Skip header and navigation

Refine By

260 records – page 1 of 26.

The 10-year COPD Programme in Finland: effects on quality of diagnosis, smoking, prevalence, hospital admissions and mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135938
Source
Prim Care Respir J. 2011 Jun;20(2):178-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Vuokko L Kinnula
Tuula Vasankari
Eva Kontula
Anssi Sovijarvi
Olli Saynajakangas
Anne Pietinalho
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. vuokko.kinnula@helsinki.fi
Source
Prim Care Respir J. 2011 Jun;20(2):178-83
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Diagnostic Techniques, Respiratory System - standards
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospitalization - trends
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Program Evaluation - methods
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Retrospective Studies
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Survival Rate - trends
Young Adult
Abstract
The Finnish National Programme for Chronic Bronchitis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) 1998-2007 was set up to reduce the prevalence of COPD, improve COPD diagnosis and care, reduce the number of moderate to severe cases of the disease, and reduce hospitalisations and treatment costs due to COPD. Over 900 events for 25,000 participating healthcare workers were arranged. The major strengths of this programme included multidisciplinary strategies and web-based guidelines in nearly all primary health care centres around the country.
Data from national registries, epidemiological studies and questionnaires were used to measure whether the goals had been reached.
The prevalence of COPD remained unchanged. Smoking decreased in males from 30% to 26% (p
Notes
Comment In: Prim Care Respir J. 2011 Jun;20(2):109-1021603847
PubMed ID
21431275 View in PubMed
Less detail

30-year nationwide trends in incidence of atrial fibrillation in Denmark and associated 5-year risk of heart failure, stroke, and death.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286741
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2016 Dec 15;225:30-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2016
Author
Morten Schmidt
Sinna Pilgaard Ulrichsen
Lars Pedersen
Hans Erik Bøtker
Jens Cosedis Nielsen
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2016 Dec 15;225:30-36
Date
Dec-15-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Atrial Fibrillation - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Cohort Studies
Death
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Failure - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Hospitalization - trends
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Registries
Risk factors
Stroke - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Time Factors
Abstract
Long-term nationwide trends in atrial fibrillation (AF) incidence and 5-year outcomes are rare.
We conducted a population-based cohort study using the Danish National Patient Registry covering all Danish hospitals. We computed standardized incidence rates during 1983-2012. We used Cox regression to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) of heart failure, stroke, and death within 5years, comparing 5-year calendar periods with the earliest period (1983-1987) as reference.
We identified 312,420 patients with first-time hospital-diagnosed AF. The incidence rate per 100,000person-years increased from 98 in 1983 to 307 in 2012. The mean annual increase during the 30-year study period was 4%, with a 6% increase annually until 2000 and a 1.4% increase annually thereafter. The incidence trends were most pronounced among men and persons above 70years. Among high-risk subgroups, AF incidence was consistently highest in patients with valvular heart disease or heart failure. The rate of heart failure following AF declined by 50% over the entire study period (HR: 0.49, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.48-0.51) and the mortality rate declined by 40% (HR: 0.62, 95% CI: 0.61-0.63). Within the last two decades, the rate for ischemic stroke declined by 20% (HR 0.81, 95% CI: 0.78-0.84), but increased almost as much for haemorrhagic stroke (HR: 1.14, 95% CI: 1.01-1.29).
The long-term risk of heart failure, ischemic stroke, and death following onset of AF has decreased remarkably over the last three decades. Still, the threefold increased incidence of hospital-diagnosed AF during the same period is a major public health concern.
PubMed ID
27705839 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 40 year evolution of the first modern day hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231287
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1989 Feb;34(1):18-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1989
Author
D L Goldman
Author Affiliation
Allan Memorial Institute, Montreal, Quebec.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1989 Feb;34(1):18-9
Date
Feb-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Day Care - organization & administration - trends
Humans
Mental Disorders - therapy
Psychiatric Department, Hospital - trends
Quebec
Therapeutic Community - trends
Abstract
The first modern psychiatric day hospital founded over 40 years ago has gone through a number of re-organizations which reflect utilization patterns representative of day hospitals in general. The author traces chronologically the dynamic movement from self-contained settings emphasizing group integration to expanded structures providing individualized treatment approaches. The day hospital's unique location at the interface of the institution and the community has important implications for today's mental health policy.
PubMed ID
2924242 View in PubMed
Less detail

[About All-Russia Congress "Pediatric Cardiology 2002", Moscow, May 29-31, 2002].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184113
Source
Kardiologiia. 2003;43(3):82-3
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2003

Accidental cold-related injury leading to hospitalization in northern Sweden: an eight-year retrospective analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257987
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2014;22:6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Helge Brändström
Göran Johansson
Gordon G Giesbrecht
Karl-Axel Ängquist
Michael F Haney
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå University, S-901 85 Umeå, Sweden. helge.brandstrom@vll.se.
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2014;22:6
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cold Temperature - adverse effects
Follow-Up Studies
Hospital records
Hospitalization - trends
Humans
Hypothermia - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Incidence
Retrospective Studies
Rewarming - methods
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Cold injuries are rare but important causes of hospitalization. We aimed to identify the magnitude of cold injury hospitalization, and assess causes, associated factors and treatment routines in a subarctic region.
In this retrospective analysis of hospital records from the 4 northernmost counties in Sweden, cases from 2000-2007 were identified from the hospital registry by diagnosis codes for accidental hypothermia, frostbite, and cold-water drowning. Results were analyzed for pre-hospital site events, clinical events in-hospital, and complications observed with mild (temperature 34.9 - 32°C), moderate (31.9 - 28°C) and severe (
Notes
Cites: Resuscitation. 2000 Feb;43(3):22310711494
Cites: Aviat Space Environ Med. 2000 Jul;71(7):733-5210902937
Cites: Wien Klin Wochenschr. 2002 May 15;114(8-9):315-2012212366
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2002 Nov;61(4):352-6212546193
Cites: CMAJ. 2003 Feb 4;168(3):305-1112566336
Cites: High Alt Med Biol. 2003 Spring;4(1):99-10312713717
Cites: Aviat Space Environ Med. 2003 May;74(5):564-7012751587
Cites: Resuscitation. 2003 Dec;59(3):285-9014659598
Cites: Ann Emerg Med. 1987 Sep;16(9):1042-553631669
Cites: Int J Biometeorol. 1991 Mar;34(4):242-62055665
Cites: Emerg Med Clin North Am. 1992 May;10(2):311-271559471
Cites: Plast Reconstr Surg. 1993 Sep;92(4):633-418356126
Cites: Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 1993 Dec;9(4):217-258274830
Cites: J Clin Monit. 1994 Mar;10(2):91-68207458
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1994 Dec 29;331(26):1756-607984198
Cites: BMJ. 1995 Sep 16;311(7007):7257549687
Cites: Eur J Emerg Med. 1995 Mar;2(1):38-469422179
Cites: Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 1997 Oct;13(5):266-729538713
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1998 Jul 13;158(13):1454-609665356
Cites: Resuscitation. 1999 Jul;41(2):105-1110488932
Cites: Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2005 Sep;20(9):862-7116116583
Cites: BMJ. 2006 Mar 25;332(7543):706-916565126
Cites: Surg Clin North Am. 2007 Feb;87(1):247-67, viii17127131
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2009 Oct;35(5):384-9319730758
Cites: Forensic Sci Med Pathol. 2010 Jun;6(2):106-1520151230
Cites: J Surg Educ. 2010 Mar-Apr;67(2):61-520656600
Cites: Resuscitation. 2010 Oct;81(10):1400-3320956045
Cites: Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2011 May;20(5):514-2221308855
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71(0):1-722584518
Cites: Resuscitation. 2012 Sep;83(9):1051-222750023
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2012 Nov 15;367(20):1930-823150960
PubMed ID
24460844 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A comparative description of the formation of population's demand for medical care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182504
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2003 Sep-Oct;(5):35-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
V Ia Gorbunkov
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2003 Sep-Oct;(5):35-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Ambulatory Care - trends - utilization
Health Services - utilization
Health Services Needs and Demand - trends
Hospitalization - trends
Hospitals - utilization
Humans
Middle Aged
Patient satisfaction
Questionnaires
Russia
Abstract
One hundred and twenty seven patients of 24-hour and day-time patient-care facilities (Stavropol Region) were questioned. Problematic situations were denoted in the medical-care system, which are related with a shaping demand for medical care rendered to patients under such service conditions.
PubMed ID
14661416 View in PubMed
Less detail

Active listing and more consultations in primary care are associated with reduced hospitalisation in a Swedish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294536
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2018 02 09; 18(1):101
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-09-2018
Author
Karin Ranstad
Patrik Midlöv
Anders Halling
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Centre for Primary Health Care Research, Clinical Research Centre (CRC), Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Jan Waldenströms gata 35, 205 02, Malmö, Sweden. karin.ranstad@med.lu.se.
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2018 02 09; 18(1):101
Date
02-09-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Databases, Factual
Delivery of Health Care
Female
Hospitalization - trends
Humans
Income
Male
Middle Aged
Primary Health Care
Referral and Consultation - utilization
Social Class
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Healthcare systems are complex networks where relationships affect outcomes. The importance of primary care increases while health care acknowledges multimorbidity, the impact of combinations of different diseases in one person. Active listing and consultations in primary care could be used as proxies of the relationships between patients and primary care. Our objective was to study hospitalisation as an outcome of primary care, exploring the associations with active listing, number of consultations in primary care and two groups of practices, while taking socioeconomic status and morbidity burden into account.
A cross-sectional study using zero-inflated negative binomial regression to estimate odds of any hospital admission and mean number of days hospitalised for the population over 15 years (N =?123,168) in the Swedish county of Blekinge during 2007. Explanatory factors were listed as active or passive in primary care, number of consultations in primary care and primary care practices grouped according to ownership. The models were adjusted for sex, age, disposable income, education level and multimorbidity level.
Mean days hospitalised was 0.94 (95%CI 0.90-0.99) for actively listed and 1.32 (95%CI 1.24-1.40) for passively listed. For patients with 0-1 consultation in primary care mean days hospitalised was 1.21 (95%CI 1.13-1.29) compared to 0.77 (95%CI 0.66-0.87) days for patients with 6-7 consultations. Mean days hospitalised was 1.22 (95%CI 1.16-1.28) for listed in private primary care and 0.98 (95%CI 0.94-1.01) for listed in public primary care, with odds for hospital admission 0.51 (95%CI 0.39-0.63) for public primary care compared to private primary care.
Active listing and more consultations in primary care are both associated with reduced mean days hospitalised, when adjusting for socioeconomic status and multimorbidity level. Different odds of any hospitalisation give a difference in mean days hospitalised associated with type of primary care practice. To promote well performing primary care to maintain good relationships with patients could reduce mean days hospitalised.
Notes
Cites: Eur J Public Health. 2015 Feb;25 Suppl 1:35-43 PMID 25690128
Cites: Health Policy. 2011 Nov;103(1):3-8 PMID 21963153
Cites: PLoS One. 2014 Jul 21;9(7):e102149 PMID 25048354
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2013 Jun 15;13:219 PMID 23768192
Cites: Eur J Public Health. 2013 Jun;23(3):356-60 PMID 22645236
Cites: BMC Fam Pract. 2010 Oct 27;11:81 PMID 20979612
Cites: Lancet. 2012 Jul 7;380(9836):37-43 PMID 22579043
Cites: Ann Fam Med. 2015 Mar;13(2):164-7 PMID 25755038
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2003 Sep;53(494):723-9 PMID 15103882
Cites: Health Serv Res. 2007 Dec;42(6 Pt 1):2233-51; discussion 2294-323 PMID 17995563
Cites: Milbank Q. 2005;83(3):457-502 PMID 16202000
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2005 Oct;55(519):810-1 PMID 16212869
Cites: Health Serv Res. 1991 Apr;26(1):53-74 PMID 1901841
Cites: Health Policy. 2001 Feb;55(2):121-8 PMID 11163651
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2012;12 Suppl 1:S3 PMID 22992346
Cites: Milbank Q. 2001;79(3):387-427, IV PMID 11565162
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2014 Jun;32(2):99-105 PMID 24939741
Cites: BMJ Open. 2017 Jun 9;7(6):e014984 PMID 28601827
Cites: Eur J Public Health. 2004 Sep;14(3):246-51 PMID 15369028
Cites: BMJ. 2002 Jul 20;325(7356):140 PMID 12130611
Cites: Ann Fam Med. 2009 Jul-Aug;7(4):357-63 PMID 19597174
Cites: Health Policy. 2006 Dec;79(2-3):153-64 PMID 16414146
Cites: BMJ. 2001 Oct 6;323(7316):784-7 PMID 11588082
Cites: Health Aff (Millwood). 2013 Apr;32(4):686-94 PMID 23569048
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2008 Aug 20;8:178 PMID 18715502
Cites: BMJ. 2013 Jun 13;346:f3777 PMID 23766466
Cites: Health Syst Transit. 2012;14(5):1-159 PMID 22894859
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2010 Mar 13;10:65 PMID 20226084
Cites: BMJ Open. 2014 May 23;4(5):e004746 PMID 24860000
PubMed ID
29426332 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute care utilization due to hospitalizations for pediatric lower respiratory tract infections in British Columbia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118363
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2012;12:451
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Pablo Santibanez
Katherine Gooch
Pamela Vo
Michelle Lorimer
Yurik Sandino
Author Affiliation
Abbott Laboratories, 200 Abbott Park Road, Abbott Park, IL 60064, USA.
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2012;12:451
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
British Columbia - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Confidence Intervals
Critical Care - utilization
Databases, Factual
Health Care Costs
Hospitalization - trends
Humans
Infant
Length of Stay - trends
Respiratory Tract Infections - classification - epidemiology - therapy
Abstract
Pediatric LRTI hospitalizations are a significant burden on patients, families, and healthcare systems. This study determined the burden of pediatric LRTIs on hospital settings in British Columbia and the benefits of prevention strategies as they relate to healthcare resource demand.
LRTI inpatient episodes for patients
Notes
Cites: Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2006 Sep;25(9):795-80016940836
Cites: Pediatrics. 1998 Sep;102(3 Pt 1):531-79738173
Cites: Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2007 Nov;26(11 Suppl):S41-518090199
Cites: Paediatr Drugs. 2009;11(4):251-719566109
Cites: Curr Med Res Opin. 2009 Nov;25(11):2795-80419788406
Cites: JAMA. 2009 Nov 4;302(17):1872-919822627
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2010 Jun 3;362(22):e6520484390
Cites: Fundam Clin Pharmacol. 2011 Feb;25(1):131-720199586
Cites: Can Respir J. 2011 Mar-Apr;18(2):e10-921499597
Cites: J Med Econ. 2011;14(3):335-4021524154
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2001 Aug;21(2):79-8311457626
Cites: Respir Med. 2002 Apr;96 Suppl B:S1-711996399
Cites: Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2003 Feb;22(2 Suppl):S13-8; discussion S18-2012671448
Cites: Curr Opin Pulm Med. 2003 May;9(3):227-3212682569
Cites: J Pediatr. 2003 Nov;143(5 Suppl):S118-2614615710
Cites: J Pediatr. 2003 Nov;143(5 Suppl):S150-614615714
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2003 Dec 1;188(11):1764-714639549
Cites: Arch Dis Child. 1991 Feb;66(2):227-312001109
Cites: J Pediatr. 1996 Sep;129(3):390-58804328
Cites: J Pediatr. 1997 Jul;131(1 Pt 1):113-79255201
Cites: Home Healthc Nurse. 2007 Jul-Aug;25(7):429-3217667001
PubMed ID
23217103 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age, period and cohort trends in drug abuse hospitalizations within the total Swedish population (1975-2010).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105832
Source
Drug Alcohol Depend. 2014 Jan 1;134:355-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2014
Author
Giuseppe N Giordano
Henrik Ohlsson
Kenneth S Kendler
Marilyn A Winkleby
Kristina Sundquist
Jan Sundquist
Author Affiliation
Center for Primary Health Care Research, Lund University, Jan Waldenströmsgata 35, CRC, building 28, floor 11, entrance 72, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, S-205 02, Sweden. Electronic address: giuseppe_nicola.giordano@med.lu.se.
Source
Drug Alcohol Depend. 2014 Jan 1;134:355-61
Date
Jan-1-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Cohort Studies
Female
Hospitalization - trends
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The societal consequences of drug abuse (DA) are severe and well documented, the World Health Organization recommending tracking of population trends for effective policy responses in treatment of DA and delivery of health care services. However, to correctly identify possible sources of DA change, one must first disentangle three different time-related influences on the need for treatment due to DA: age effects, period effects and cohort effects.
We constructed our main Swedish national DA database (spanning four decades) by linking healthcare data from the Swedish Hospital Discharge Register to individuals, which included hospitalisations in Sweden for 1975-2010. All hospitalized DA cases were identified by ICD codes. Our Swedish national sample consisted of 3078,129 men and 2921,816 women. We employed a cross-classified multilevel logistic regression model to disentangle any net age, period and cohort effects on DA hospitalization rates.
We found distinct net age, period and cohort effects, each influencing the predicted probability of hospitalisation for DA in men and women. Peak age for DA in both sexes was 33-35 years; net period effects showed an increase in hospitalisation for DA from 1996 to 2001; and in birth cohorts 1968-1974, we saw a considerable reduction (around 75%) in predicted probability of hospitalisation for DA.
The use of hospital admissions could be regarded as a proxy of the population's health service use for DA. Our results may thus constitute a basis for effective prevention planning, treatment and other appropriate policy responses.
PubMed ID
24300899 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol consumption in the country and hospitalizations for acute alcohol pancreatitis and liver cirrhosis during a 20-year period.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153152
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2009 May-Jun;44(3):321-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
Juhani Sand
Anu Välikoski
Isto Nordback
Author Affiliation
Department of Gastroenterology and Alimentary Tract Surgery, Division of Surgery, Gastroenterology and Oncology, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland. Juhani.Sand@pshp.fi
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2009 May-Jun;44(3):321-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology - therapy
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospitalization - trends
Humans
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - complications - epidemiology - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Pancreatitis, Alcoholic - complications - epidemiology - therapy
Abstract
Between 1970 and 1989 the incidence of pancreatitis increased in Finland in association with increased alcohol consumption. During the1990s there was a temporary decrease in alcohol consumption. We examined the trends in the amount of alcohol consumed in Finland and the incidence of hospital admissions for acute alcoholic pancreatitis and liver cirrhosis.
The data on hospital admissions and annual alcohol consumption between 1987 and 2007 were obtained from the Finnish National Agency for Welfare and Health.
Alcohol consumption increased from 8.2 litres of ethanol per inhabitant per year in 1987 to 10.5 litres in 2007, but during the economic recession in the country there was a temporary decrease in alcohol consumption between 1992 and 1994, with the lowest consumption of 8.0 litres in 1994. The incidence of hospitalizations for acute alcoholic pancreatitis in the whole population increased significantly during the study period among both men (from 57 to 69/100,000/year) and women (from 7 to 12/100,000/year). However, there was a significant decrease in hospitalizations in 1996 and 1997 correlating with alcohol consumption three years earlier. The incidence of hospitalizations due to liver cirrhosis increased in the age groups over 45 years in both genders throughout the study period. A temporary decrease was observed in 1994, when alcohol consumption was at its lowest. Interestingly, there was a trend from pancreatitis to cirrhosis during the last six years, when the hospitalizations for acute pancreatitis decreased, although the hospitalizations for liver cirrhosis increased following increased alcohol consumption. During the study period the female-to-male ratio for liver cirrhosis was twice as high as for acute alcoholic pancreatitis, but the relative portion of females increased by 50% in both diagnoses.
In contrast to liver cirrhosis, the hospital admissions for which followed the national alcohol consumption, admissions for acute alcoholic pancreatitis ceased to show a connection with the national alcohol consumption during the past several years.
PubMed ID
19144980 View in PubMed
Less detail

260 records – page 1 of 26.