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Accident prevention--establish safety program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241945
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1983 May;60(5):21
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1983

The accuracy of administrative data diagnoses of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134892
Source
J Rheumatol. 2011 Aug;38(8):1612-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Sasha Bernatsky
Tina Linehan
John G Hanly
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, McGill University Health Centre (MUHC), Montreal, Quebec, Canada. sasha.bernatsky@mail.mcgill.ca
Source
J Rheumatol. 2011 Aug;38(8):1612-6
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Autoimmune Diseases - diagnosis - immunology
Databases, Factual - standards
Hospital Administration - standards
Humans
Nova Scotia
Organization and Administration - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Rheumatic Diseases - diagnosis - immunology
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
To examine the validity of case definitions for systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases [SARD; systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc), myositis, Sjögren's syndrome, vasculitis, and polymyalgia rheumatica] based on administrative data, compared to rheumatology records.
A list of rheumatic disease diagnoses was generated from population-based administrative billing and hospitalization databases. Subjects who had been seen by an arthritis center rheumatologist were identified, and the medical records reviewed.
We found that 844 Nova Scotia residents had a diagnosis of one of the rheumatic diseases of interest, based on administrative data, and had had = 1 rheumatology assessment at a provincial arthritis center. Charts were available on 824 subjects, some of whom had been identified in the administrative database with > 1 diagnosis. Thus a total of 1136 diagnoses were available for verification against clinical records. Of the 824 subjects, 680 (83%) had their administrative database diagnoses confirmed on chart review. The majority of subjects who were "false-positive" for a given rheumatic disease on administrative data had a true diagnosis of a similar rheumatic disease. Most sensitivity estimates for specific administrative data-based case definitions were > 90%, although for SSc, the sensitivity was 80.5%. The specificity estimates were also > 90%, except for SLE, where the specificity was 72.5%.
Although health administrative data may be a valid resource, there are potential problems regarding the specificity and sensitivity of case definitions, which should be kept in mind for future studies.
PubMed ID
21532057 View in PubMed
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An Elder-Friendly Hospital: translating a dream into reality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177768
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2004 Mar;17(1):62-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Belinda Parke
Penny Brand
Author Affiliation
Older Adult Health, Chilliwack Health Services, Chilliwack, BC. bparke@shaw.ca
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2004 Mar;17(1):62-76
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
British Columbia
Geriatric Assessment
Health Facility Environment
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Hospital Administration - standards
Humans
Mass Screening
Needs Assessment
Organizational Culture
Organizational Innovation
Organizational Objectives
Organizational Policy
Patient care team
Patient-Centered Care - organization & administration
Philosophy, Medical
Program Development
Risk assessment
Abstract
The complex health profile of an older adult entering a hospital presents staff and administrators with a new challenge. This paper documents the Vancouver Island Health Authority's (VIHA) move towards an Elder-Friendly Hospital (EFH). A new approach to hospital care is described, one that takes account not only of an acute healthcare crisis, but also the developmental phenomena associated with aging, with the likelihood of chronic illnesses compounding both diagnosis and treatment. Customized strategies and suggestions for implementation that may be useful to other healthcare agencies are explained.
Notes
Comment In: Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2004 Mar;17(1):76-715503918
PubMed ID
15503917 View in PubMed
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A care policy and its implementation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71775
Source
Int J Nurs Pract. 2001 Apr;7(2):92-103
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Author
G. Lövgren
G. Aström
B. Engström
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Sweden. gunvor.lovgren@nurs.umu.se
Source
Int J Nurs Pract. 2001 Apr;7(2):92-103
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Female
Hospital Administration - standards
Humans
Male
Organizational Innovation
Organizational Policy
Primary Health Care - organization & administration - standards
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Total Quality Management
Abstract
Chief physicians, nurse managers and head nurses (n = 50) in hospital care and primary health care in Västerbotten, Sweden, were interviewed to explore their views on adopting and implementing a new care policy. The results indicated agreement among the respondents concerning the values of the care policy and its adaptability to the health-care system. More respondents in hospital care than in primary health care expressed a positive view (63%, respectively 55%), reported involvement in the implementation process (64%, respectively 35%) and planned or ongoing activities (63%, respectively 45%). Obstacles in the implementation process due to a frustrated situation and barriers between professional groups were, however, expressed by 67% of the respondents, more among the respondents in primary health care than among those in hospital care (75%, respectively 62%). Divergent views among respondents working in the same department were seen in both hospital care and primary health care. The findings indicated demands for further efforts if the implementation is to move on from its early stages, especially in primary health care.
PubMed ID
11811322 View in PubMed
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CIHI's hospital standardized mortality ratio: friend or foe?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155909
Source
Healthc Pap. 2008;8(4):57-61; discussion 69-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Susan E Brien
William A Ghali
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health and Policy Studies, Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary.
Source
Healthc Pap. 2008;8(4):57-61; discussion 69-75
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Hospital Administration - standards
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Quality Assurance, Health Care - organization & administration
Quality Indicators, Health Care - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Safety - standards
Abstract
Hospital standardized mortality ratios (HSMRs) for acute care hospitals across Canada (excluding Quebec) were released in November 2007 by the Canadian Institute for Health Information. Since the release, some hospitals have undertaken in-depth analyses of their HSMRs to make sense of their results. In this issue of Healthcare Papers, Penfold et al. describe their experiences with the measure, pointing out shortcomings with using such a highly aggregated measure of hospital performance. We echo their concerns with the HSMR and highlight the caveats to interpreting this measure. However, we also point out that, despite its limitations, the HSMR stimulated the authors to probe, on behalf of their institution, factors that may have influenced mortality rates. This probing underlines the merit of HSMR reporting and the types of insights and knowledge that are likely to be gained if other institutions undertake similar evaluations.
Notes
Comment On: Healthc Pap. 2008;8(4):4-518667875
PubMed ID
18667873 View in PubMed
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Continuous quality improvement: a survey of American and Canadian healthcare executives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209691
Source
Hosp Health Serv Adm. 1997;42(4):525-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
Y C Chan
S J Ho
Author Affiliation
Michael G. DeGroote School of Business, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario.
Source
Hosp Health Serv Adm. 1997;42(4):525-44
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Chief Executive Officers, Hospital - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Hospital Administration - standards
Hospital Bed Capacity
Hospitals, Teaching - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Questionnaires
Total Quality Management - statistics & numerical data
United States
Abstract
The continuous quality improvement (CQI) movement, while experiencing great popularity years ago, has been declining in interest across other industries. This article studied American and Canadian hospital executives who have embraced the concept of CQI and will continue to be committed to CQI efforts in the future. Executives of CQI hospitals strongly believe that CQI is not a fad and is essential to their organizations' survival. The majority of the hospital executives in the sample have a good understanding of CQI. The drive to provide quality service to both internal and external customers is the primary motivation for being involved with CQI. Some unsuccessful CQI efforts can be attributed to a lack of CQI skills, poor planning, and insufficient staffing. Close to 90 percent of the respondents expected their involvement with CQI to increase significantly in the future. This result implies that CQI is still being considered and will maintain its role as an effective management tool in the healthcare sector.
PubMed ID
10174464 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 1999;12(3):45-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
B. Parke
L. Stevenson
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 1999;12(3):45-8
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Health Facility Environment
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Hospital Administration - standards
Hospital-Patient Relations
Humans
Leadership
National Health Programs
Organizational Culture
Planning Techniques
Professional-Patient Relations
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Abstract
Older adults comprise the majority of people receiving hospital services in many regions of our country today. Current literature is fraught with stories of how risky hospitalization can be for an older adult. Even with the best intentions, being in hospital can set up a cascade of events for older adults and their families that result in longer lengths of stay and functional disability. In a climate of fiscal restraint, competing priorities and public pressure, meeting the challenges of hospitalization for this population is not an easy task. As the number of older adults in acute care rises and the average length of stay continues to decrease, it is necessary for acute care hospitals to rethink their views of caring for older adults; fundamental shifts are required. The purpose of this paper is to describe the "Elder Friendly Hospital" (EFH) concept and explain the strategies taken by the Capital Health Region in Victoria British Columbia.
PubMed ID
10623168 View in PubMed
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Creative solutions through utilization management.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221679
Source
Leadersh Health Serv. 1993 Mar-Apr;2(2):25-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
B S Brown
R J Smith
Source
Leadersh Health Serv. 1993 Mar-Apr;2(2):25-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Appointments and Schedules
British Columbia
Cholecystectomy, Laparoscopic - utilization
Efficiency
Forms and Records Control - methods
Home Care Services - utilization
Hospital Administration - standards
Humans
Infusions, Intravenous - methods
Operating Rooms - utilization
Patient Care Planning - organization & administration
Program Development - methods
Utilization Review - organization & administration
Abstract
In this second and concluding report on utilization management practices at Lions Gate Hospital in British Columbia, the authors outline various initiatives that improve efficiency and increase quality of care. Topics explored are laparoscopic cholecystectomy as an example of new technology that can save time and resources, a home IV therapy program, co-ordinating care by means of coordinated care mapping, and improving operating room efficiency through rigorous scheduling.
PubMed ID
10125209 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Healthc Pap. 2008;8(4):54-6; discussion 69-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Shauna Figler
Author Affiliation
Hospital Service Branch, Department of Health in New Brunswick.
Source
Healthc Pap. 2008;8(4):54-6; discussion 69-75
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Hospital Administration - standards
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Quality Assurance, Health Care - organization & administration
Quality Indicators, Health Care - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Safety Management - standards
Abstract
In the lead article, Penfold et al. question whether the hospital standardized mortality rate (HSMR) is a valid indicator for hospitals to use in addressing patient safety. Their article attempts to show that the HSMR is flawed and should not be used as an indicator for patient safety; however, the rationale presented fails to address the real issue found within the Winnipeg Health Authority. A hands-on approach to sorting through the data can reveal internal issues and spur quality improvement.
Notes
Comment On: Healthc Pap. 2008;8(4):4-518667875
PubMed ID
18667872 View in PubMed
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56 records – page 1 of 6.