Skip header and navigation

Refine By

   MORE

14 records – page 1 of 2.

[A cerebrovascular unit. Experiences after 8-years of activity].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223602
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1992 Jun 10;112(15):1974-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-10-1992
Author
T. Dahl
P M Sandset
U. Abildgaard
Author Affiliation
Medisinsk avdeling, Aker sykehus, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1992 Jun 10;112(15):1974-6
Date
Jun-10-1992
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cerebral Hemorrhage - diagnosis - mortality - rehabilitation
Cerebral Infarction - diagnosis - mortality - rehabilitation
Cerebrovascular Disorders - diagnosis - mortality - rehabilitation
Hospital Units - manpower - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Ischemic Attack, Transient - diagnosis - mortality - rehabilitation
Norway - epidemiology
Prognosis
Abstract
The authors review experience gained from developing and running a non-intensive stroke unit during the years 1983-91. The number of patients treated per year has increased from 65 to 149. The average length of stay in hospital has dropped from 21 to 15 days. About 87% of the patients had verified stroke, 7% had transient ischemic attacks (TIAs). Other intracranial diseases were found in 3.3%. The mortality rate was low (5%) 48% of the patients were transferred to a rehabilitation centre, 37% were discharged to their homes, with or without out-patient care, and 10% were discharged to nursing homes. Early and systematic investigations and multi-disciplinary rehabilitation in a specialized stroke unit increases the quality of care for patients suffering from stroke. A shorter stay in hospital gives a bonus in the form of reduced health expenditures.
PubMed ID
1509463 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Can admission of acutely ill internal medicine patients to an intermediate care unit replace hospital admission?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182364
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2003 Nov 24;165(48):4640-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-24-2003

[Current medicine requires cooperation--not omnipotence].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198301
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Apr 26;97(17):2110-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-26-2000

[Geriatric psychiatry--a specialty gaining recognition]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46375
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Oct 20;117(25):3681-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-20-1997
Author
K. Engedal
E. Nordberg
K M Moksnes
H K Henriksen
A L Bergem
Author Affiliation
Psykogeriatrisk seksjon, Ullevål sykehus, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Oct 20;117(25):3681-3
Date
Oct-20-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
English Abstract
Geriatric Psychiatry - manpower - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Health Services for the Aged - manpower - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Hospital Units - manpower - organization & administration
Humans
Norway
Questionnaires
Abstract
Services for elderly, mentally ill people have developed in response to changing needs in society. In 1990 most of the 650 beds allocated to elderly patients in psychiatric hospitals were occupied by long-term care patients. Outpatient programmes hardly existed. In 1995 about 400 beds were allocated to geriatric psychiatry. They were served by 40 physicians and 20 psychologists. Out-patients' clinics were established. Most of the in-patients were short-term admissions. Nowadays, departments of geriatric psychiatry define themselves as diagnostic and short-term units. About a third of the in-patients suffer from dementia, a third from depression, and a third from various other psychiatric disorders. The authors recommend that a special unit for geriatric psychiatry should be established in every county in Norway. Funds should be allocated for professorships at all universities.
PubMed ID
9417665 View in PubMed
Less detail

[How can sufficient information be ensured in clinical trials at an oncology department?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25077
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 Nov 26;152(48):3594-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-26-1990
Author
A B Jensen
Author Affiliation
Onkologisk afdeling R., Odense Sygehus.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 Nov 26;152(48):3594-6
Date
Nov-26-1990
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Trials
Denmark
English Abstract
Hospital Units - manpower - organization & administration
Humans
Informed consent
Neoplasms - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Patient Participation
Professional-Patient Relations
Abstract
It is difficult to comply with the intention that the patient gives consent to participation in a clinical trial on the basis of complete information. Reasons for this are the doctor's defective knowledge about processes of communication and his desire to protect the patient, and sometimes also himself, from disagreeable information. Solution of these problems requires more knowledge about theories of communication and crises and improved planning in how to provide this information. The patient's possibility of understanding the information on which he can base an independent decision may be improved by offering several conversations, improved presentation of the written information, the presence of a relative at the informative conversation and supplying the patient with a contact person from the staff for further information. It is concluded that more structured informative procedures are necessary in the individual departments in order to ensure that the patient receives sufficient information before giving qualified consent.
PubMed ID
2256218 View in PubMed
Less detail

Nurses' use of time in a medical-surgical ward with all-RN staffing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191162
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2001 Jan;9(1):13-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2001
Author
S. Lundgren
K. Segesten
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing and Institute of Health Care Pedagogics, Göteborg University, Billerudsgatan 1, 416 75 Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2001 Jan;9(1):13-20
Date
Jan-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
General Surgery - organization & administration
Health Services Research
Hospital Units - manpower - organization & administration
Hospitals, University
Humans
Internal Medicine - organization & administration
Nursing Administration Research
Nursing Process
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration - supply & distribution
Patient-Centered Care
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling
Sweden
Time and Motion Studies
Abstract
To investigate allocation of nursing time, organisation of nursing activities and whether or not allocation and organisation have changed over time.
In a ward that changed to all-RN staffing, the nurses were encouraged to implement a patient-focused philosophy. The nurses perceived that they had difficulty in using the time available efficiently.
Non-participant observations were conducted with 2-year intervals. Ten consecutive weekdays were covered on two occasions. The study was carried out at a university hospital in Sweden.
Between observations, a significant change in the organization of the direct care had occurred, and the same tendency was found in patient administration and general management. The organization of work changed from a partly fragmented to a more coherent one. The time used for direct care and administrative activities increased between the two observations, while indirect care, personal and service activities decreased.
It can be suggested that the nurses used their time efficiently and, over time, they developed a more coherent way of organizing nursing activities.
PubMed ID
11879440 View in PubMed
Less detail

Personal decontamination after exposure to stimulated liquid phase contaminants: functional assessment of a new unit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204268
Source
J Toxicol Clin Toxicol. 1998;36(6):567-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
S. Törngren
S A Persson
A. Ljungquist
T. Berglund
M. Nordstrand
L. Hägglund
L. Rittfeldt
K. Sandgren
E. Söderman
Author Affiliation
Disaster and Emergency Medical Center, Stockholm Söder Hospital, Sweden. staffan.torngren@demc.sos.sll.se
Source
J Toxicol Clin Toxicol. 1998;36(6):567-73
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational
Adolescent
Adult
Chemical Warfare Agents
Decontamination - methods
Female
Hospital Units - manpower - organization & administration
Hospitals, Urban
Humans
Lactates - analysis
Male
Management Audit
Middle Aged
Mustard Gas
Salicylates - analysis
Sarin
Sulfur Hexafluoride - analysis
Sweden
Ventilation - methods
Abstract
To evaluate the efficacy of a decontamination station following exposure of volunteers to liquids with physical characteristics comparable to sarin and mustard gas.
Twenty-four volunteers participated in the experiment which was performed with all staff wearing personal protective equipment including respiratory protection. The clothes, skin, and hair of the volunteers were contaminated with the simulated liquid phase contaminants, ethyl lactate and methyl salicylate. Sulphur hexafluoride gas was used to confirm the ventilation efficacy. Decontamination followed guidelines using a two-stage procedure. In the first chamber, all volunteers received a 3-minute shower with water at 30 degrees C, and their clothes but not their respiratory masks were removed. In the second, they were twice washed thoroughly with soap and water. After decontamination, the volunteers entered a third chamber for first aid measures.
The air concentration of sulphur hexafluoride was reduced by 1:10,000 between the first and the third chambers. Ethyl lactate and methyl salicylate were measured in low concentrations in the third chamber. The capacity was 16 volunteers per hour with two-thirds on stretchers. After self-decontamination of the staff, the concentration of ethyl lactate increased significantly in the third chamber, consistent with residual ethyl lactate adsorbed by their underwear. This observation revealed a deficiency in the guidelines for self-decontamination.
The capacity of the decontamination unit was found to be 16 volunteers per hour. The ventilation system and guidelines of the decontamination unit were demonstrated to be effective under the conditions examined. The self-decontamination of the staff was not optimal.
PubMed ID
9776959 View in PubMed
Less detail

Recruitment & retention. A successful model in forensic psychiatric nursing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193193
Source
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 2001 Sep;39(9):18-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
S E Pullan
K A Lorbergs
Author Affiliation
Law and Mental Health Program, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, 1001 Queen Street West, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M6J 1H4. Shirley_Pullan@CAMH.net
Source
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 2001 Sep;39(9):18-25
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Forensic Psychiatry - manpower
Hospital Units - manpower - organization & administration
Hospitals, Psychiatric - manpower
Humans
Inservice training
Job Description
Models, organizational
Nursing Staff - supply & distribution
Ontario
Organizational Objectives
Personnel Loyalty
Personnel Selection - organization & administration
Psychiatric Nursing - manpower
Security Measures
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers - manpower
Abstract
1. The recruitment and retention of forensic psychiatric nurses in this highly competitive environment has been identified as a critical issue. 2. In response to the need to expand services, the development, implementation, and evaluation of an innovative model that has demonstrated success in the recruitment and retention of nurses for this highly specialized area of practice are described. 3. The successful recruitment and retention of forensic psychiatric nurses may be facilitated by developing and implementing strategies that integrate the goals and objectives of the organization with the needs of individual nurses.
PubMed ID
11565230 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Stroke unit care saves lives. The Swedish national quality assessment registry of stroke care is the first of its kind in the world]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72353
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Jun 2;96(22):2719-24, 2726
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2-1999
Author
B. Stegmayr
K. Asplund
B P Danielsson
K. Hulter-Asberg
B. Norrving
M. Peltonen
A. Terént
M. Thorngren
P O Wester
Author Affiliation
Medicinska institutionen, Norrlands Universitetssjukhus, Umeå. birgitta.stegmayr@medicin.umu.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Jun 2;96(22):2719-24, 2726
Date
Jun-2-1999
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cerebrovascular Disorders - mortality - rehabilitation - therapy
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Female
Hospital Mortality
Hospital Units - manpower - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Registries - standards
Sweden
Abstract
Meta-analyses of randomised trials of acute stroke treated in specialised stroke units have yielded convincing evidence of benefits in terms of reduced mortality rates, as compared with treatment in a general ward. However, no studies had been performed to ascertain whether the promising results could be reproduced in routine clinical practice. Accordingly, a comparison of routine care of acute stroke patients in stroke units (SUs) with that in general wards (GWs) was made on the basis of data for the 14,300 cases of acute stroke from 87 units in 80 Swedish hospitals registered in 1996 at the Swedish national stroke registry, the first of its kind in the world. Among patients capable of independent daily life and fully conscious at admission, the mortality rate was lower in the SU than in the GW subgroup, both at discharge from hospital and three months after the stroke event; and three months after stroke, a greater proportion of SU patients had been discharged to their homes, and a smaller proportion were in long-term care. However, no such subgroup differences were found among patients with impaired consciousness at admission. Thus, the promising results of the randomised trials of SU treatment would appear to be reproducible in routine clinical practice, though the beneficial effect is smaller in magnitude.
PubMed ID
10388298 View in PubMed
Less detail

14 records – page 1 of 2.