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Pediatric inferior turbinoplasty with or without adenoidectomy: preliminary report on improvement of quality of life, symptom control, and safety.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126148
Source
J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011 Oct;40(5):420-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Morgan Langille
Hamdy El-Hakim
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, The Stollery Children’s Hospital and University of Alberta Hospital, Edmonton, AB.
Source
J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011 Oct;40(5):420-6
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenoidectomy - methods
Adolescent
Airway Obstruction - surgery
Alberta
Child
Chronic Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Male
Patient Safety
Postoperative Complications - etiology - prevention & control
Quality of Life
Retrospective Studies
Rhinitis - surgery
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - surgery
Treatment Outcome
Turbinates - surgery
Abstract
To determine quality of life (QOL) improvement, symptom control, and safety after inferior turbinoplasty (IT) with or without adenoidectomy (Ad) in children.
Retrospective uncontrolled cohort study.
Tertiary care pediatric hospital.
A prospective database was searched. The database contained information regarding age, gender, other diagnoses, and complications. Inclusion criteria were (1) children who presented with chronic rhinitis (CR) refractory to medical treatment and (2) children who underwent IT with or without Ad.
The Glasgow Children's Benefit Inventory (GCBI) was used to assess QOL improvement. The GCBI calculates a score ranging from -100 (maximum harm) to +100 (maximum benefit), with 0 representing no change after surgery.
Eighty-seven patients were identified. Forty-one were excluded owing to concurrent lingual tonsillectomy or septal or sinus surgery. Forty-six consecutive patients were included. Data were obtained from all 46 patients (100%). The average age was 10 years, with 15 females and 31 males. One complication required admission. The GCBI scores showed that patients derived benefit in all domains (median GCBI 28.1, range -6.3 to 93.8).
Preliminary results indicate that IT with or without Ad is a safe, beneficial procedure for CR in children. The impact of IT on QOL is comparable to that of well-established operations in otolaryngology.
PubMed ID
22420398 View in PubMed
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Bedside emergency department ultrasonography availability and use for blunt abdominal trauma in Canadian pediatric centres.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126169
Source
CJEM. 2012 Jan;14(1):14-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Robin Cardamore
Joe Nemeth
Christine Meyers
Author Affiliation
Emergency Medicine Residency Training Program, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada. robin.cardamore@mail.mcgill.ca
Source
CJEM. 2012 Jan;14(1):14-9
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Injuries - ultrasonography
Canada
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Emergency Service, Hospital - standards - trends
Female
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Male
Needs Assessment
Physician's Practice Patterns
Point-of-Care Systems - standards - trends
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Ultrasonography, Doppler - utilization
Wounds, Nonpenetrating - ultrasonography
Abstract
To quantify the current availability and use of bedside emergency department ultrasonography (EDUS) for blunt trauma at Canadian pediatric centres and to identify any perceived barriers to the use of bedside EDUS in such centres.
An electronic survey was sent to 162 pediatric emergency physicians and 12 site directors from the 12 pediatric emergency departments across Canada.
Ninety-two percent (11 of 12) of centres completed the survey. The individual physician response rate was 65% (106 of 162), with 100% of site directors responding. Ultrasound machines were available in 45% (5 of 11) of centres. Forty-two percent (32 of 77) of emergency physicians working in equipped pediatric centres used bedside EDUS to evaluate blunt abdominal trauma (BAT). In the subgroup of staff who also worked at adults sites, the frequency of ultrasonography use for the evaluation of pediatric BAT was 75%. In the 55% (6 of 11) of centres without ultrasonography, 88% of staff intend to incorporate its use in the future and 81% indicated that they believed the incorporation of ultrasonography would have a positive impact on patient care. The main perceived barriers to the use of ultrasonography in the evaluation of BAT were a lack of training (41%) and a lack of equipment (26%).
Bedside EDUS is currently used in almost half of pediatric trauma centres, a frequency that is significantly lower than adult centres. Physicians in pediatric centres who use ultrasonography report that it has a high utility, and a great majority of physicians at pediatric centres without EDUS plan to incorporate it in the future. The main reported barriers to its use are a lack of training and a lack of equipment availability.
PubMed ID
22417952 View in PubMed
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Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza in Canadian pediatric cancer and hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126178
Source
Influenza Other Respir Viruses. 2012 Nov;6(6):e105-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Dat Tran
Michelle Science
David Dix
Carol Portwine
Shayna Zelcer
Donna L Johnston
Rochelle Yanofsky
Adam Gassas
Marie-Chantal Ethier
Lillian Sung
Author Affiliation
Division of Infectious Diseases, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
Influenza Other Respir Viruses. 2012 Nov;6(6):e105-13
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antiviral Agents - administration & dosage
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Infant
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - drug therapy - epidemiology - pathology - virology
Male
Neoplasms - complications - therapy
Oseltamivir - administration & dosage
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Virus Shedding
Abstract
The impact of pandemic H1N1 influenza (pH1N1) virus in pediatric cancer is uncertain. The objectives of this study were to characterize the clinical course of pH1N1 and identify factors associated with severe outcomes.
We conducted a Canadian multicenter retrospective review of children with cancer and stem cell transplant (SCT) recipients who were diagnosed with laboratory-confirmed pH1N1 infection between May 1, 2009 and January 31, 2010.
We identified 100 (19 in wave 1 and 81 in wave 2) cases of pH1N1 infection. Median age was 8.7 years. 71% had a hematologic malignancy, and 20% received SCT. Median duration of fever and illness was 2 and 12.5 days, respectively. 51 (51.5%) were hospitalized for a median of 5 days, with no deaths and only 1 requiring admission to the intensive care unit. Radiologically confirmed pneumonia was diagnosed in 10 (10%). Interruption of chemotherapy or conditioning occurred in 43 patients. In multivariable analyses, age 5 days) correlated with shortened duration of viral shedding (P=0.041).
pH1N1 infection in pediatric cancer and SCT patients infrequently caused complications but commonly interrupted cancer treatment. Persistent shedding of virus after illness resolution was common. Further research is needed to verify this finding as it could have implications for treatment guidelines and infection control practices.
PubMed ID
22417068 View in PubMed
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Paediatric drug use with focus on off-label prescriptions at Swedish hospitals - a nationwide study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126279
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2012 Jul;101(7):772-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
E. Kimland
P. Nydert
V. Odlind
Y. Böttiger
S. Lindemalm
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. elin.kimland@mpa.se
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2012 Jul;101(7):772-8
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Care Surveys
Hospitals, Pediatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Off-Label Use - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Sweden
Abstract
To perform a nationwide investigation of paediatric drug use at Swedish hospitals, including an analysis of off-label drug use.
All paediatric hospitals in Sweden were invited to register all prescriptions to children, aged between 0 and 18, during two separate 2-day-periods in 2008. Data were reported and analysed with respect to licence status and proportion of and reasons for off-label drug use.
Data on 11,294 prescriptions to 2947 paediatric patients were received. Drugs associated with pain relief, infection, prematurity, nutrition and surgery or anaesthesia were most commonly used. Paracetamol was the most frequently used drug on-label and also among the most commonly used off-label drugs. Nearly half (49%) of all administered prescriptions concerned unlicensed drugs, off-label drugs or extemporaneously prepared drugs. The corresponding rate among neonates was 69%. Lack of paediatric information in the Summary of Product Characteristics was the main reason for off-label classification.
Paediatric off-label drug use is common at Swedish hospitals, and nearly half of all prescriptions were not documented for use in children. The findings emphasize a need for paediatric clinical studies as well as compilation of existing clinical experience and scattered evidence, particularly for drug treatment in infants and neonates.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22404126 View in PubMed
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Assessing the representativeness of Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Programme (CHIRPP) sport and recreational injury data in Calgary, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126720
Source
Int J Inj Contr Saf Promot. 2013;20(1):19-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Jian Kang
Brent Hagel
Carolyn A Emery
Trudi Senger
Willem Meeuwisse
Author Affiliation
University of Calgary Sport Medicine Centre, Roger Jackson Centre for Health and Wellness Research, Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. kang@ucalgary.ca
Source
Int J Inj Contr Saf Promot. 2013;20(1):19-26
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Alberta - epidemiology
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hospital Information Systems - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Pediatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Male
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective of this study was to assess the representativeness of sport and recreational injury data from Canadian Hospital Injury Reporting and Prevention Programme (CHIRPP) in Calgary. Internal representativeness was assessed by comparing CHIRPP and regional health administrative data (ambulatory care classification system-ACCS) at Alberta Children's Hospital (ACH). External representativeness was assessed by comparing CHIRPP with ACCS at all hospitals. Comparisons were performed using descriptive statistics for top injury-producing sports and sports that produced severe injuries. Stratified distributions of injury-producing sports by gender, age group and severity of injury in CHIRPP and ACCS were compared. The proportion of all injuries in Calgary captured by CHIRPP was 64.8% (99%CI: 64.02-65.54%) (16,977/26,206). CHIRPP captured more cases of top injury-producing sports than ACCS at ACH. Rankings of top injury-producing sports in CHIRPP and ACCS at ACH were remarkably consistent (???=?0.92, p?
PubMed ID
22364113 View in PubMed
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Comparison of outcomes in children with hearing aids and cochlear implants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126915
Source
Cochlear Implants Int. 2012 Feb;13(1):5-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Elizabeth M Fitzpatrick
Janet Olds
Isabelle Gaboury
Rosemary McCrae
David Schramm
Andrée Durieux-Smith
Author Affiliation
University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. elizabeth.fitzpatrick@uottawa.ca
Source
Cochlear Implants Int. 2012 Feb;13(1):5-15
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Audiometry - methods
Auditory Threshold
Child
Cochlear Implantation - methods
Cochlear Implants
Cognition - physiology
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hearing Aids - statistics & numerical data
Hearing Loss, Bilateral - diagnosis - therapy
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - diagnosis - therapy
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Male
Ontario
Quality of Life
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Speech Intelligibility
Speech Perception
Speech Production Measurement
Statistics, nonparametric
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to document the performance of a group of children with moderately severe to severe hearing loss who use hearing aids on a range of speech recognition, speech-language, and literacy measures and to compare these results to children with severe to profound hearing loss, who have learned language through cochlear implants.
This study involved 41 children with bilateral sensorineural hearing impairment, aged 6-18 years. Twenty children had moderately severe/severe hearing loss and used hearing aids, and 21 had severe to profound hearing loss and used cochlear implants. Communication and academic skills were assessed using speech recognition tests and standardized measures of speech production, language, phonology, and literacy.
The two groups did not differ in their open-set speech recognition abilities or speech production skills. However, children with hearing aids obtained higher scores than their peers with cochlear implants in the domains of receptive vocabulary, language, phonological memory, and reading comprehension. The findings also indicate that children with moderately severe or severe hearing loss can develop spoken language skills that are within the range expected for normal hearing children.
School-aged children with moderately severe and severe hearing loss performed better in several domains than their peers with profound hearing loss who received cochlear implants between age 2 and 5 years. Further research is required to evaluate the benefits of hearing aids and cochlear implants in children with hearing loss who are diagnosed and receive intervention within the first year of life.
PubMed ID
22340747 View in PubMed
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Treatment of catatonia with electroconvulsive therapy in adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126929
Source
J Child Adolesc Psychopharmacol. 2012 Feb;22(1):96-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012

Central venous catheter database: an important issue in quality assurance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134154
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 2011 May;46(5):942-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Juan Bass
Jacqueline Halton
Youenn Drouet
Andy Ni
Nick Barrowman
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1H 8L1. bass@cheo.on.ca
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 2011 May;46(5):942-5
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Catheter-Related Infections - epidemiology
Catheterization, Central Venous - standards - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Catheters, Indwelling - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Child
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Databases, Factual
Device Removal
Heart Atria
Hospitals, Pediatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Ontario - epidemiology
Parenteral Nutrition, Total - instrumentation - methods - statistics & numerical data
Proportional Hazards Models
Quality Assurance, Health Care - methods
Quebec - epidemiology
Registries
Vena Cava, Superior
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to analyze the factors that affect the longevity of central venous catheters.
Comprehensive clinical data recorded during insertion and removal of totally implantable devices (TID) and tunneled lines (TL) from October 1988 to January 2009 were analyzed. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to identify clinical factors that predict catheter longevity.
Information was available for 1167 central venous catheter insertions in 858 patients, 648 TID and 509 TL. Univariate analysis detected longer device longevity in the following: TID longer than TL (P
PubMed ID
21616257 View in PubMed
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A contemporary evaluation of pulmonary function in children undergoing lung resection in infancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134155
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 2011 May;46(5):829-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Alana Beres
Ann Aspirot
Catherine Paris
Denis Berube
Sarah Bouchard
Jean-Martin Laberge
Larry C Lands
Pramod Puligandla
Author Affiliation
The Montreal Children's Hospital of McGill University Health Centre, Division of Pediatric General Surgery, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, H3H 1P3.
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 2011 May;46(5):829-32
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Follow-Up Studies
Forced expiratory volume
Hospitals, Pediatric - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, University - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Lung - abnormalities - physiopathology - surgery
Muscle strength
Pneumonectomy - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Pulmonary Diffusing Capacity
Quebec - epidemiology
Recovery of Function
Respiratory Muscles - physiology
Surgical Procedures, Elective - statistics & numerical data
Vital Capacity
Abstract
The management of asymptomatic congenital lung lesions is controversial. Some centers recommend resection in infancy, and others prefer observation. Our objective was to evaluate the pulmonary function of children who underwent lung resection at 12 months or younger. We hypothesized that these children would not have a significant reduction in pulmonary function when compared with norms for age.
All patients at 2 tertiary-care children's hospitals who underwent lung resection at 12 months or younger and are currently older than 5 years were identified and prospectively recruited. Pulmonary function testing was standardized in all patients.
Fourteen children were tested prospectively, whereas results were available for another 5 children. Four children were excluded for inability to perform pulmonary function testing (n = 2) or for preexisting pulmonary hypoplasia/syndrome (n = 2). Pulmonary function testing values were considered normal if they were more than 80% of predicted. Forced vital capacity was normal in 14 (93%) of 15 children, and forced expiratory volume in 1 second was normal in 13 (86%) of 15 children. Diffusion capacity and respiratory muscle strength were normal in all children tested.
Most children undergoing lung resection in infancy will have normal pulmonary function tests, supporting our philosophy of early, elective resection of congenital lung lesions.
PubMed ID
21616235 View in PubMed
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810 records – page 1 of 81.