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23 records – page 1 of 3.

Cause-specific mortality in Finnish forensic psychiatric patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301165
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2018 Jul; 72(5):374-379
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-2018
Author
Ilkka Ojansuu
Hanna Putkonen
Jari Tiihonen
Author Affiliation
a Kuopio University Hospital , Kuopio , Finland.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2018 Jul; 72(5):374-379
Date
Jul-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cause of Death - trends
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Forensic Psychiatry - methods - trends
Homicide - psychology - trends
Hospitals, Psychiatric - trends
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - mortality - psychology
Middle Aged
Suicide - psychology - trends
Young Adult
Abstract
To analyze the causes of mortality among patients committed to compulsory forensic psychiatric hospital treatment in Finland during 1980-2009 by categorizing the causes of mortality into somatic diseases, suicides and other unnatural deaths.
The causes of mortality were analyzed among 351 patients who died during the follow-up. Standardized mortality ratio (SMR) was calculated as the ratio of observed and expected number of deaths by using the subject-years methods with 95% confidence intervals, assuming a Poisson distribution. The expected number of deaths was calculated on the basis of sex-, age- and calendar-period-specific mortality rates for the Finnish population.
The vast majority (249/351) of deaths were due to a somatic disease with SMR of 2.6 (mean age at death 61 years). Fifty nine patients committed suicide with a SMR of 7.1 (mean age at death 40 years). Four patients were homicide victims (mean age at death 40 years) and 32 deaths were accidental (mean age at death 52 years). The combined homicides and accidental deaths resulted in a SMR of 1.7.
The results of this study point out that the high risk for suicide should receive attention when the hospital treatment and the outpatient care is being organized for forensic psychiatric patients. In addition, the risk of accidents should be evaluated and it should be assured that the patients receive proper somatic healthcare during the forensic psychiatric treatment and that it continues also in the outpatient setting.
PubMed ID
29720022 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changing patterns of psychiatric morbidity in Saskatchewan.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248871
Source
Can Ment Health. 1978 Mar;26(1):6-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1978

Clinical and human resource planning for the downsizing of psychiatric hospitals: the British Columbia experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208949
Source
Psychiatr Q. 1997;68(1):25-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
D. Macfarlane
P. Fortin
J. Fox
S. Gundry
J. Oshry
E. Warren
Author Affiliation
Riverview Hospital, Port Coquitlam, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Psychiatr Q. 1997;68(1):25-42
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Community Mental Health Services - trends
Deinstitutionalization - trends
Forecasting
Health Facility Size - trends
Health Resources - trends
Health Services Needs and Demand - trends
Hospital Planning - trends
Hospital Restructuring - trends
Hospitals, Psychiatric - trends
Humans
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation
Patient Care Team - trends
Abstract
Riverview Hospital, B.C.'s only and Canada's largest remaining provincial psychiatric hospital began a formal planned "downsizing" process in 1992. This initiative was an important element in the Province's strategic plan to shift to a more community-focused mental health system and to bring tertiary psychiatric services "closer to home" by redeveloping Riverview Hospital on three sites. The paper summarizes the literature pertaining to the "downsizing" of psychiatric hospital services in relation both to clinical and human resource planning. It describes the mental health system in B.C. and the service system context in which this exercise is occurring. It is based on the first three years of experience in identifying the major challenges and the strategies developed to meet these challenges. It draws some conclusions about the effectiveness of these strategies and it speculates about the likely future challenges as the "downsizing" process continues.
PubMed ID
9021839 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Clinical nursing and nursing administration. 4. Psychiatric nursing has developed into a dynamic effort].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246068
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1980 Feb 20;80(8):12-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-20-1980
Author
E. Larsen
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1980 Feb 20;80(8):12-6
Date
Feb-20-1980
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Custodial Care
Denmark
Hospitals, Psychiatric - trends
Humans
Psychiatric Nursing - trends
Psychotherapy
PubMed ID
6899582 View in PubMed
Less detail

Designation of Alberta psychiatric units changes for 1985 or 1986?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238894
Source
AARN News Lett. 1985 May;41(5):11-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1985
Author
B. Grever
Source
AARN News Lett. 1985 May;41(5):11-2
Date
May-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Hospitals, Psychiatric - trends
Humans
Mental Health Services - trends
PubMed ID
3846417 View in PubMed
Less detail

From psychiatric hospital to rehabilitation: the Nordic experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195084
Source
Encephale. 2000 Oct;26 Spec No 1:3-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
P. Munk-Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatric Demography, Institute for Basic Psychiatric Research, Psychiatric Hospital in Aarhus, Aarhus University Hospital, DK-8240 Risskov, Denmark.
Source
Encephale. 2000 Oct;26 Spec No 1:3-6
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Deinstitutionalization - trends
Female
Forecasting
Hospitals, Psychiatric - trends
Humans
Incidence
Long-Term Care - trends
Male
Patient Readmission - trends
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Schizophrenia - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Social Work, Psychiatric - trends
Abstract
Deinstitutionalization and decentralization in psychiatry have by now been the first items of the agenda for more than 30 years. A theory of social psychiatry with social rehabilitation and reintegration was the underlying basis for the activities which should make the change from mainly inpatients to community-based outpatients treatment possible. By means of the National Danish Psychiatric Case Register this paper shows how the process mostly has concentrated on the deinstitutionalization (or reinstitutionalization?) of the old long-stay psychiatric patients. A new but smaller group of long-stay patients has appeared in the statistics. The average age of this group is 40 years compared to the old long-stay patients' average age of 60 years. It is also shown that the readmission rate during the first year after the discharge following the hospitalization during which the schizophrenia diagnosis was given for the first time ever is almost unchanged (with a small increase) for both males and females. So, in Denmark it is on average between 45% and 50% for females and males respectively. A break down on these data on counties shows that the situation varies broadly from a little over 30% for the best (mainly rural counties) to a maximum of 54%. It seems as if social psychiatry in the Nordic countries mainly concentrate on social care and only to a less degree on network, employment and other basic rehabilitation and reintegrative social work. A basis for a successful social integrative work must be a treatment initiated as early as possible with an antipsychotic treatment and maximum of compliance.
PubMed ID
11294059 View in PubMed
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[Mental health care--and the unused resources].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233620
Source
Sykepleien. 1988 Jan 7;76(1):14-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-7-1988

Mental health statistics, 1982-83 to 1993-94.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213513
Source
Health Rep. 1996;7(4):55-61, 59-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
J. Randhawa
R. Riley
Author Affiliation
Health Statistics Division, Statistics Canada, Ottawa.
Source
Health Rep. 1996;7(4):55-61, 59-65
Date
1996
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data - trends
Hospitals, General - trends - utilization
Hospitals, Psychiatric - trends - utilization
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Mental Disorders - classification - epidemiology - therapy
Sex Distribution
Abstract
The shift toward greater use of general hospitals for the treatment of mental disorders reflects the tendency to admit patients with the most serious diagnoses to psychiatric hospitals. However, admissions to both types of institution now tend to involve more serious cases than in early 1980s. To some extent, the increase in the number of patient-days provided for mental disorders, despite declining separation rates, is attributable to the time required for the treatment of disorders such as schizophrenia and affective psychoses. There is also growing emphasis on community care. Increasingly, mental disorders are treated on an outpatient basis without admission to hospital. The substantial annual fluctuations in the national number of separations-as many as 5,000 or 6,000 from one year to the next-may be due to the development of alternative facilities such as community health clinics. The opening of such a facility in one province could have noticeable impact on national figures on hospitalization for mental disorders.
PubMed ID
8679958 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Mental health system. Psychiatric hospitals--do we need them?. Interview by Bjørn Arild Ostby].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232787
Source
Sykepleien. 1988 Jul 7;76(13):12-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-7-1988

23 records – page 1 of 3.