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Accidental falls related to shovelling snow from rooftops: analysis of injuries in an extraordinary epidemic in southern Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259244
Source
Scand J Surg. 2012;101(4):271-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
M. Aulanko
L. Handolin
T. Söderlund
J. Pajarinen
Source
Scand J Surg. 2012;101(4):271-4
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - economics - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospital Costs - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Snow
Wounds and Injuries - economics - epidemiology - etiology - surgery
Abstract
Exceptional amount of snow led to snow removal attempts from the rooftops resulting in a relative unique and extraordinary epidemic of accidental falls in winter of 2010.
The injury pattern, hospital care, surgical operations, and the total costs of the primary hospital stay of accidentally fallen patients treated in Helsinki University Hospital trauma unit were analyzed.
Forty-six patients were admitted to hospital during the study period of three months. Majority of the patients were males (N?=?43, 93%) with the average age of 52.9 years. Seven patients were admitted to ICU. The average length of primary hospital stay was 4.7 days with 0% mortality. Total amount of fractures was 65 (63%) of all 97 injuries. The most common injuries were fractures of upper and lower extremity, and spinal column.
Preventing similar unnecessary epidemics of accidental falls in the future it is important to have professional opinion of the need of snow removal along with understanding of the risk of injury. Wearing appropriate safety equipments, and use professional help when necessary is advisable.
PubMed ID
23238503 View in PubMed
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Achilles tendon ruptures in South-East Finland between 1986-1996, with special reference to epidemiology, complications of surgery and hospital costs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198723
Source
Ann Chir Gynaecol. 2000;89(1):53-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
T. Nyyssönen
P. Lüthje
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Kuusankoski District Hospital, Finland. timo.nyyssonen@tiny.pp.fi
Source
Ann Chir Gynaecol. 2000;89(1):53-7
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achilles Tendon - injuries
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Athletic Injuries - economics - surgery
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospital Costs
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications
Retrospective Studies
Rupture
Tendon Injuries - economics - epidemiology - surgery
Abstract
The incidence of achilles tendon (AT) ruptures is increasing. The aim of the present study was to evaluate annual incidence, aetiology, operative complications and direct hospital costs of AT ruptures.
A retrospective study of 93 consecutive patients operated on for AT rupture from January 1986 to December 1996 at Kuusankoski District Hospital (area with 92,500 inhabitants) was performed. During the observation period no patient with an AT rupture was treated conservatively.
95 AT ruptures were treated including one rerupture (1%) and one patient with two ruptures. There were 7 (7%) patients with an open AT rupture. The total annual incidence in the hospital area was 8.6 (+/- 4.3) and for closed AT ruptures 8.0 (+/- 3.8). The total incidence was 9.3 (+/- 4.6)/10(5) and for closed AT ruptures 8.6 (+/- 4.1)/10(5) inhabitants per year. Most of the injuries were sport related, the most frequent sport being volleyball. Patients operated for closed AT rupture had major surgical complications in 4.5% of the cases and the total complication rate was 11%. The average direct hospital costs per patient was USD 1375.
The incidence of AT ruptures is increasing in South-East Finland. The rate of major surgical complication was low (4.5%) and comparable with earlier studies.
PubMed ID
10791646 View in PubMed
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Activity-based costing in radiology. Application in a pediatric radiological unit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32870
Source
Acta Radiol. 2000 Mar;41(2):189-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
J. Laurila
I. Suramo
M. Brommels
E M Tolppanen
P. Koivukangas
P. Lanning
G. Standertskjöld-Nordenstam
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology, Oulu University Hospital, Finland.
Source
Acta Radiol. 2000 Mar;41(2):189-95
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Cost Savings
Costs and Cost Analysis
Health Care Rationing - economics
Hospital Costs - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Pediatrics - economics
Radiology Department, Hospital - economics
Time and Motion Studies
Abstract
PURPOSE: To get an informative and detailed picture of the resource utilization in a radiology department in order to support its pricing and management. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A system based mainly on the theoretical foundations of activity-based costing (ABC) was designed, tested and compared with conventional costing. The study was performed at the Pediatric Unit of the Department of Radiology, Oulu University Hospital. The material consisted of all the 7,452 radiological procedures done in the unit during the first half of 1994, when both methods of costing where in use. Detailed cost data were obtained from the hospital financial and personnel systems and then related to activity data captured in the radiology information system. RESULTS: The allocation of overhead costs was greatly reduced by the introduction of ABC compared to conventional costing. The overhead cost as a percentage of total costs dropped to one-fourth of total costs, from 57% to 16%. The change of unit costs of radiological procedures varied from -42% to +82%. CONCLUSION: Costing is much more detailed and precise, and the percentage of unspecified allocated overhead costs diminishes drastically when ABC is used. The new information enhances effective departmental management, as the whole process of radiological procedures is identifiable by single activities, amenable to corrective actions and process improvement.
PubMed ID
10741796 View in PubMed
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Source
Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jul;24 Suppl B:6B-8B
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Serge Lepage
Author Affiliation
Cardiology Division, Faculty of Medicine, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec. serge.lepage@USherbrooke.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jul;24 Suppl B:6B-8B
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Cardiotonic Agents - therapeutic use
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Heart Failure - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Hospital Costs
Hospitalization - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Natriuretic Peptide, Brain - therapeutic use
Patient Readmission - economics - statistics & numerical data
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Survival Analysis
Abstract
Acute decompensated heart failure is the most common cause of hospitalization for patients older than 65 years of age. Although treatment of this condition has improved over the past two decades, the specific approach to patients in the acute setting has not evolved in the same way. A patient facing acute decompensation is experiencing a serious medical condition that is associated with a poor prognosis. In addition, acute decompensated heart failure results in significant costs to the health care system. Significant morbidity and mortality are associated with patients who are readmitted within a year of the first hospitalization. Because of this important problem, further research on improving the prognosis for this condition is warranted. The present article will focus on the risk factors associated with acute decompensation and the importance of this condition, both on prognosis and economics.
Notes
Cites: Rev Cardiovasc Med. 2003;4 Suppl 7:S21-3014668697
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2004 May 1;20(6):599-60715152289
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2005 Nov 28;165(21):2486-9216314545
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2005 Dec;21(14):1301-616341301
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2006 Jul 20;355(3):260-916855266
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2003 Mar 31;19(4):436-812704492
Cites: Circulation. 2007 Jun 19;115(24):3103-1017548729
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2001 Oct 22;161(19):2337-4211606149
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2003 Mar;24(5):442-6312633546
Cites: Int J Cardiol. 2003 Mar;88(1):33-4112659982
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2003 Mar 31;19(4):430-512704491
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2007 Jan;23(1):21-4517245481
PubMed ID
18629381 View in PubMed
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Acute pancreatitis--costs for healthcare and loss of production.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106661
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2013 Dec;48(12):1459-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Bodil Andersson
Björn Appelgren
Viktor Sjödin
Daniel Ansari
Johan Nilsson
Ulf Persson
Bobby Tingstedt
Roland Andersson
Author Affiliation
Departments of Surgery, Clinical science in Lund, Lund University and Skåne University hospital , Lund , Sweden.
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2013 Dec;48(12):1459-65
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cost of Illness
Efficiency
Female
Hospital Costs - statistics & numerical data
Hospitalization - economics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Pancreatitis - economics - therapy
Regression Analysis
Severity of Illness Index
Sick Leave - economics - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
OBJECTIVE. Severity of acute pancreatitis (AP) can vary from a mild to a fulminant disease with high morbidity and mortality. Cost analysis has, however, hitherto been sparse. The aim of this study was to calculate the cost of acute pancreatitis, both including hospital costs and costs due to loss of production. MATERIAL AND METHODS. All adult patients treated at Skane University Hospital, Lund, during 2009-2010, were included. A severity grading was conducted and cost analysis was performed on an individual basis. RESULTS. Two hundred and fifty-two patients with altogether 307 admissions were identified. Mean age was 60 ± 19 years, and 121 patients (48%) were men. Severe AP (SAP) was diagnosed in 38 patients (12%). Thirteen patients (5%) died. Acute biliary pancreatitis was more costly than alcohol induced AP (p
PubMed ID
24131379 View in PubMed
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Addressing myths about end-of-life care: research into the use of acute care hospitals over the last five years of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190268
Source
J Palliat Care. 2002;18(1):29-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Donna M Wilson
Corrine D Truman
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
J Palliat Care. 2002;18(1):29-38
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta
Attitude to Death
Attitude to Health
Female
Health Services Research
Hospital Bed Capacity - statistics & numerical data
Hospital Costs - statistics & numerical data - trends
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data - trends
Male
Middle Aged
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Terminal Care - statistics & numerical data - trends - utilization
Abstract
Despite very little confirming evidence, one of the most pervasive beliefs about dying is that terminally ill people receive a great deal of health care in the last few days, weeks, or months of life. A secondary analysis of 1992/93 through 1996/97 Alberta inpatient hospital abstracts data was undertaken to explore and describe hospital use over the five years before death by all Albertans who died in acute care hospital beds during the 1996/97 year (n = 7,429). There were four key findings: (1) hospital use varied, but was most often low, (2) the last hospital stay was infrequently resource intensive, (3) age, gender, and illness did not distinguish use, and (4) most ultra-high users were rural residents, with the majority of care episodes taking place in small, rural hospitals.
PubMed ID
12001400 View in PubMed
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Adverse events in older patients admitted to acute care: a preliminary cost description.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146799
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2009;22(3):32-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Stacy Ackroyd-Stolarz
Judith Read Guernsey
Neil J MacKinnon
George Kovacs
Author Affiliation
Department of Emergency Medicine at Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia.
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2009;22(3):32-6
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Costs and Cost Analysis
Databases as Topic
Emergency Service, Hospital
Female
Hospital Costs - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Medical Errors - economics
Nova Scotia
Retrospective Studies
Risk Management
Abstract
The financial costs associated with Adverse Events (AEs) for older patients (> or = 65 years) in Canadian hospitals are unknown. The objective of this paper is to describe and compare costs between patients who experienced an AE and those who did not during an acute hospital admission to a tertiary care facility. Patients with an AE had twice the hospital length of stay (20.2 versus 9.8 days, p
PubMed ID
19999374 View in PubMed
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An 8-year follow-up study of 221 consecutive hip fracture patients in Finland: analysis of reoperations and their direct medical costs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259158
Source
Scand J Surg. 2014 Mar;103(1):46-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
P. Lüthje
T. Helkamaa
I. Nurmi-Lüthje
J-P Kaukonen
M. Kataja
Source
Scand J Surg. 2014 Mar;103(1):46-53
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - economics - statistics & numerical data
Cost of Illness
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Fracture Fixation, Internal - economics - statistics & numerical data
Hip Fractures - economics - surgery
Hospital Costs - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications - economics - surgery
Reoperation - economics - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Some hip fracture patients need one or more reoperations because of complications following initial operative treatment.
The aim of this study was to identify all further surgical interventions in a cohort of patients with hip fractures over a period of 8 years after index fracture. Immediate direct costs of these reoperations were also calculated.
This retrospective study investigated 221 consecutive patients with hip fractures operated on at two different hospitals in southeastern Finland. The study period in hospital A was from 1 February 2003 to 31 January 2004, and in hospital B from 1 February 2003 to 30 April 2004. About 50% were femoral neck fractures, 41% trochanteric fractures, and 9% subtrochanteric fractures. Patients' medical records were checked from the hospital records and confirmed manually. Short- and long-term complications were recorded. Survival analysis was performed using a life-table method. The actual costs for reoperations and other further procedures for each patient were calculated using diagnosis-related groups-based costs for both hospitals in 2012.
A total of 20 patients (9%) needed reoperations. Overall, 10 patients (8.9%) with a femoral neck fracture (n = 112), 8 patients (8.7%) with trochanteric fracture (n = 92), and 2 patients (10.5%) with subtrochanteric fracture (n = 19) were reoperated on. The median interval between the primary operation of the acute hip fracture (n = 20) and the first reoperation was about 300 days (range: 2 weeks to 82 months). Among the women reoperated on, the excess mortality was lower than among those undergoing a single operation. The median costs of treatment per patient with one or more reoperations were ?13,422 in hospital A (range: ?1616-?61,755), ?11,076 in hospital B (range: ?1540-?17,866), and ?12,850 in the total study group (p = 0.43). In the case of infections (3 patients), the mean costs per patient were ?28,751 (range: ?11,076-?61,755).
Almost 10% of hip fracture patients required reoperations, and these reoperations caused significant direct costs to health care. However, direct costs account for only approximately 25% of the first year's total costs. These costs should be taken into account when evaluating the economics of hip fractures and the burden of health care.
PubMed ID
24056138 View in PubMed
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Analysing current trends in care of acute myocardial infarction using PERFECT data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133898
Source
Ann Med. 2011 Jun;43 Suppl 1:S14-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Unto Häkkinen
Juha Hartikainen
Merja Juntunen
Antti Malmivaara
Mikko Peltola
Ilkka Tierala
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. unto.hakkinen@thl.fi
Source
Ann Med. 2011 Jun;43 Suppl 1:S14-21
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospital Costs - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - economics - epidemiology - therapy
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - economics - statistics & numerical data - trends
Quality Assurance, Health Care - statistics & numerical data - trends
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This article in the supplement issue on the Performance, Effectiveness, and Costs of Treatment episodes (PERFECT)-project describes the PERFECT AMI (acute myocardial infarction) Database, which is developed to measure the performance of hospitals and hospital districts in Finland. We analyse annual trends and regional differences in performance indicators and whether the utilisation of services and costs of hospital care are related to improvement in survival of AMI patients.
The study population consists of ten annual cohorts (1998-2007) of patients hospitalised for AMI.
Since 1998 the treatment pattern has changed rather radically, the utilisation rate of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has increased and coronary procedures have been performed earlier after myocardial infarction. Outcome measured by various measures of mortality has improved considerably. However, trends in the development of the use of services and outcomes are not similar between hospital districts. An increase in cost was positively and statistically significantly related to decrease in mortality, but the effect was not very strong.
There is potential for decreased mortality from actions that do not increase the costs and for enhancing performance in the regions and hospitals with poor performance.
PubMed ID
21639713 View in PubMed
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348 records – page 1 of 35.