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[Alternative medicine--attitudes and use among physicians, nurses and administrative staff employed in hospitals in northern Norway]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71382
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Mar 6;123(5):604-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-6-2003

Are inpatients' needs better served by hospitalists than by their family doctors?: no.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155704
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2008 Aug;54(8):1101-3, 1105-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Galt Wilson
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Practice, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Galt.Wilson@northernhealth.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2008 Aug;54(8):1101-3, 1105-7
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
British Columbia
Delivery of Health Care - standards - trends
Female
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Hospitalists - standards - trends
Humans
Inpatients - statistics & numerical data
Male
Patient Care - standards - trends
Physician's Practice Patterns - standards - trends
Physicians, Family - standards - trends
Sensitivity and specificity
Notes
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2007 Dec;53(12):213118077751
Comment In: Can Fam Physician. 2008 Nov;54(11):1525-619005116
Comment In: Can Fam Physician. 2008 Sep;54(9):1227, 122918791086
Comment On: Can Fam Physician. 2008 Aug;54(8):1100-1, 1104-618697962
PubMed ID
18697963 View in PubMed
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Are inpatients' needs better served by hospitalists than by their family doctors: yes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155705
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2008 Aug;54(8):1100-1, 1104-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Darryl Samoil
Author Affiliation
Fraser Health Authority Hospitalist Program, Langley Memorial Hospital, Langley, BC, Canada. Darryl.Samoil@fraserhealth.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2008 Aug;54(8):1100-1, 1104-6
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
British Columbia
Delivery of Health Care - standards - trends
Female
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Hospitalists - methods - trends
Humans
Inpatients - statistics & numerical data
Male
Patient Care - methods
Physician's Practice Patterns - standards - trends
Physicians, Family - standards - trends
Sensitivity and specificity
Notes
Cites: JAMA. 2002 Jan 23-30;287(4):487-9411798371
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Cites: Med J Aust. 2003 Jul 7;179(1):6212831392
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2004 Apr;50:664, 667-815116810
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2004 May 6;350(19):1935-615128892
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Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2007 Sep 24;167(17):1869-7417893308
Comment In: Can Fam Physician. 2008 Nov;54(11):1525-619005116
Comment In: Can Fam Physician. 2008 Nov;54(11):152519005117
Comment In: Can Fam Physician. 2008 Sep;54(9):1227, 122918791085
Comment In: Can Fam Physician. 2008 Aug;54(8):1101-3, 1105-718697963
PubMed ID
18697962 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2007 May 17;127(10):1398
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-17-2007
Author
Berg Eli
Kolloen Grethe
Author Affiliation
Senter for helsefremmende arbeid, Akershus universitetssykehus, 1478 Lørenskog. eli.berg@ahus.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2007 May 17;127(10):1398
Date
May-17-2007
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Clinical Competence
Hospitalists
Humans
Norway
Physician Executives
Retirement
Specialties, Medical - manpower
PubMed ID
17520000 View in PubMed
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Autonomy and well-being among Nordic male and female hospital physicians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129202
Source
Work. 2011;40(4):437-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Thamar M Heijstra
Gudbjörg Linda Rafnsdóttir
Lilja Sigrún Jónsdóttir
Author Affiliation
The University of Iceland, Faculty of Social and Human Sciences, Reykjavik, Iceland. thamar@hi.is
Source
Work. 2011;40(4):437-43
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Health status
Hospitalists
Humans
Iceland
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Physicians - psychology
Professional Autonomy
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study is to analyze the level of autonomy of Nordic hospital physicians, to examine whether there is a noticeable gender difference, and to evaluate the relation between autonomy and the well-being of these professionals.
This quantitative study is based on 1697 questionnaires that were filled out by hospital physicians in Sweden, Norway and Iceland.
The quantitative data are analysed statistically. Student's independent sample T-test is used to identify significant gender differences between the means of the variables autonomy and well-being. The Chi-Square test of independence is used to obtain information on the relation between autonomy and the well-being of male and female physicians.
Nordic male physicians enjoy significantly more autonomy than their female colleagues but the average level of autonomy is not very high for either of the genders. Autonomy turns out to have a significant positive effect on the well-being of both male and female hospital physicians, but the effect is stronger among women.
Even though the recent economical crisis makes cutbacks in the health care system necessary, it is important to avoid drastic reorganizations which are aimed at improved efficiency, but threaten the autonomy and well-being of hospital physicians.
PubMed ID
22130061 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
CMAJ. 2002 Nov 26;167(11):1228-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-26-2002
Author
Michael Gordon
Source
CMAJ. 2002 Nov 26;167(11):1228-9
Date
Nov-26-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Emergency Service, Hospital - manpower
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Hospitalists
Humans
Physician Incentive Plans
Physician's Practice Patterns
Physician-Patient Relations
Quebec
Trust
Notes
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2002 Feb 5;136(3):243-611827500
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1999 Nov 18;341(21):1612-610577119
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1995 Mar 1;122(5):377-87847651
Cites: CMAJ. 2002 Sep 17;167(6):617, 61912358184
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1995 Mar 1;122(5):368-747847649
Comment On: CMAJ. 2002 Sep 17;167(6):617, 61912358184
PubMed ID
12451062 View in PubMed
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Source
CMAJ. 2002 Nov 26;167(11):1228
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-26-2002
Author
Mark Roper
Source
CMAJ. 2002 Nov 26;167(11):1228
Date
Nov-26-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Emergency Service, Hospital - manpower
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Hospitalists
Humans
Physician-Patient Relations
Quebec
Safety
Trust
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2002 Sep 17;167(6):617, 61912358184
Comment On: CMAJ. 2002 Sep 17;167(6):617, 61912358184
PubMed ID
12451061 View in PubMed
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Complications of endotracheal intubation in the critically ill.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156315
Source
Intensive Care Med. 2008 Oct;34(10):1835-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Donald E G Griesdale
T Laine Bosma
Tobias Kurth
George Isac
Dean R Chittock
Author Affiliation
Department of Anesthesiology, Pharmacology and Therapeutics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. dgriesdale@post.harvard.edu
Source
Intensive Care Med. 2008 Oct;34(10):1835-42
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Aged
British Columbia - epidemiology
Clinical Competence
Critical Illness
Female
Hospital Mortality
Hospitalists
Humans
Intensive Care Units - statistics & numerical data
Internship and Residency
Intubation, Intratracheal - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Abstract
Assess the risk of complications during endotracheal intubation (ETI) and their association with the skill level of the intubating physician.
Prospective cohort study of 136 patients intubated by the intensive care team during a 5-month period. Standardized data forms were used to collect detailed information on the intubating physicians, supervisors, techniques, medications and complications.
Canadian academic intensive care unit.
All intubations were successful and there were no deaths during intubation. Non-experts were supervised in 92% of procedures. Expert operators were successful within two attempts in 94%, compared to only 82% of non-experts (P = 0.03), with 13.2% of all intubations requiring > or =3 attempts. Furthermore, 10.3% of intubations required 10 or more minutes. Difficult intubation (3 or more attempts by an expert) occurred in 6.6%. Overall risk of complications was 39%, including: severe hypoxemia (19.1%), severe hypotension (9.6%), esophageal intubation (7.4%) and frank aspiration (5.9%). ICU and hospital mortality were 15.4 and 29.4%, respectively. Compared with non-expert intubating physicians, propensity score-adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for expert physicians were 0.92 (95% CI: 0.28, 3.05, P = 0.89) for any complication, 0.45 (95% CI: 0.09, 2.20, P = 0.32) for ICU mortality and 0.47 (95% CI: 0.13, 1.70, P = 0.25) for hospital mortality. Two or more attempts at ETI was independently associated with an increased risk of severe complications (OR 3.31, 95% CI: 1.30, 8.40, P = 0.01).
These prospective data show a high risk of serious complications, and difficult intubations, that are associated with ETI of the critically ill.
Artificial airways and complications.
PubMed ID
18604519 View in PubMed
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[Consultations with specialists in private practice in a Norwegian district]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75983
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Nov 17;125(22):3130-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-17-2005
Author
Lars Erik Kjekshus
Ronny Jørgenvåg
Author Affiliation
Forskningsprogram for ledelse og organisering i helsesektoren (HORN), Institutt for helseledelse og helseøkonomi, Det medisinske fakultet, Universitetet i Oslo, Postboks 1089 Blindern, 0317 Oslo. l.e.kjekshus@medisin.uio.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Nov 17;125(22):3130-2
Date
Nov-17-2005
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Family Practice - statistics & numerical data
Hospitalists
Humans
Norway
Physicians, Family
Private Sector - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Public Sector - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Reimbursement Mechanisms
Specialties, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: After the Norwegian hospital reform of 2002, there has been increased acceptance of private-sector health-care providers. Still, the use of specialist services in private practice is less well documented. This article explores the use of private specialist health care in the south-east of Norway. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The article is based on several sources of data, including data from the Norwegian Patient Register and from the National Insurance Administration on reimbursements. Also a survey was sent out to a sample of general practitioner; in-depth interviews were carried out with a sample of hospital physicians and private specialists. RESULTS: The article shows that private specialists with contract with Helse Øst provided 151 consultations per 1000 inhabitants over the period September to November 2003, while the public outpatient clinics provided 186 consultations. The service provision varies geographically and between specialties. In one county the use of private specialists is 174 consultations per 1000 inhabitants; in another it is 80 per 1000 inhabitants. Private-sector specialists within the fields of eye, ear-nose-throat and skin provided two thirds of all outpatient services in their respective fields. INTERPRETATION: The results indicate that the services of specialists in private practice should be more focused on and discussed in relation to integrated healthcare and the relationship between specialised hospital services and primary healthcare.
PubMed ID
16299572 View in PubMed
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Continuity of care and patient outcomes after hospital discharge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179543
Source
J Gen Intern Med. 2004 Jun;19(6):624-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Carl van Walraven
Muhammad Mamdani
Jiming Fang
Peter C Austin
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. carlv@ohri.ca
Source
J Gen Intern Med. 2004 Jun;19(6):624-31
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Continuity of Patient Care - standards
Female
Hospitalists
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Medical Records - standards
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Ontario
Patient Discharge
Patient Readmission
Physicians, Family
Risk factors
Abstract
Patients are often treated in hospital by physicians other than their regular community doctor. After they are discharged, their care is often returned to their regular community doctor and patients may not see the hospital physician. Transfer of information between physicians can be poor. We determined whether early postdischarge outcomes changed when patients were seen after discharge by physicians who treated them in the hospital.
This cohort study used population-based administrative databases to follow 938833 adults from Ontario, Canada, after they were discharged alive from a nonelective medical or surgical hospitalization between April 1, 1995, and March 1, 2000. We determined when patients were seen after discharge by physicians who treated them in the hospital, physicians who treated them 3 months prior to admission (community physicians), and specialists. The outcome of interest was 30-day death or nonelective readmission to hospital.
Of patients studied, 7.7% died or were readmitted. The adjusted relative risk of death or readmission decreased by 5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4% to 5%) and 3% (95% CI, 2% to 3%) with each additional visit to a hospital physician rather than a community physician or specialist, respectively. The effect of hospital physician visits was cumulative, with the adjusted risk of 30-day death or nonelective readmission reduced to 7.3%, 7.0%, and 6.7% if patients had 1, 2, or 3 visits, respectively, with a hospital rather than a community physician. The effect was consistent across important subgroups.
Patient outcomes could be improved if their early postdischarge visits were with physicians who treated them in hospital rather than with other physicians. Follow-up visits with a hospital physician, rather than another physician, could be a modifiable factor to improve patient outcomes following discharge from hospital.
Notes
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PubMed ID
15209600 View in PubMed
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56 records – page 1 of 6.