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136 records – page 1 of 14.

The 1996 Helene Hudson Memorial Lecture. Work redesign and re-engineering: a challenge for professional nursing practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206735
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 1997 Nov;7(4):198-201, 204-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1997
Author
L. Vincent
Author Affiliation
Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Can Oncol Nurs J. 1997 Nov;7(4):198-201, 204-8
Date
Nov-1997
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Competence
Hospital Restructuring - organization & administration
Humans
Oncology Nursing - education - organization & administration
Organizational Innovation
Abstract
Work redesign and re-engineering have become the buzzwords of the 1990s as all sectors of the health care arena struggle to meet the demands of patient care while coping with increasing fiscal constraint. Redesign and re-engineering are terms that describe a wide range of strategies in health care and radically different models of care delivery. These new approaches to care are shifting the way we view care delivery and how it is structured. This paper describes the principles of redesign and re-engineering, common applications in health care organizations, outcomes and evaluation. Multiskilling and use of genetic health care workers are addressed. The potential impact on the practice of oncology nurses is explored as well as strategies to meet the challenges of today's health care environment.
PubMed ID
9450417 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute care has an innovative approach to the bed crisis!

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199854
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 1999;12(3):54-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
D. Goulard
C. Simpson
Author Affiliation
Patient Transition Services, Peter Lougheed Centre, Calgary, Alberta.
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 1999;12(3):54-6
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Alberta
Bed Occupancy
Health Facility Closure
Hospital Restructuring
Humans
National Health Programs
Organizational Innovation
Patient Discharge
Regional Health Planning - organization & administration
Abstract
The regionalization of healthcare in Alberta has been instrumental in changing the way we deliver healthcare to the population. In Calgary, the restructuring involved the closing of three acute care hospitals and a significant reduction in beds per capita. This reduction in inpatient beds behooved Senior Management in acute care to be innovative and responsive to the utilization of existing resources. The Department of Patient Transition Services was conceived with a mandate to provide assistance and support in utilization management and discharge planning, administrative coordination, system support and integration support. The evolution of this unique department is described.
PubMed ID
10623171 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute day hospitalization as an alternative to inpatient treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210487
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1996 Dec;41(10):629-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
V. Russell
F. Mai
K. Busby
D. Attwood
M. Davis
M. Brown
Author Affiliation
Cavan General Hospital, Republic of Ireland.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1996 Dec;41(10):629-37
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Day Care - utilization
Female
Hospital Bed Capacity - statistics & numerical data
Hospital Restructuring
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Middle Aged
Ontario
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Patient satisfaction
Referral and Consultation - utilization
Treatment Outcome
Utilization Review
Abstract
This paper describes the administrative process by which the Ottawa General Hospital (OGH) closed 6 beds and used the staff and space resources thus released to set up an acute day hospital (ADH) for the treatment of 8 acutely ill psychiatric patients. Outcome data are presented on the first 160 patients admitted to the ADH.
Demographic and clinical information including diagnostic (DSM-III-R; Global Assessment of Functioning [GAF]) and questionnaire data (Symptom Checklist-90 Revised [SCL-90R]; Beck Depression Inventory [BDI]; State-Trait Anxiety Inventory [STAI]; patient satisfaction) were obtained from 160 ADH patients at admission and discharge. Forty-two of these patients provided follow-up data 3 to 6 months postdischarge. The outcome of ADH patients was compared with that of a retrospectively obtained random sample (n = 100) of inpatients on selected diagnostic and demographic variables.
On clinician-rated and self-report clinical scales, ADH patients showed significant clinical improvement reflected in higher GAF scores and less psychological distress, depression, and anxiety at discharge relative to admission. There were no significant group differences in outcome indices except for shorter length of stay in the ADH group compared with inpatients. The ADH group rated the program highly in help received and quality of service. Short-term follow-up showed that gains made during treatment were maintained 3 to 6 months later.
These results show that a time-limited day hospital program is clinically effective for acutely ill psychiatric patients and leads to a more efficient use of inpatient resources. We believe that partial hospitalization for the treatment of acute psychiatric disorders may have wide application in psychiatric hospital practice.
PubMed ID
8978941 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analysis of prehospital transport of head-injured patients after consolidation of neurosurgery resources.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189076
Source
J Trauma. 2002 Aug;53(2):345-50; discussion 350
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
Carol D Holmen
Terry Sosnowski
Karen L Latoszek
Darryl Dow
Brian H Rowe
Author Affiliation
Division of Emergency Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. cholmen@ualberta.ca
Source
J Trauma. 2002 Aug;53(2):345-50; discussion 350
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alberta - epidemiology
Brain Injuries - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Emergency Medical Services - organization & administration
Female
Hospital Restructuring
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Transfer - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Triage - methods
Abstract
Consolidation of neurosurgical (NS) services resulted in emergency medical services guidelines mandating transport of head-injured patients to the NS center if the Glasgow Coma Scale score is 3. This study determined what paramedic, system, or patient factors were associated with secondary head-injury transfer.
This study was a retrospective chart review from January 1996 to November 1998.
Ninety-one patient charts were reviewed. The median transport delay to the NS site was 4 hours 22 minutes. After transfer, 79 (96%) patients were admitted, 25 (30%) underwent craniotomy, and 18 (22%) died. The final diagnosis in 35 (43%) cases was subdural hematoma. Triage guidelines were violated in five patients (6%) and the NS center was on diversion in three (4%) cases. Most delays were related to patient presentations; 17 (21%) patients had no history of head trauma.
Unpredictable patient factors were the most frequent reasons patients required secondary transfer; few protocol violations or system factors were identified. No modifications to the current NS triage criteria are recommended.
PubMed ID
12169945 View in PubMed
Less detail

An assessment of the introduction of a multi-skilled worker into an acute care setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209055
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 1996;9(3):43-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
B. Trerise
L. Lemieux-Charles
Author Affiliation
St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia.
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 1996;9(3):43-8
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decision Making, Organizational
Food Service, Hospital
Hospital Restructuring - manpower
Housekeeping, Hospital
Humans
Job Description
Ontario
Organizational Culture
Organizational Objectives
Patient-Centered Care - organization & administration
Personnel, Hospital - classification - standards
Psychology, Industrial
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Abstract
The first reengineering project undertaken by the Sunnybrook Health Science Centre after adopting a philosophy of patient-focused care was the introduction of a new category of worker: the multi-skilled service assistant. This article describes the experiences of the first two cohorts of service assistants and assesses the changes made to the work itself and the integration of the new workers into the work environment. It concludes by sharing recommendations for introducing a new work role.
PubMed ID
10162424 View in PubMed
Less detail

[An intensive therapeutic effort in spite of reduced economic resources. Background, course and consequences of a structural reorganization at a large regional diabetic clinic]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48705
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 Aug 20;152(34):2442-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-20-1990

136 records – page 1 of 14.