Skip header and navigation

Refine By

56 records – page 1 of 6.

Advocacy for patients: are outsiders necessary? A psychiatric hospital perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234333
Source
Health Law Can. 1988;8(4):108-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988

Assessing quality in the "soft services".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235206
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1987 May;64(4):38-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1987

Auditing dietetic services in a psychiatric facility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244357
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1981 Jul;58(7):16-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1981

The Clarke Institute experience with electroconvulsive therapy: II. Treatment evaluation and standards of practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239810
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1984 Dec;29(8):652-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1984
Author
B A Martin
P M Kramer
D. Day
A M Peter
H B Kedward
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1984 Dec;29(8):652-7
Date
Dec-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Affective Disorders, Psychotic - therapy
Depressive Disorder - therapy
Electroconvulsive Therapy - standards
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitals, Psychiatric - standards
Humans
Mental Disorders - therapy
Ontario
Schizophrenia - therapy
Abstract
Contemporary standards of practice of electroconvulsive therapy with respect to the treatment procedure, clinical indications, and dosage (number of treatments per course) are summarized. The actual clinical practice at one psychiatric hospital over a 16-year period, comprising 22,647 treatments, was compared to those standards. The most significant findings in this series were the over-representation of patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia and the absence of any clinically significant difference in the treatment dosage for schizophrenia and affective disorders. The significance of these findings is discussed with respect to their identification of patient subgroups that warrant case auditing. In addition, the results are used as a basis for a critical examination of the rationale for the presently recommended maximum treatment dosages.
PubMed ID
6518437 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison of user assessed needs for care between psychiatric inpatients and supported community residents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71501
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2002 Dec;16(4):406-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
D. Brunt
L. Hansson
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University, Sweden. david.brunt@ivosa.vxu.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2002 Dec;16(4):406-13
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Comparative Study
Deinstitutionalization
Female
Halfway Houses - standards
Health Services Research
Hospitals, Psychiatric - standards
Humans
Inpatients - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment - organization & administration
Outpatients - psychology
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Residential Treatment - standards
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to compare user assessed needs for care for psychiatric patients in inpatient settings with that of residents in supported community residences. The Camberwell Assessment of Need was administered to 75 patients and residents in different housing settings. Residents in supported community settings had more needs for care (8.1), than patients in inpatient settings (5.8), partly because of differences in duration of illness. A greater proportion of those living in supported community residences reported needs in the areas of psychotic symptoms, accommodation, food, daytime activities, sexual expression and looking after the home. There were no differences in numbers of unmet needs. Relatives and friends provided emotional and social support predominantly in the areas of company and psychological distress. In conclusion, living in supported community residences does not imply more unmet needs, or less adequate response to needs from services, despite a greater number of needs being reported. In some areas of need, relatives and friends play an important role in the provision of support.
PubMed ID
12445111 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Continuing shortage of personnel in LĂ„ngbro. Insecurity nourishes violence].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236270
Source
Vardfacket. 1986 Nov 27;10(21):40-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-27-1986
Author
M. Trozell
Source
Vardfacket. 1986 Nov 27;10(21):40-2
Date
Nov-27-1986
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Hospitals, Psychiatric - standards
Humans
Personnel, Hospital - supply & distribution
Security Measures
Sweden
Violence
PubMed ID
3649144 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Data collection methods and results in user surveys in mental health care]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82088
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 May 25;126(11):1481-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-25-2006
Author
Bjertnaes Øyvind Andresen
Garratt Andrew
Johannessen Jan Olav
Author Affiliation
Nasjonalt kunnskapssenter for helsetjenesten, Postboks 7004 St. Olavs plass, 0130 Oslo. oyvind.andresen.bjertnes@kunnskapssenteret.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 May 25;126(11):1481-3
Date
May-25-2006
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Community Mental Health Services - standards
Data Collection - methods
Female
Hospitals, Psychiatric - standards
Humans
Inpatients
Male
Norway
Outpatients
Patient Discharge
Patient satisfaction
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Questionnaires
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Questionnaires on patient experience are increasingly used as quality indicators in the health services. There is limited evidence relating to alternative approaches to surveying patients within this field. We wanted to assess the effect of different methods of data collection on response rates and scores produced by a self-administered questionnaire on patient experience for adult inpatients receiving mental health care. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Data were collected from adult inpatients treated at three community mental health centres affiliated with the psychiatric clinic at Stavanger University hospital in spring 2005. The inclusion period was nine weeks, with three designs at consecutive time periods: A, a postal survey following discharge; B, a clinical survey before discharge; and C, patients given the choice of A or B. RESULTS: The response rate was highest with the postal design (38% vs. 24% and 23% respectively), but the differences were related to one additional reminder in the postal design. Out of the 11 questions, 4 had significantly poorer scores for the postal design. Questionnaire scores were significantly poorer with the postal design; 50 (on a scale from 0 to 100), vs. 59 and 63 in design B and C respectively. INTERPRETATION: The choice of data collection methods influences the results in user surveys in mental health care. This is an important consideration in the planning of studies and in the interpretation of the results, and in the comparison of results between studies using different data collection methods.
PubMed ID
16732343 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Diet and physical activity in Norwegian psychiatric institutions]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49568
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Dec 1;125(23):3297-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-2005
Author
Maria Hjort Thommessen
Egil W Martinsen
Gunn Helene Arsky
Author Affiliation
NutriCom AS, Grefsenveien 49, Postboks 37 Grefsen, 0409 Oslo. maria@nutricom.net
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Dec 1;125(23):3297-9
Date
Dec-1-2005
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Diet - standards
Diet Surveys
English Abstract
Exercise
Female
Food Service, Hospital - standards
Hospitals, Psychiatric - standards
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - drug therapy
Middle Aged
Norway
Obesity - chemically induced - etiology - prevention & control
Overweight - drug effects
Patient Education
Psychotropic Drugs - adverse effects
Weight Gain - drug effects
Abstract
The food served in psychiatric institutions may in general be described as a standard diet similar to that served in somatic hospitals, with no or little adjustment made to the special needs of the individual psychiatric patient. The emphasis on physical activity is also generally low. This paper presents results and strategies in a sample of sixteen Norwegian psychiatric institutions that have undertaken a one-year weight management programme with focus on structural changes in dietary and physical activity practices. Prevention and treatment of weight gain in psychiatric patients is difficult, but not impossible. All institutions included in this project have made changes in the dietary practice and the routines for physical activity, with less severe weight problems in the patients as a result. Coordinated approaches are necessary if the efforts are to succeed.
PubMed ID
16327859 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Do nurses manage nursing care in the wards?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240411
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1984 Jun 13;84(24):15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-13-1984

The Drinking Motives Questionnaire among Swedish psychiatric patients: An exploration of the four-factor structure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290137
Source
Drug Alcohol Rev. 2017 05; 36(3):400-407
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
05-2017
Author
Caisa Öster
Hans Arinell
Christina Nehlin
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Uppsala University, Sweden.
Source
Drug Alcohol Rev. 2017 05; 36(3):400-407
Date
05-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Hospitals, Psychiatric - standards
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Motivation
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital - standards
Surveys and Questionnaires - standards
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Alcohol use above hazardous limits is common among persons with psychiatric disorders, and there is limited knowledge about motives for drinking. The objective of this study was to explore the adequacy of the four-factor structure of drinking motives in an adult psychiatric outpatient population in Sweden by confirming the factor structure in the Drinking Motives Questionnaire (DMQ-R) and in alternative models.
In total, 371 patients responded to the DMQ-R along with the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT). AUDIT was used to assess frequency of alcohol consumption, number of drinks consumed on a typical occasion and binge drinking frequency. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to examine the construct validity of the DMQ-R and alternative models, including the short form, DMQ-R SF.
Fit statistics suggested that the original four-factor model had questionable fit (root mean square error of approximation [RMSEA]?=?0.10, comparative fit index [CFI]?=?0.89, standardised root mean square residual [SRMR]?=?0.08). The model with the best fit indices was the DMQ-R SF (RMSEA?=?0.07, CFI?=?0.97, SRMR?=?0.04). When using DMQ-R SF in further analyses enhancement, the most strongly endorsed motives were related to quantity and AUDIT sum score. Coping motives were most strongly related to AUDIT sum score, frequency and binge drinking. Social motives were only related to binge drinking, whereas conformity motives were not statistically associated with any motives.
The study implies that the 12-item short form, DMQ-R SF, could be more appropriate than the original DMQ-R in this group. [Öster C, Arinell H, Nehlin C. The Drinking Motives Questionnaire among Swedish psychiatric patients: An exploration of the four-factor structure. Drug Alcohol Rev 2017;36:400-407].
PubMed ID
27288296 View in PubMed
Less detail

56 records – page 1 of 6.