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24 records – page 1 of 3.

[25th anniversary of the Moscow Children's Psychiatric Hospital No. 6].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236035
Source
Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1987;87(10):1557-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987

[75 years of service to children: l'Hôpital de Montréal pour enfants].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247287
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1979 Apr 21;120(8):1012-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-21-1979

100 years of pediatric surgery in Stockholm, with personal memories from the last 50 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60241
Source
Prog Pediatr Surg. 1986;20:17-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986
Author
T. Ehrenpreis
Source
Prog Pediatr Surg. 1986;20:17-33
Date
1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
England
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Hospitals, Pediatric - history
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Newborn, Diseases - surgery
Pediatrics - history
Portraits
Societies, Medical - history
Surgery - history
Sweden
Abstract
The first children's hospital in Sweden (Kronprinsessan Lovisa's Children's Hospital) was established in Stockholm in 1854. In 1885 it was divided into a medical and a surgical department. This constituted the birth of pediatric surgery in Sweden. Pediatric surgery has been included in undergraduate teaching programs since 1945. A personal Associate Professorate in Pediatric Urology was instituted at the Karolinska Medical School in Stockholm for N. O. Ericsson in the late fifties. Upon his retirement in 1976 this personal chair was converted into an established Professorship in Pediatric Surgery. Pediatric surgery has been recognized as a specialty by our Medical Association since 1947. A survey of the Annual Reports from the Lovisa Hospital from 1885 to 1969 shows three phases in the development of our specialty in Sweden. The first stage extends from 1885 to 1932. During this period the disease pattern was dominated by septic and tuberculous infections, by empyemas, and by ENT diseases. Few cases of congenital malformations were reported. The bulk of general surgery in childhood was performed in the departments of general surgery. The second stage (1932-1945) was characterized by a decreasing incidence of tuberculous infections, by a successive transfer of orthopedic and ENT patients to the Departments of Orthopedic and ENT surgery respectively. During this period, a marked increase occurred in the volume of malformation surgery. This was due to the centralized treatment of congenital anomalies. The third stage started in 1945. The war had ended and we became acquainted with the dramatic development of pediatric surgery in other countries, in particular in the USA. The main advance was the possibility of opening the chest for repair of congenital anomalies of the heart and the great vessels, of the esophagus, and of the diaphragm. Soon afterwards, rectosigmoidectomy was introduced for the treatment of Hirschsprung's disease. In 1952, a second department of pediatric surgery was opened in Stockholm as a part of a new Children's Clinic at the Karolinska University Hospital. The major part of general surgery from the Stockholm area and all of the cardiovascular surgery stayed with the "Lovisa Hospital", while the major part of neonatal surgery and specific abdominal surgery was performed at the Karolinska Hospital. In order to improve the rather underdeveloped situation of pediatric urology, N. O. Ericsson was appointed to the post of Associate Head of the Karolinska Department, soon bringing this field to the frontlines of international standards. This historical review ends with some of the author's personal memories from the last 50 years.
PubMed ID
3095872 View in PubMed
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Alan Conn; his role in the development of the anesthesia department at Toronto SickKids.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113680
Source
Paediatr Anaesth. 2013 Jul;23(7):667-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Robert E Creighton
Ian A Jeremy Sloan
David J Steward
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesia, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Paediatr Anaesth. 2013 Jul;23(7):667-9
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesia Department, Hospital - history
Anesthesiology - education - history
Child
History, 20th Century
Hospitals, Pediatric - history
Humans
Ontario
Pediatrics - history
Perioperative Care
Respiration, Artificial
PubMed ID
23700984 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changing attitudes towards families of hospitalized children from 1935 to 1975: a case study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222644
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1992 Dec;17(12):1422-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1992
Author
J. Young
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1992 Dec;17(12):1422-9
Date
Dec-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Child
Child, Hospitalized
Child, Preschool
History, 20th Century
Hospitals, Pediatric - history - organization & administration
Humans
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - history - psychology
Ontario
Organizational Policy
Pediatric Nursing - history
Professional-Family Relations
Visitors to Patients
Abstract
The introduction of 'open' visiting and family involvement in the care of hospitalized children created a revolution in the care of children in hospitals. This historical study utilized the situation at the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (HSC), as a case study illustrating change. Although psychological research provided a strong rationale for including families in the care of hospitalized children, change occurred slowly. In this regard, HSC was typical of many children's hospitals. However, there seemed to be a significant failure to learn from innovations elsewhere. Paediatric nurses, in particular, were slow to encourage family visiting and participation in care.
PubMed ID
1474240 View in PubMed
Less detail

Designing for "the little convalescents": children's hospitals in Toronto and Montreal, 1875-2006.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190564
Source
Can Bull Med Hist. 2002;19(1):201-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Annmarie Adams
David Theodore
Author Affiliation
School of Architecture, McGill University.
Source
Can Bull Med Hist. 2002;19(1):201-43
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Architecture as Topic - history
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Hospital Design and Construction - history
Hospitals, Pediatric - history
Hospitals, Urban - history
Humans
Abstract
This paper explores more than a century of changing ideas about the health of Canadian children through the architecture of pediatric hospitals in Montreal and Toronto. As a unique source in the history of medicine, hospital architecture reveals three distinct phases in the construction of children as patients. Early 20th-century children's hospitals remained bastions of older spatial attitudes towards health. The postwar hospital was self-consciously modern, with an arrangement more scientific and institutional than its predecessor. Through reference to other typologies, the postmodern hospital marks a curious return to the earlier attitude that children's health is a family affair. Is the hospital a home for children or an institution for science?
PubMed ID
11958196 View in PubMed
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[Drops of milk and thirst for power: the under side of the struggle against infant mortality in Montreal, 1910-1953].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192884
Source
Can Bull Med Hist. 1998;15(1):27-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
D. Baillargeon
Author Affiliation
Département d'histoire, Université de Montréal, Québec.
Source
Can Bull Med Hist. 1998;15(1):27-57
Date
1998
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child, Preschool
History, 20th Century
Hospitals, Pediatric - history
Humans
Infant
Infant Care - history
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Politics
Abstract
This study discusses the development of the network of baby clinics in francophone Montreal, beginning in the 1910s, which were to be the source of serious conflicts between various advocates, namely, groups of priests and physicians, members of the Saint-Jean-Baptiste National Federation, and municipal government. Child-saving, a fitting nationalist project to bring together elites in the same cause, instead degenerated into a power struggle. Conceived in different terms and after the various political ambitions of the parties became irreconciliable, the organization for the battle against infant mortality in Montreal proved to be a powerful reflection of the discords which separated those who were concerned about the future of the nation and those with ambitions for their personal advancement.
PubMed ID
11623891 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Edward Welander helped the children with syphilis to have a chance of life and health]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33630
Source
Lakartidningen. 1998 Sep 30;95(40):4382-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-30-1998

[Elizaveta Aleksandrovna Osipova (on the centenary of her birth)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231829
Source
Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1989;89(11):127-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989

24 records – page 1 of 3.