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110 records – page 1 of 11.

Acoustics and psychosocial environment in intensive coronary care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70774
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2005 Mar;62(3):e1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
V. Blomkvist
C A Eriksen
T. Theorell
R. Ulrich
G. Rasmanis
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Psychosocial Factors and Health, Stockholm, Sweden. vanja.blomkvist@pubcare.uu.se
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2005 Mar;62(3):e1
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acoustics
Adult
Aged
Coronary Care Units
Female
Health Services Research
Hospital Design and Construction
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Noise, Occupational - adverse effects
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Occupational Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Occupational Health
Principal Component Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Speech Intelligibility
Stress, Psychological - etiology - prevention & control
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Stress, strain, and fatigue at the workplace have previously not been studied in relation to acoustic conditions. AIMS: To examine the influence of different acoustic conditions on the work environment and the staff in a coronary critical care unit (CCU). METHOD: Psychosocial work environment data from start and end of each individual shift were obtained from three shifts (morning, afternoon, and night) for a one-week baseline period and for two four-week periods during which either sound reflecting or sound absorbing tiles were installed. RESULTS: Reverberation times and speech intelligibility improved during the study period when the ceiling tiles were changed from sound reflecting tiles to sound absorbing ones of identical appearance. Improved acoustics positively affected the work environment; the afternoon shift staff experienced significantly lower work demands and reported less pressure and strain. CONCLUSIONS: Important gains in the psychosocial work environment of healthcare can be achieved by improving room acoustics. The study points to the importance of further research on possible effects of acoustics in healthcare on staff turnover, quality of patient care, and medical errors.
PubMed ID
15723873 View in PubMed
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The aesthetic dimension in hospitals--an investigation into strategic plans.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81540
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2006 Sep;43(7):851-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Caspari Synnøve
Eriksson Katie
Nåden Dagfinn
Author Affiliation
Oslo University College, Faculty of Nursing, Oslo, Norway. Synnove.Caspari@su.hio.no
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2006 Sep;43(7):851-9
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Art
Environment Design - standards
Esthetics
Food Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Guidelines
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research
Hospital Design and Construction - standards
Hospitals, General - organization & administration
Humans
Interior Design and Furnishings - standards
Noise - prevention & control
Norway
Patient-Centered Care - organization & administration
Patients' Rooms - organization & administration
Philosophy, Medical
Plants
Questionnaires
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND RATIONALE: The underlying assumption was that the aesthetics of the hospital surroundings are often neglected. AIMS: This article is the first part of a larger study into the aesthetics of general hospitals. The aim of the study is to throw light on the influence of aesthetics on the health and well-being of patients and the professional personnel, and to examine how aesthetic considerations are dealt with. We present a survey of how the aesthetic dimension is planned and it is considered important in the strategic plans of Norwegian general hospitals. METHODS: Data were sampled by analyzing the strategic plans of somatic hospitals. Sixty-four of 86 hospitals responded (74%). Concepts were categorized in a matrix of 11 main categories, each with subcategories. The method was quantitative, in that the analyzed material was amenable to counting. RESULTS: Very few concrete guidelines or directions for the aesthetic dimension have been included in written documents. This indicates that the aesthetic area is a neglected field in the directions for the daily management of hospitals. CONCLUSIONS: The research available today on the contribution of environmental aesthetics to health, rehabilitation, and well-being suggests that it is important to have concrete guidelines recorded in strategic plans. This field concerns the maintenance of high quality in the caring professions.
PubMed ID
16824528 View in PubMed
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Source
Mental Hospitals. 1959 Sep;10:39-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1959
Author
Smith, JBK
Author Affiliation
Alaska Department of Mental Health, Juneau, Alaska
Source
Mental Hospitals. 1959 Sep;10:39-41
Date
Sep-1959
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Anchorage
Mental health act
Mental health facilities
Mental health program
Public Law 830
State mental hospital
Hospital Design and Construction
Abstract
The new state of Alaska hopes to announce the completion of its first state mental hospital sometime in 1960. The six-and-a-half-million-dollar structure, to be built in two stages, will be located four miles from the center of the city of Anchorage. Its function will be to serve as an integral part of the total mental health program in which the social forces in the community will be utilized to the maximum by means of mental health clinics where early treatment will be instituted and hospitalization prevented.
PubMed ID
13832003 View in PubMed
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Alaska Psychiatric Institute. 2. Architectural solutions to geographic and medical problems

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99620
Source
Mental Hospitals. 1964 May;15:246-248
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1964
Author
Agron, G
Source
Mental Hospitals. 1964 May;15:246-248
Date
May-1964
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Alaska
Academies and Institutes
Hospital Design and Construction
PubMed ID
14146073 View in PubMed
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Are human beings supposed to work in Norwegian hospitals?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280650
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2016 Jun;136(11):984
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
Hans Erik Heier
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2016 Jun;136(11):984
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health Facility Environment
Hospital Design and Construction
Hospitals
Humans
Norway
Workplace
PubMed ID
27325029 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2004 Dec 13;166(51):4698-701
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-13-2004
Author
Ib Hessov
Author Affiliation
ib.hessov@privat.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2004 Dec 13;166(51):4698-701
Date
Dec-13-2004
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Environment Design - trends
Health Facility Environment - trends
Hospital Design and Construction - trends
Humans
Interior Design and Furnishings
Paintings
Sculpture
PubMed ID
15669525 View in PubMed
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Asthma symptoms in relation to measured building dampness in upper concrete floor construction, and 2-ethyl-1-hexanol in indoor air.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10335
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2000 Nov;4(11):1016-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2000
Author
D. Norbäck
G. Wieslander
K. Nordström
R. Wålinder
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences/Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital, Uppsala University, Sweden. dan.norback@medsci.uu.se
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2000 Nov;4(11):1016-25
Date
Nov-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects
Allergens
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Construction Materials
Diethylhexyl Phthalate - adverse effects
Female
Hexanols - adverse effects
Hospital Design and Construction
Hospitals
Humans
Humidity - adverse effects
Logistic Models
Male
Personnel, Hospital
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
SETTING: Asthma symptoms in adults in relation to the indoor environment. OBJECTIVES: To study the relationships between current asthma symptoms (wheeze or attacks of breathlessness) and the indoor environment and dampness in hospitals. DESIGN: A study among personnel (n = 87) in four geriatric hospitals in winter. Indoor air pollutants, dampness in the concrete floor, and allergens in settled dust were measured. Multiple logistic regression analysis was applied, adjusting for age, sex, atopy, and dampness in the participants' own dwellings. RESULTS: Current asthma symptoms were reported by 17%, and 8% had doctor's diagnosed asthma. Asthma symptoms were more common (adjusted odds ratio = 8.6; 95% confidence interval 1.3-56.7) in two buildings with signs of dampness-related degradation of di(ethylhexyl)-phthalate (DEHP) in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) floor material, detected as presence of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol (2-32 microg/m3) in indoor air (CAS nr 104-76-7). Asthma symptoms were related to higher relative humidity in the upper concrete floor construction, and ammonia in the floor. The newest hospital, built by an anthroposophic society, had low levels of dampness and few asthma symptoms (4%). Cat (Fel d1) and dog allergens (Can f1) were found in dust from all buildings (geometric mean 340 ng/g and 2490 ng/g, respectively). House dust mite allergens (Derp1, Derf1, or Derm1) were found in 75% of all samples (geometric mean 130 ng/g). There was no relationship between allergen levels and asthma symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Asthma symptoms may be related to increased humidity in concrete floor constructions and emission of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, an indicator of dampness-related alkaline degradation of plasticiser DEHP. Moreover, geriatric hospitals can be contaminated by significant amounts of cat, dog and mite allergens.
PubMed ID
11092713 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Lakartidningen. 2008 Feb 6-12;105(6):383
Publication Type
Article

110 records – page 1 of 11.