinki University Hospital, Finland. kaisu.pitkala@hus.fi
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2004 Mar;16(1):61-74
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Brain - pathology - physiopathology - radiography
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dementia - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Electroencephalography
Finland - epidemiology
Health Services for the Aged
Hospitalization
Hospitals, Urban
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Mental Disorders - drug therapy - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Neuropsychological Tests
Nursing Homes
Psychotropic Drugs - therapeutic use
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Abstract
To describe the prevalence of various psychiatric and behavioral symptoms among patients with dementia in nursing homes and acute geriatric wards and to investigate the administration of psychotropic medications to these patients.
425 consecutive patients (>70 years) in six acute geriatric wards in two city hospitals and seven nursing homes in Helsinki, Finland, were assessed with an extensive interview, cognitive tests, and attention tests. Of these, 255 were judged to have dementia according to the following information: previous dementia diagnoses and their adequacy, results of CT scans, Mini-mental State Examination (MMSE) tests, Clinical Dementia Scale (CDR) tests, and DSM-IV criteria. Psychiatric and behavioral symptoms were recorded over two weeks for each patient.
Psychiatric and behavioral symptoms were very common among patients with dementia in both settings. In all, 48% presented with psychotic symptoms (delusions, visual or auditory hallucinations, misidentifications or paranoid symptoms), 43% with depression, 26% agitation, and 26% apathy. Use of psychotropic drugs was also common: 87% were on at least one psychotropic drug, 66% took at least two, 36% at least three, and 11% four or more psychotropic drugs. Of the patients with dementia, 42% were on conventional antipsychotics, and 34% on anxiolytics despite their known side-effects. Only 13% were on atypical antipsychotics and 3% on cholinesterase inhibitors. The use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) was common (31%) among the patients. A surprising finding was that drugs with anticholinergic effects were also frequently (20%) used.
Both behavioural symptoms and use of psychotropic drugs are very common among dementia patients in institutional settings. The frequent use of potentially harmful drugs implies a need for education among physicians taking care of these patients.
PubMed ID
15190997 View in PubMed
Less detail

Downsizing in the public sector: Metro-Toronto's hospitals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181941
Source
J Health Organ Manag. 2003;17(6):438-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Douglas H Flint
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Administration, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, Canada.
Source
J Health Organ Manag. 2003;17(6):438-56
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Services Research
Hospital Administrators - psychology
Hospital Restructuring - organization & administration
Hospitals, Public - manpower - organization & administration
Hospitals, Urban - manpower - organization & administration
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Models, organizational
National health programs - organization & administration
Ontario
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - standards
Personnel Downsizing - methods - organization & administration
Private Sector
Public Sector
Questionnaires
Workload - economics
Abstract
This study has two objectives. First, to predict the outcomes of a public sector downsizing; second to measure effects of downsizing at organizational and inter-organizational levels. Primary data to assess the organizational level effects was collected through interviews with senior executives at two of Metro-Toronto's hospitals. Secondary data, to assess the inter-organizational effects, was collected from government documents and media reports. Due to the exploratory nature of the study's objectives a case study method was employed. Most institutional downsizing practices aligned with successful outcomes. Procedures involved at the inter-organizational level aligned with unsuccessful outcomes and negated organizational initiatives. This resulted in an overall alignment with unsuccessful procedures. The implication, based on private sector downsizings, is that the post-downsized hospital system was more costly and less effective.
PubMed ID
14730798 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effects of dialogue groups on physicians' work environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77929
Source
J Health Organ Manag. 2007;21(1):27-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Bergman David
Arnetz Bengt
Wahlström Rolf
Sandahl Christer
Author Affiliation
Medical Management Centre, Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. david.bergman@ki.se
Source
J Health Organ Manag. 2007;21(1):27-38
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Female
Group Processes
Health Promotion - methods
Health Services Research
Hospitals, Pediatric - manpower
Hospitals, Urban - manpower
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Male
Medical Staff, Hospital - psychology
Occupational Health
Organizational Culture
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital - manpower
Psychology, Industrial
Questionnaires
Sweden
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether dialogue groups for physicians can improve their psychosocial work environment. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: The study assessed the impact of eight dialogue groups, which involved 60 physicians at a children's clinic in one of the main hospitals in Stockholm. Psychosocial work environment measures were collected through a validated instrument sent to all physicians (n = 68) in 1999, 2001 and 2003. Follow-up data were collected after the termination of the groups. FINDINGS: The overall score of organizational and staff wellbeing, as assessed by the physicians at the clinic, deteriorated from 1999 until 2003 and then improved 2004. This shift in the trend coincided with the intervention. No other factors which might explain this shift could be identified. RESEARCH LIMITATIONS/IMPLICATIONS: In a naturalistic study of this kind it is not possible to prove any causal relationships. A controlled survey of management programmes concerning the work environment among physicians would be of interest for further research. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: The results suggest that dialogue groups may be one way to improve the psychosocial work environment for physicians. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: There is a lack of intervention studies regarding the efficacy of management programmes directed toward physicians, concerning the effects on professional and personal wellbeing. This is the first time dialogue groups have been studied within a health care setting.
PubMed ID
17455810 View in PubMed
Less detail

Experiences of inner strength in critically ill patients--a hermeneutical approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128176
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2012 Jun;28(3):150-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Lise-Merete Alpers
Sølvi Helseth
Ingegerd Bergbom
Author Affiliation
Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Sognsvannsveien 20, 0027 Oslo, Norway. lisemal@hotmail.com
Source
Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2012 Jun;28(3):150-8
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Critical Illness - nursing - psychology - therapy
Family Relations
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hospitals, Urban
Humans
Intensive Care Units
Interviews as Topic
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Nursing Assessment
Nursing Methodology Research
Power (Psychology)
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Resilience, Psychological
Respiration, Artificial - nursing - psychology
Self Concept
Social Support
Abstract
Becoming critically ill and in need of ventilator treatment is a considerable burden. Fear and anxiety are natural reactions and it is not uncommon for patients to experience hopelessness, withdrawal and depression. In situations like these the possession of inner strength can be of vital importance.
To gain knowledge on what factors contribute to inner strength in critically ill patients cared for in an intensive care unit. The depth interviews were conducted with six former ventilator-treated patients aged 60-72years.
The informants were recruited through the ICU at an urban hospital in Norway.
The study has an exploratory and descriptive design. A hermeneutic approach was used to interpret the data, in which Kvale's self-perception, critical common sense and theoretical levels were applied.
The study clearly demonstrates that there are certain factors that promote the inner strength of patients undergoing ventilator treatment. These are: "To have the support of next of kin", "The wish to go on living", "To be seen" and "Signs of progress". Amongst these patients it appears that the presence of one's next of kin has prime significance in promoting inner strength.
PubMed ID
22225817 View in PubMed
Less detail

Factors influencing rural versus metropolitan work choices for emergency physicians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149108
Source
Emerg Med Australas. 2009 Aug;21(4):323-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
Robert Meek
Steven Doherty
Adrienne Deans
Author Affiliation
Emergency Department, Dandenong Hospital, Victoria, Australia. robertmeek66@hotmail.com
Source
Emerg Med Australas. 2009 Aug;21(4):323-8
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Australasia
Emergency Medicine - education - manpower
Female
Hospitals, Rural - manpower
Hospitals, Urban - manpower
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Questionnaires
Abstract
To survey Fellows of the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine (FACEM) on how a range of factors influenced their decision to accept their most recent position. To compare this information between rural and metropolitan FACEM.
Analytical cross-sectional survey of FACEM. Sections included baseline demographics and a range of questions regarding the presence, absence and influence of 14 professional and 12 personal/external factors on the decision to accept their current position.
Questionnaires were returned by 498 (61.9%) of 805 FACEM. Eighty-seven (18.4%) were currently employed in rural areas. Rural FACEM were more likely to be male (odds ratio 2.0 [95% CI 1.1-3.9]) and to have worked for >12 months as a registrar in a rural hospital (odds ratio 4.5 [95% CI 2.2-9.1]). Negative influences for FACEM accepting rural positions included lack of access to continuing education, less acceptable on-call arrangements, fewer employment opportunities for their partner and less educational opportunities for their children. Positive influences included acceptable remuneration, desirable lifestyle, a higher indigenous caseload and more affordable housing.
The influence of different types of factors appears to differ between rural and metropolitan FACEM and this information might assist in the formulation of strategies aimed at increasing the rural workforce.
PubMed ID
19682019 View in PubMed
Less detail

Improving communication between hospital and community physicians. Feasibility study of a handwritten, faxed hospital discharge summary. Discharge Summary Study Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199832
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1999 Dec;45:2893-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999
Author
J M Paterson
R L Allega
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, St Joseph's Community Health Centre, Hamilton, ON. paterson@ices.on.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1999 Dec;45:2893-9
Date
Dec-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Continuity of Patient Care - organization & administration
Feasibility Studies
Follow-Up Studies
Handwriting
Hospitals, Teaching
Hospitals, Urban
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Medical Audit
Medical Records - standards
Medical Staff, Hospital - psychology
Ontario
Patient Discharge - standards
Physicians, Family - psychology
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Telefacsimile - organization & administration
Abstract
To assess the timing, legibility, and completeness of handwritten, faxed hospital discharge summaries as judged by family physicians and to obtain their opinion on the information categories on a standardized discharge summary form.
Fax survey of physicians for consecutive patients discharged from hospital over 8 weeks.
Three wards in a tertiary care teaching hospital.
One hundred two family physicians and general practitioners practising in Hamilton, Ont.
Proportions of summaries that were received, received within 48 hours of discharge, legible, and complete; types of information missing from incomplete summaries; proportion of physicians satisfied with the information categories.
Of 271 consecutive patient discharges, 195 (72%) were eligible for study. Among those ineligible, 22 patients (8%) did not have a family doctor identified on their hospital records. Among records that did have a family physician identified, fax numbers were unavailable or unknown for 54 physicians (20%). One hundred two physicians completed 166 discharge summary assessments for a response rate of 85% (166/195). By 3 weeks after discharge, 138 discharge summaries (83%) had been received by patients' family doctors. Among those received, 86% were received within 48 hours of discharge; 92% were legible; and 88% were complete. Hospital doctors' signatures, patients' diagnoses, and follow-up plans were most frequently missing. Ninety-five percent of physicians were satisfied with the information categories included on the standardized form.
Handwritten, faxed hospital discharge summaries were acceptable to family physicians for most patients. Criteria are needed for determining which patients require both handwritten and dictated discharge summaries.
Notes
Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 1989 Sep-Oct;4(5):453-62795267
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 1989 May;73(5 Pt 1):803-72704509
Cites: Health Bull (Edinb). 1970 Apr;28(2):75-804317620
Cites: J Med Syst. 1991 Jun;15(3):237-471804925
Cites: BMJ. 1988 Jul 2;297(6640):28-93408904
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1986 Nov 15;293(6557):1283-43096469
Cites: Med J Aust. 1992 Sep 21;157(6):380-21447986
Cites: BMJ. 1992 Oct 31;305(6861):1068-701467688
Cites: Ann R Coll Surg Engl. 1993 Mar;75(2):96-98476195
Cites: Am J Dis Child. 1993 Sep;147(9):986-88362819
Cites: BMJ. 1993 Oct 23;307(6911):10448251779
Cites: Ann R Coll Surg Engl. 1994 Jan;76(1 Suppl):8-108017801
Cites: CMAJ. 1995 May 1;152(9):1437-427728692
Cites: J R Coll Physicians Lond. 1995 Jul-Aug;29(4):307-107473325
Cites: Prof Nurse. 1996 Aug;11(11):764-68718323
Cites: J Accid Emerg Med. 1996 Nov;13(6):406-88947800
Cites: BMJ. 1996 Dec 21-28;313(7072):1657-88991021
Cites: Heart Lung. 1997 Mar-Apr;26(2):158-649090521
Cites: Proc AMIA Annu Fall Symp. 1997;:759-639357727
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 1998 Jan;44:62-99481464
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 1998 Jun;48(431):1307-119747547
Cites: Proc Annu Symp Comput Appl Med Care. 1991;:136-401807573
Cites: Br Med J. 1974 Nov 23;4(5942):456-94425921
PubMed ID
10626055 View in PubMed
Less detail

Improving the emergency department detection rate of domestic violence using direct questioning.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197844
Source
J Emerg Med. 2000 Aug;19(2):117-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
L J Morrison
R. Allan
A. Grunfeld
Author Affiliation
Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Emerg Med. 2000 Aug;19(2):117-24
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Communication
Domestic Violence - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Service, Hospital - standards - utilization
Female
Health Care Surveys
Hospitals, Urban
Humans
Incidence
Medical History Taking
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to compare the domestic violence (DV) rate identified with simple direct questioning to a historical cohort of patients receiving routine emergency department (ED) care. One thousand ED charts of female patients were retrospectively reviewed. Each patient in the prospective cohort was asked five DV specific questions. The historical cohort revealed a DV prevalence rate of 0.4%. The prospective study group of 302 patients identified 11 (3.6%) patients who admitted to acute DV on direct questioning. Ten of these patients accepted help. Twenty (6.6%) were identified as probable DV and 12 (4%) admitted to past violence. The total number of victims of DV, past, present, and probable was 43 (14.2%). This increase in detection from 0.4% (4/1000) to 14.2% (43/302) is significant at p
PubMed ID
10903457 View in PubMed
Less detail

Knee dislocations: experience at the Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181294
Source
Can J Surg. 2004 Feb;47(1):20-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Max Talbot
Greg Berry
Julio Fernandes
Pierre Ranger
Author Affiliation
Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Que.
Source
Can J Surg. 2004 Feb;47(1):20-4
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anterior Cruciate Ligament - injuries - surgery
Cohort Studies
Female
Hospitals, Urban
Humans
Knee Dislocation - etiology - rehabilitation - surgery
Knee Injuries - complications - diagnosis
Male
Middle Aged
Orthopedic Procedures - methods
Pain Measurement
Patient satisfaction
Physical Therapy Modalities - methods
Posterior Cruciate Ligament - injuries - surgery
Postoperative Care
Quebec
Questionnaires
Range of Motion, Articular - physiology
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures - methods
Recovery of Function
Retrospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Although many options exist for ligament reconstruction in knee dislocations, the optimal treatment remains controversial. Allografts and autografts have both been used to reconstruct the cruciate ligaments. We present the results of reconstruction using artificial ligaments at Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur in Montréal.
We reviewed the treatment of all patients with knee dislocations seen between June 1996 and October 1999. The Lysholm score, ACL-quality of life (QoL) questionnaire, physical examination and Telos instrumented laxity measurement were used to evaluate the results.
Twenty patients (21 knees) participated in the study. The mean (and standard deviation [SD]) Lysholm score was 71.7 (18). Results from the ACL-QoL questionnaire showed a global impairment in QoL. Mean (and SD) range of motion and flexion were 118 degrees (10.9 degrees) and 2 degrees (2.9 degrees) respectively. Mean (and SD) radiologic laxity evaluated with Telos for the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments were 6.1 (5.7) mm and 7.3 (4.5) mm respectively.
Knee reconstruction with artificial ligaments shows promise, but further studies are necessary before it can be recommended for widespread use. This is the first study to show specifically a severe impairment in QoL in this patient population.
Notes
Cites: Rev Chir Orthop Reparatrice Appar Mot. 1999 Nov;85(7):698-70710612134
Cites: Am J Sports Med. 1999 Mar-Apr;27(2):189-9610102100
Cites: Clin Sports Med. 2000 Jul;19(3):503-1810918963
Cites: Am J Knee Surg. 2001 Winter;14(1):33-811216717
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2001 Oct;83-A(10):1459-6911679594
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2002 Apr;84(3):356-6012002492
Cites: Am J Sports Med. 2002 Sep-Oct;30(5):718-2712239009
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Br. 1972 Feb;54(1):96-1025011750
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1977 Mar;59(2):236-9845209
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1979 Sep;(143):97-106389520
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1985 Sep;(198):43-94028566
Cites: Orthop Rev. 1991 Nov;20(11):995-10041749665
Cites: J Trauma. 1999 Apr;46(4):693-70110217236
Cites: Arthroscopy. 1999 May;15(4):422-3210355719
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1992 Nov;(284):203-71395294
Cites: Am J Knee Surg. 1995 Summer;8(3):97-1037552613
Cites: Am J Sports Med. 1995 Sep-Oct;23(5):580-78526274
Cites: Am J Knee Surg. 1995 Fall;8(4):168-808590129
Cites: Arthroscopy. 1996 Feb;12(1):5-148838723
Cites: Instr Course Lect. 1994;43:127-369097143
Cites: J Orthop Trauma. 1997 Oct;11(7):525-99334955
Cites: Am J Sports Med. 1997 Nov-Dec;25(6):769-789397264
Cites: Am J Sports Med. 1998 May-Jun;26(3):350-99617395
Cites: Clin Sports Med. 2000 Jul;19(3):387-9710918955
PubMed ID
14997920 View in PubMed
Less detail

Knowledge of heart disease and stroke among cardiology inpatients and outpatients in a Canadian inner-city urban hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138568
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2010 Dec;26(10):537-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Richard Gill
Chi-Ming Chow
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, USA.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2010 Dec;26(10):537-40
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Heart Diseases - prevention & control
Hospitals, Urban
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Primary Prevention
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Secondary Prevention
Stroke - prevention & control
Abstract
Heart disease and stroke are leading causes of death in North America. Nevertheless, in 2003, the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada reported that nearly two-thirds of Canadians have misconceptions regarding heart disease and stroke, echoing the results of similar American studies. Good knowledge of these conditions is imperative for cardiac patients who are at greater risk than the general population and should, therefore, be better educated. The present study evaluated the awareness of heart disease and stroke among cardiac patients to assess the efficacy of current education efforts.
Two hundred fifty-one cardiac inpatients and outpatients at St Michael's Hospital (Toronto, Ontario) were surveyed in July and August 2004. An unaided questionnaire assessed respondents' knowledge of cardiovascular risk factors, symptoms of heart attack and stroke, and actions in the event of cardiovascular emergency. Demographic data and relevant medical history were also obtained.
Cardiac patients demonstrated relatively adequate knowledge of heart attack warning symptoms. These patients also demonstrated adequate awareness of proper actions during cardiovascular emergencies. However, respondents were not aware of the most important risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Knowledge of stroke symptoms was also extremely poor. Socioeconomic status, and personal history of heart attack and stroke were positively correlated with good knowledge.
Future patient education efforts should address the awareness of the important cardiovascular risk factors and knowledge of cardiovascular warning symptoms (especially for stroke), as well as inform patients of appropriate actions during a cardiovascular emergency. Emphasis should be placed on primary and secondary prevention, and interventions should be directed toward low-income cardiac patients.
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2000;162(9 Suppl):S5-1110813022
Cites: J Community Health. 2000 Feb;25(1):47-6510706209
Cites: Neuroepidemiology. 2001 May;20(2):65-7611359072
Cites: Stroke. 2001 Aug;32(8):1926-3011486127
Cites: BMJ. 2002 May 4;324(7345):1065-811991910
Cites: Neurology. 2002 Nov 26;59(10):1547-5212451195
Cites: JAMA. 2003 Jan 15;289(3):343-612525235
Cites: Health Educ Monogr. 1977 Fall;5(3):215-30924795
Cites: Public Health Rep. 1981 Nov-Dec;96(6):514-227302105
Cites: J Health Soc Behav. 1995;Spec No:80-947560851
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1995 Dec 14;333(24):1581-77477192
Cites: Curr Opin Neurol. 1996 Feb;9(1):46-528722664
Cites: Heart Lung. 1997 Mar-Apr;26(2):92-89090513
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1998 Nov 23;158(21):2329-389827784
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2005 Dec 6;143(11):785-9216330789
Cites: Prev Med. 2006 Mar;42(3):235-916460789
Cites: JAMA. 2006 Oct 11;296(14):1749-5617032988
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2008 Aug;24(8):623-818685742
Cites: Stroke. 2000 Jun;31(6):1230-310835437
PubMed ID
21165363 View in PubMed
Less detail

31 records – page 1 of 4.