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Evaluation of a peer-reviewed career development and compensation program for physicians at an academic health science center.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187165
Source
Pediatrics. 2003 Jan;111(1):e26-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Hugh O'Brodovich
Ramune Pleinys
Ronald Laxer
Susan Tallett
Norman Rosenblum
Christina Sass-Kortsak
Author Affiliation
Paediatric Consultants Partnership, Department of Paediatrics, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. hugh.obrodovich@sickkids.ca
Source
Pediatrics. 2003 Jan;111(1):e26-31
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers - manpower - organization & administration
Attitude of Health Personnel
Benchmarking
Career Mobility
Employee Performance Appraisal
Focus Groups
Hospitals, Pediatric - manpower - organization & administration
Humans
Job Description
Job Satisfaction
Medical Staff, Hospital - psychology
Ontario
Pediatrics - standards
Peer Review
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Staff Development
Abstract
The Department of Pediatrics at the Hospital for Sick Children, which is funded by an alternative payment plan, has implemented a novel career development and compensation program (CDCP). Job activity profiles were used to more clearly define job expectations, benchmarks guided career development, and peer review was used to assess performance. The objective of this study was to evaluate the departmental pediatricians' satisfaction with the CDCP.
Pediatricians, all of whom had undergone CDCP annual reviews, could participate if they had undergone the in-depth triennial CDCP review. Each received a 5-point Likert scale-based questionnaire that asked how well the CDCP had conformed to the principles identified by the department during the development of the CDCP. Anonymous, confidential responses were collated and used to guide focus groups that discussed areas of greatest concern and attempted to identify solutions. Focus groups were led by external facilitators who were experienced in qualitative research. They audiotaped the sessions, transcribed the comments, and analyzed the data with the assistance of a qualitative analysis application.
Sixty of the eligible 88 pediatricians participated, and 74% of their responses were that the CDCP had addressed the original principles "somewhat," "to a great extent," or "extremely well." The remainder indicated that some of the principles were either "not addressed" or "only to a small extent" by the CDCP. Results from the 11 focus groups (46 participants) indicated that the CDCP was an improvement over the previous method of career development and determination of the rate of remuneration. Most were also still in agreement with the purpose and design principles. Although they did not want the CDCP to undergo a major redesign, they identified areas that need improvement. Short-, medium-, and long-term action plans to address these areas are under way.
Pediatricians at the health science center of the Hospital for Sick Children remain supportive of the CDCP.
PubMed ID
12509591 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of a staff-only hospitalist system in a tertiary care, academic children's hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177134
Source
Pediatrics. 2004 Dec;114(6):1545-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Prabo Dwight
Colin MacArthur
Jeremy N Friedman
Patricia C Parkin
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Pediatrics. 2004 Dec;114(6):1545-9
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Hospital Mortality
Hospitalists
Hospitals, Pediatric - manpower - organization & administration
Hospitals, Teaching - manpower - organization & administration
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Linear Models
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Medical Staff, Hospital
Ontario
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Pediatrics - manpower
Abstract
The staff/housestaff hospitalist system has been evaluated in 2 pediatric centers in the United States. In Canada, fewer residents and duty hour restrictions led to the development of a staff-only hospitalist system. The objective of this study was to compare the staff-only pediatric hospitalist system and the staff/housestaff hospitalist system with respect to traditional outcome measures.
This cohort study (staff-only hospitalist system versus staff/housestaff system) used electronic health records data (July 1, 1996, to June 30, 1997) for all admissions (n = 3807) to the general pediatric inpatient unit of an urban, tertiary care, pediatric, teaching hospital in Toronto, Canada. Outcome measures included length of hospital stay, subspecialty consultations, readmission to the hospital, and death during the hospital stay.
The median length of hospital stay was reduced by 14% for patients admitted to the staff-only hospitalist system, compared with the staff/housestaff hospitalist system (2.5 and 2.9 days, respectively). This difference remained statistically significant after adjustment for age, gender, and comorbidity. There were no significant differences between the 2 models of care with respect to subspecialty consultation, hospital readmission, or mortality rates. A stratified analysis showed similar findings for the 10 most frequent diagnostic groups.
The staff-only hospitalist system was associated with a significant reduction in the hospital length of stay, without evidence of adverse effects on mortality or readmission rates, compared with the staff/hospitalist system. In the context of recent restrictions on resident duty hours in the United States, these findings may be of interest to pediatric teaching hospitals considering the development of a similar staff-only hospitalist model.
PubMed ID
15574613 View in PubMed
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The role of nurse understaffing in nosocomial viral gastrointestinal infections on a general pediatrics ward.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190827
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2002 Mar;23(3):133-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2002
Author
Jacob Stegenga
Erica Bell
Anne Matlow
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2002 Mar;23(3):133-6
Date
Mar-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Cross Infection - epidemiology - transmission - virology
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Gastroenteritis - epidemiology - virology
Hospital Units
Hospitals, Pediatric - manpower - organization & administration
Humans
Nursing Staff, Hospital - supply & distribution
Ontario - epidemiology
Pediatrics
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Virus Diseases - epidemiology - transmission
Abstract
To examine the relationship between nurse staffing levels and the rate of nosocomial viral gastrointestinal infections (NVGIs) in a general pediatrics population.
Retrospective descriptive study.
A general pediatrics ward at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, a 320-bed, tertiary-care pediatric institution.
Forty-three NVGIs were detected in 37 patients of 2,929 admissions (1.3%). The monthly NVGI rate correlated significantly with the monthly night patient-to-nurse ratio (r = 0.56) and the monthly day patient-to-nurse ratio (r = 0.50). The nursing hours per patient-day during the preinfection period (PIP) were significantly lower than those during the nonpreinfection period (NPIP; 12.5 vs 13.0). There was no difference between the PIP and the NPIP day patient-to-nurse ratios (3.31 vs 3.32), but there was a significant difference between the PIP and the NPIP night patient-to-nurse ratios (3.26 vs 3.16). The incidence of NVGIs in the 72-hour period after any day when the nursing hours per patient-day were less than 10.5 was 6.39 infections per 1,000 patient-days, compared with 2.17 infections per 1,000 patient-days in periods with more than 10.5 nursing hours per patient-day (rate ratio, 2.94; 95% confidence interval, 2.16 to 4.01).
Nurse understaffing contributed to an increased NVGI rate in our general pediatrics population, and should be assessed as a risk factor in outbreak investigations.
PubMed ID
11918117 View in PubMed
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Survey of nursing research programs in children's hospitals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220982
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 1993 Jun;8(3):159-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1993
Author
B. Davies
B. Eng
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia School of Nursing, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 1993 Jun;8(3):159-66
Date
Jun-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Nursing Research - manpower - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Hospital Bed Capacity
Hospitals, Pediatric - manpower - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Questionnaires
Research Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Research Support as Topic - statistics & numerical data
United States
Abstract
Available published literature describing successfully implemented research programs is relatively limited, particularly within children's hospitals. In order to determine the status of research program development within children's hospitals, a mailed survey was sent to 108 free-standing children's hospitals in the United States and Canada. The questionnaire was comprised of questions pertaining to five general sections: (a) institutional demographics; (b) organizational structure for research; (c) research activities; (d) relationship to other agency research; and (e) demographic characteristics of the individual completing the survey. Findings indicated that nursing research within children's hospitals is in an early development state, but that it is recognized as a necessary and credible component of nursing. Differences were noted between the groups of hospitals with the most research activity and those with no research activity. Hospitals were in various stages of research development, a sequential process characterized by a sequential pattern comprised of two phases.
PubMed ID
8340881 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.