Skip header and navigation

Refine By

   MORE

11 records – page 1 of 2.

[Eating disorders--how is treatment organized?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203108
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Jan 10;119(1):21-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-10-1999
Author
J H Rosenvinge
J S Borgen
Author Affiliation
Institutt for psykologi Universitetet i Tromsø.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Jan 10;119(1):21-3
Date
Jan-10-1999
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anorexia Nervosa - therapy
Bulimia - therapy
Clinical Competence
Eating Disorders - therapy
Education, Medical, Continuing
Hospital Departments - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Norway
Patient Care Planning - organization & administration - standards
Psychiatric Department, Hospital - organization & administration - standards
Questionnaires
Abstract
A nation-wide survey of the organisation and efficiency of public health care services for Norwegian patients with eating disorders was conducted among the heads of medical and psychiatric units (N = 261). Only the number of patients treated predicted special clinical routines or measures to increase the clinical competence, and not geographical location of institutions or the national health authorities' distribution of treatment recommendations. To improve the quality of the health care services, the informants stressed the importance of increased clinical competence, more resources enabling more patients to be treated, as well as improved cooperation between the medical and psychiatric treatment units.
PubMed ID
10025199 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Is quality assurance only an empty phrase?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196390
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Oct 20;120(25):3010-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-20-2000
Author
J. Haffner
F A Mürer
O G Aasland
Author Affiliation
Kirurgisk avdeling, Buskerud sentralsykehus, Drammen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Oct 20;120(25):3010-2
Date
Oct-20-2000
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Follow-Up Studies
Hospital Departments - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Leadership
Medical Errors
Norway
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Questionnaires
Abstract
Norwegian hospitals and their leaders are required by law to engage in quality assurance. We wanted to study to what extent the heads of hospital departments were actually engaged in such activities.
Data were collected by questionnaires sent to heads of hospital departments in Norway (n = 657), of whom 567 (86%) responded.
Only 23% of those interviewed prior to their appointment had been asked about experience in quality assurance, less than 30% had written instructions for their work, and only about 40% received regular follow-up from the hospital administration. The majority registered complaints and mistakes, and was engaged in teaching quality assurance. 58% of the heads of small departments and 73% of those of large departments reported that quality in general suffered because of the demands for higher clinical productivity.
Most heads of hospital departments in Norway are engaged in quality assurance work, but the study indicates that hospital administration attaches little importance to this type of work.
PubMed ID
11109387 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Modern health care requires well-functioning infection clinics. It must be possible to isolate infected patients and to maintain basic hygiene routines].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177864
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Sep 23;101(39):2980-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-23-2004

[More demands on internal medicine from patients with multiple diseases. The specialties of internal medicine should have an overall leadership].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199053
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Feb 16;97(7):713-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-16-2000

[New routines in orthopedics department yielded more efficient care and more satisfied patients. Physiotherapist and team make the first assessment in new visits to the spine surgeon].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271287
Source
Lakartidningen. 2015;112
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Björn Knutsson
Thomas Torstensson
Source
Lakartidningen. 2015;112
Date
2015
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Hospital Departments - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Orthopedics - organization & administration - standards
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Patient care team
Patient satisfaction
Physical Examination
Physical Therapy Modalities
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Spine - surgery
Surgeons - supply & distribution
Surgical Procedures, Operative
Sweden
Waiting Lists
Abstract
There is a shortage of spine surgeons in Sweden. To guarantee the legal right to healthcare, many counties must hire doctors, with increasing costs. In our new out-patient department routine, the majority of the patients are examined by a physiotherapist at their first visit. History taking and clinical and radiographic examinations are discussed in a team conference, and possible candidates for spine surgery are selected for an appointment with a spine surgeon. Furthermore, the patients were more satisfied with the new routine and management plan.
PubMed ID
26371481 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Patient based care registries as a tool to follow up services].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195688
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Jan 10;98(1-2):25-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-10-2001
Author
M H Arnlind
K G Brege
A. Aberg-Wistedt
L. Bejhed
S. Gårdmark
B. Kron
M. Lindberg
H. Rydhström
B. Rynnel-Dagöö
B. Stymne
W. Thorburn
Author Affiliation
Ogonkliniken, Mälarsjukhuset, Eskilstuna. marianne.heibert-arnlind@lf.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Jan 10;98(1-2):25-9
Date
Jan-10-2001
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Databases, Factual
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Follow-Up Studies
Hospital Communication Systems
Hospital Departments - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Medical Record Linkage
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Medicine - organization & administration - standards
Referral and Consultation
Registries
Specialization
Sweden
Abstract
The Federation of Swedish County Councils and six medical specialties are working together in a project aiming to support and stimulate the development of patient based case registers as a tool to follow up, evaluate, develop and manage medical units. The project is based on participation on the part of the medical professions in a process-oriented way. Each case register shall be based on the individual patient, and will integrate inpatient and outpatient care, all medical professions and important procedures. In hematology the project also seeks to merge case costing data with the patient based case registers in order to facilitate more comprehensive cost analysis and comparison. This episodic perspective is useful for providers per se as well as in discussions between purchasers and providers as a method for understanding and analyzing medical services. The six specialties are hematology, obstetrics and gynecology, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology, dermatology and sexually transmitted diseases, and lastly psychiatry.
PubMed ID
11213705 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Professional learning and collective knowledge. Learning environment in two Norwegian hospital departments].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206488
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Jan 10;118(1):48-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-10-1998
Author
V. Akre
S R Ludvigsen
Author Affiliation
Legeforeningens forskningsinstitutt, Sentrum, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Jan 10;118(1):48-52
Date
Jan-10-1998
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Competence
Education, Medical, Continuing
Hospital Departments - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Knowledge
Learning
Norway
Questionnaires
Surgery Department, Hospital - organization & administration - standards
Abstract
Conditions for learning in two Norwegian hospital departments are explored in this article. 20 in-depth interviews with physicians working on the surgical and medical departments of a large general hospital were carried out in 1994. We focus on the social aspects of learning and apply access to learning situations as an analytical perspective to explain how possibilities for learning are created in the daily activities of the two departments. Access to learning situations is created in a "zone of possibility" between the formal organisation and the more informal interpersonal networks in the hospital. The division of the department into sections is used as an example of how organisational factors determine with which areas one becomes familiar. The notion of "the good apprentice" and the relationship between initiative and invitation illuminate the significance of interpersonal factors for access to learning situations. Finally, we illustrate how time is an important but scarce resource influencing the development of shared knowledge in the department.
PubMed ID
9481911 View in PubMed
Less detail

Psychometric properties of the Norwegian version of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ), Generic version (Short Form 2006).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91927
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2008;8:191
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Deilkås Ellen T
Hofoss Dag
Author Affiliation
Health Services Research Unit, Akershus University Hospital, Lorenskog, Norway. ellen.deilkaas@ahus.no
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2008;8:191
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allied Health Personnel - psychology
Attitude of Health Personnel
Hospital Departments - organization & administration - standards
Hospital Units - organization & administration - standards
Hospitals, University - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Leadership
Medical Staff, Hospital - psychology
Norway
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Organizational Culture
Patient care team
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Safety Management
Translations
Abstract
BACKGROUND: How to protect patients from harm is a question of universal interest. Measuring and improving safety culture in care giving units is an important strategy for promoting a safe environment for patients. The Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) is the only instrument that measures safety culture in a way which correlates with patient outcome. We have translated the SAQ to Norwegian and validated the translated version. The psychometric properties of the translated questionnaire are presented in this article. METHODS: The questionnaire was translated with the back translation technique and tested in 47 clinical units in a Norwegian university hospital. SAQ's (the Generic version (Short Form 2006) the version with the two sets of questions on perceptions of management: on unit management and on hospital management) were distributed to 1911 frontline staff. 762 were distributed during unit meetings and 1149 through the postal system. Cronbach alphas, item-to-own correlations, and test-retest correlations were calculated, and response distribution analysis and confirmatory factor analysis were performed, as well as early validity tests. RESULTS: 1306 staff members completed and returned the questionnaire: a response rate of 68%. Questionnaire acceptability was good. The reliability measures were acceptable. The factor structure of the responses was tested by confirmatory factor analysis. 36 items were ascribed to seven underlying factors: Teamwork Climate, Safety Climate, Stress Recognition, Perceptions of Hospital Management, Perceptions of Unit Management, Working conditions, and Job satisfaction. Goodness-of-Fit Indices showed reasonable, but not indisputable, model fit. External validity indicators - recognizability of results, correlations with "trigger tool"-identified adverse events, with patient satisfaction with hospitalization, patient reports of possible maltreatment, and patient evaluation of organization of hospital work - provided preliminary validation. CONCLUSION: Based on the data from Akershus University Hospital, we conclude that the Norwegian translation of the SAQ showed satisfactory internal psychometric properties. With data from one hospital only, we cannot draw strong conclusions on its external validity. Further validation studies linking the SAQ-scores to patient outcome data should be performed.
PubMed ID
18808693 View in PubMed
Less detail

11 records – page 1 of 2.