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Neurodevelopmental outcomes after open heart operations before 3 months of age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124864
Source
Ann Thorac Surg. 2012 May;93(5):1577-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Renée Sananes
Cedric Manlhiot
Edmond Kelly
Lisa K Hornberger
William G Williams
Daune MacGregor
Raymond Buncic
Brian W McCrindle
Author Affiliation
Labatt Family Heart Centre and Division of Neurology, Department of Paediatrics, Surgery and Critical Care Medicine, The University of Toronto, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. renee.sananes@sickkids.ca
Source
Ann Thorac Surg. 2012 May;93(5):1577-83
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Analysis of Variance
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - adverse effects - methods
Cardiopulmonary Bypass - adverse effects - methods
Child Development - physiology
Cohort Studies
Developmental Disabilities - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Defects, Congenital - diagnosis - mortality - surgery
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Intellectual Disability - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Male
Motor Skills Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Neuropsychological Tests
Ontario
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Survival Rate
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to monitor developmental progress and identify predictors of developmental outcomes at 2 years after operation in infants who underwent a surgical procedure with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) at less than 3 months of age.
Patients (N=131 enrolled; N=106 assessed) less than 3 months of age at the time of cardiac operation were prospectively enrolled (years 1999-2003) and assessed at 8, 12, and 24 months after operation. Patients with preexisting conditions independently associated with poor neurodevelopmental outcomes were excluded. Fine and gross motor development was formally assessed at all 3 visits, and parent ratings of development across several domains were obtained. Neurodevelopment was formally assessed at 24 months of age using the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, 2nd edition (BSID-II) Mental Development Index score (MDI).
Significant gross motor difficulties were identified at 8 months of age (p
Notes
Comment In: Ann Thorac Surg. 2012 May;93(5):158322541189
PubMed ID
22541188 View in PubMed
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Risk, clinical features, and outcomes of thrombosis associated with pediatric cardiac surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131380
Source
Circulation. 2011 Oct 4;124(14):1511-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-4-2011
Author
Cedric Manlhiot
Ines B Menjak
Leonardo R Brandão
Colleen E Gruenwald
Steven M Schwartz
V Ben Sivarajan
Hyaemin Yoon
Robert Maratta
Caitlin L Carew
Janet A McMullen
Nadia A Clarizia
Helen M Holtby
Suzan Williams
Christopher A Caldarone
Glen S Van Arsdell
Anthony K Chan
Brian W McCrindle
Author Affiliation
The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 1X8.
Source
Circulation. 2011 Oct 4;124(14):1511-9
Date
Oct-4-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cardiac Surgical Procedures
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Heart Defects, Congenital - surgery
Hospitals, Pediatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology - etiology
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Risk
Survival Analysis
Thrombosis - epidemiology - etiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Thrombosis, usually considered a serious but rare complication of pediatric cardiac surgery, has not been a major clinical and/or research focus in the past.
We noted 444 thrombi (66% occlusive, 60% symptomatic) in 171 of 1542 surgeries (11%). Factors associated with increased odds of thrombosis were age
PubMed ID
21911785 View in PubMed
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Safety of intravenous immunoglobulin in the treatment of juvenile dermatomyositis: adverse reactions are associated with immunoglobulin A content.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158627
Source
Pediatrics. 2008 Mar;121(3):e626-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Cedric Manlhiot
Pascal N Tyrrell
Lisa Liang
Adelle R Atkinson
Wendy Lau
Brian M Feldman
Author Affiliation
Division of Rheumatology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Toronto, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Pediatrics. 2008 Mar;121(3):e626-30
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Ambulatory Care
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Dermatomyositis - diagnosis - drug therapy
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Administration Schedule
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Immunoglobulin A - metabolism
Immunoglobulins, Intravenous - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Logistic Models
Male
Maximum Tolerated Dose
Multivariate Analysis
Ontario
Probability
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Anecdotal reports have suggested differences in children's tolerance to different intravenous immunoglobulin products; however, there has been little research on this issue. We sought to determine whether different intravenous immunoglobulin products used in the treatment of juvenile dermatomyositis are equally well tolerated by patients and, if not, whether differences in tolerance are linked to immunoglobulin A content.
The intravenous immunoglobulin infusion history (product given and history of adverse events) of patients who were attending the juvenile dermatomyositis clinic at the Hospital for Sick Children from 1986 to 2005 was reviewed. Products with an immunoglobulin A content of >15 microg/mL were classified as "high immunoglobulin A." Data were analyzed by using logistic regression models adjusted for repeated measures.
Thirty-eight patients with juvenile dermatomyositis received 1056 infusions at the Hospital for Sick Children. Adverse events were reported on 92 occasions (9%), affecting 25 patients (66%), a frequency that is higher than that usually reported in adult patients (
PubMed ID
18299304 View in PubMed
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