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269 records – page 1 of 27.

24-h sheltering behaviour of individually kept horses during Swedish summer weather.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276827
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2015 Aug 20;57:45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-20-2015
Author
Elke Hartmann
Richard J Hopkins
Claudia von Brömssen
Kristina Dahlborn
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2015 Aug 20;57:45
Date
Aug-20-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Husbandry - methods - physiology
Animal Welfare - methods - physiology
Animals - methods - physiology
Behavior, Animal - methods - physiology
Circadian Rhythm - methods - physiology
Female - methods - physiology
Horses - methods - physiology
Housing, Animal - methods - physiology
Insects - methods - physiology
Male - methods - physiology
Seasons - methods - physiology
Sweden - methods - physiology
Weather - methods - physiology
Abstract
Provision of shelter for horses kept on summer pasture is rarely considered in welfare guidelines, perhaps because the benefits of shelter in warm conditions are poorly documented scientifically. For cattle, shade is a valued resource during summer and can mitigate the adverse effects of warm weather on well-being and performance. We found in a previous study that horses utilized shelters frequently in summer. A shelter with a roof and closed on three sides (shelter A) was preferred and can reduce insect pressure whereas a shelter with roof and open on three sides was not utilized. However, shelter A restricts the all-round view of a horse, which may be important for horses as flight animals. Therefore, we studied whether a shelter with roof, where only the upper half of the rear wall was closed (shelter B), would be utilized while maintaining insect protection properties and satisfying the horses' sense for security. A third shelter was offered with walls but no roof (shelter C) to evaluate whether the roof itself is an important feature from the horse's perspective. Eight Warmblood horses were tested each for 2?days, kept individually for 24?h in two paddocks with access to shelters A and B, or shelters A and C, respectively. Shelter use was recorded continuously during the night (1800-2400?h, 0200-0600?h) and the following day (0900-1600?h), and insect defensive behaviour (e.g., tail swish) in instantaneous scan samples at 5-min intervals during daytime.
Seven horses used both shelters A and B, but when given the choice between shelters A and C, shelter C was scarcely visited. There was no difference in duration of shelter use between night (105.8???53.6?min) and day (100.8???53.8, P?=?0.829). Daytime shelter use had a significant effect on insect defensive behaviours (P?=?0.027). The probability of performing these behaviours was lowest when horses used shelter A compared to being outside (P?=?0.038).
Horses only utilized shelters with a roof whilst a shelter with roof and closed on three sides had the best potential to lower insect disturbance during daytime in summer.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26289447 View in PubMed
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Acquired equine polyneuropathy of Nordic horses: A conspicuous inclusion body schwannopathy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292620
Source
Neuromuscul Disord. 2017 Oct; 27(10):931-941
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2017
Author
S Hanche-Olsen
K Matiasek
J Molín
M Rosati
C Hahn
K Hultin Jäderlund
G Gröndahl
Author Affiliation
Department of Companion Animal Clinical Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ullevålsvn 72, 0454 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: siv.hanche-olsen@nmbu.no.
Source
Neuromuscul Disord. 2017 Oct; 27(10):931-941
Date
Oct-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Female
Horse Diseases - pathology
Horses
Male
Muscles - pathology
Norway
Polyneuropathies - etiology - pathology - veterinary
Schwann Cells - pathology
Sweden
Abstract
Acquired equine polyneuropathy (AEP), formerly also known as Scandinavian knuckling syndrome, is one of the most prevalent polyneuropathies in equids in Norway and Sweden, with more than 400 cases registered since first observations in 1995. Despite geographical clustering and an association to forage feeding, its aetiology remains unknown. Clinically AEP is characterized by knuckling due to dysfunction of metatarsophalangeal extensor muscles. This neuropathological study aimed to gain further insights in the pathobiology of AEP and its underlying aetiopathogenesis. We thereby confirmed that all affected horses suffered from similar large fibre neuropathy, exhibiting conspicuous Schwann cell inclusions in most samples, suggestive of a primary disruption of Schwann cell metabolism leading to inclusion body schwannopathy with secondary inflammatory changes. The degree of nerve pathology was not predictive of clinical outcome.
PubMed ID
28694072 View in PubMed
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Acute-phase proteins as diagnostic markers in horses with colic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281544
Source
J Vet Emerg Crit Care (San Antonio). 2016 Sep;26(5):664-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Tina H Pihl
Elrien Scheepers
Macarena Sanz
Amelia Goddard
Patrick Page
Nils Toft
Mads Kjelgaard-Hansen
Pia H Andersen
Stine Jacobsen
Source
J Vet Emerg Crit Care (San Antonio). 2016 Sep;26(5):664-74
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute-Phase Proteins - metabolism
Animals
Ascitic Fluid - metabolism
Biomarkers - blood - metabolism
Colic - diagnosis - veterinary
Denmark
Female
Fibrinogen - metabolism
Haptoglobins - metabolism
Horse Diseases - blood - diagnosis
Horses
Male
Prospective Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Serum Amyloid A Protein - metabolism
Abstract
To investigate the diagnostic potential of the concentrations of acute-phase proteins serum amyloid A (SAA), haptoglobin (Hp), and fibrinogen in blood and peritoneal fluid (PF) for differentiating horses with inflammatory colic (entero-colitis and peritonitis) from those with surgical colic.
Prospective observational multicenter study.
Two university referral hospitals.
Horses referred for severe acute abdominal pain to Hospital 1 (n = 148) or Hospital 2 (n = 78).
Blood and PF samples collected at admission were used for acute-phase protein concentration measurement.
A multivariable logistic model including clinical parameters (lethargy, rectal temperature >38°C [100.4°F], normal rectal examination findings, and gastric reflux of 5-10 L) recorded at admission was constructed from Hospital 1 data. The ability of the model to correctly differentiate inflammatory from surgical colic was 86% determined as area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. Adding blood parameters (WBC, PCV, total plasma protein, lactate, SAA, Hp, and fibrinogen concentrations) to the logistic model based on clinical parameters revealed that only WBC and SAA and fibrinogen concentrations improved the model. With SAA included in the model no additional blood parameters improved the model, and the final model had an area under the curve of 90%. Addition of PF parameters (hemolysis, total protein concentration, WBC, SAA, or Hp concentrations) did not improve the model. When validated in Hospital 2 data, the models had good integrity and diagnostic performance.
Evaluation of SAA in serum improved the ability to differentiate horses with acute inflammatory colic requiring medical treatment from horses with colic requiring surgery, as it allowed an additional 4% of horses to be correctly classified into medical and surgical cases. Improved differentiation of these 2 groups of horses with colic may minimize the risk of unnecessary or delayed surgery.
PubMed ID
27384962 View in PubMed
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Age and sex differences in numerical responses, dietary shifts, and total responses of a generalist predator to population dynamics of main prey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307084
Source
Oecologia. 2020 Mar; 192(3):699-711
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2020
Author
Giulia Masoero
Toni Laaksonen
Chiara Morosinotto
Erkki Korpimäki
Author Affiliation
Section of Ecology, Department of Biology, University of Turku, 20014, Turku, Finland. giulia.masoero@gmail.com.
Source
Oecologia. 2020 Mar; 192(3):699-711
Date
Mar-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Arvicolinae
Female
Finland
Horses
Male
Population Dynamics
Predatory Behavior
Strigiformes
Abstract
Fluctuations in the abundance of main prey species might shape animal communities, by inducing numerical responses and dietary shifts in predators. Whether numerical responses and dietary shifts differ among individuals of different age and sex has so far gained little attention. These differences could affect how much predators consume main and alternative prey, thus causing variation in predation pressure on main and alternative prey species. We studied the effect of fluctuating main prey abundance (voles) in autumn on the age and sex composition of a food-hoarding population of Eurasian pygmy owls Glaucidium passerinum (327 individuals), and on the species composition of their food stores in western Finland during 2003-2017 (629 food stores). Numbers of yearlings (
Notes
ErratumIn: Oecologia. 2021 Feb;195(2):557-558 PMID 33387009
PubMed ID
32008080 View in PubMed
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[Age makeup of female Culicoides sinanoensis Tok. in the coniferous-broad-leaved forest zone of the southern Maritime Territory].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature253012
Source
Parazitologiia. 1974 Nov-Dec;8(6):524-30
Publication Type
Article

Allergic dermatitis (sweet itch) of Icelandic horses in Sweden: an epidemiological study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52920
Source
Equine Vet J. 1987 May;19(3):229-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1987
Author
H. Broström
A. Larsson
M. Troedsson
Source
Equine Vet J. 1987 May;19(3):229-36
Date
May-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Animals
Ceratopogonidae
Dermatitis - epidemiology - veterinary
Female
Horse Diseases - epidemiology
Horses
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - veterinary
Iceland
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
A survey of allergic dermatitis (sweet itch) in Sweden contained information on 441 Icelandic horses. Results of a questionnaire indicated that approximately 15 per cent of the country's Icelandic horses suffered from the disease. The prevalence of allergic dermatitis was significantly higher among horses imported from Iceland (26.2 per cent) compared to that of Swedish-born animals (6.7 per cent). In addition, horses born in Iceland were significantly more severely affected than horses born in Sweden. The risk of allergic dermatitis in Sweden appeared to be more than six times higher for horses exported from Iceland to Sweden relative to that of horses originally born in Sweden. The prevalence of disease for horses of seven years or older was 30 per cent for Icelandic-born individuals as compared to 7.3 per cent for horses born in Sweden. Similarly, the risk of allergic dermatitis in Sweden for horses of seven years or older appeared to be nearly 10 times higher for horses imported from Iceland relative to that of horses born in Sweden. Allergic dermatitis usually appeared during the third grazing season for imported horses and during the fourth season for horses born in Sweden. Furthermore, the course of the disease tended to become worse with time. Analysis of the prevalence of allergic dermatitis relative to gender revealed no significant differences. Certain geographical variations in the prevalence of the disease was also found.
PubMed ID
3608962 View in PubMed
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Allergic sensitization is age-dependently associated with rhinitis, but less so with asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272232
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2015 Dec;136(6):1559-65.e1-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Katja Warm
Linnea Hedman
Anne Lindberg
Jan Lötvall
Bo Lundbäck
Eva Rönmark
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2015 Dec;136(6):1559-65.e1-2
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Allergens - immunology
Alternaria - immunology
Animals
Artemisia - immunology
Asthma - blood - epidemiology
Betula - immunology
Cats - immunology
Dermatophagoides farinae - immunology
Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus - immunology
Dogs - immunology
Female
Horses - immunology
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Phleum - immunology
Pollen - immunology
Rhinitis - blood - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Epidemiologic data describing the association between allergic sensitization and asthma and allergic rhinitis in adults are scarce.
To determine the prevalence and impact of specific sensitization to airborne allergens on asthma and allergic rhinitis among adults in relation to age.
A random population sample (age 21-86 years) was examined with structured interview and analysis of specific IgE to 9 common airborne allergens. Of those invited, 692 (68%) subjects participated in blood sampling. IgE level of 0.35 U/mL or more to the specific allergen was defined as a positive test result.
Allergic sensitization decreased with increasing age, both in the population sample and among subjects with asthma and allergic rhinitis. In a multivariate model, sensitization to animal was significantly positively associated with asthma (odds ratio [OR], 4.80; 95% CI, 2.68-8.60), whereas sensitization to both animal (OR, 3.90; 95% CI, 2.31-6.58) and pollen (OR, 4.25; 95% CI, 2.55-7.06) was significantly associated with allergic rhinitis. The association between allergic sensitization and rhinitis was consistently strongest among the youngest age group, whereas this pattern was not found for asthma. The prevalence of allergic sensitization among patients with asthma decreased by increasing age of asthma onset, 86% with asthma onset at age 6 y or less, 56% at age 7 to 19 years, and 26% with asthma onset at age 20 years or more.
Sensitization to animal was associated with asthma across all age groups; allergic rhinitis was associated with sensitization to both pollen and animal and consistently stronger among younger than among older adults. Early onset of asthma was associated with allergic sensitization among adults with asthma.
PubMed ID
26220530 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Pneumologie. 2009 Jan;63(1):3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Source
Pneumologie. 2009 Jan;63(1):3
Date
Jan-2009
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Asthma - immunology
Horses - immunology - parasitology
Humans
Sweden
PubMed ID
19165702 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analyses of restriction fragment patterns (RFPs) and pathogenicity in baby mice of equine herpesvirus 1 and 4 (EHV-1 and EHV-4) strains circulating in Danish horses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64540
Source
Vet Microbiol. 1995 Nov;47(1-2):199-204
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1995
Author
V. Palfi
L S Christensen
Author Affiliation
National Veterinary Laboratory, Copenhagen N, Denmark.
Source
Vet Microbiol. 1995 Nov;47(1-2):199-204
Date
Nov-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Veterinary - virology
Animals
Animals, Suckling
Biological Assay
Brain - virology
Denmark
Female
Fetal Death - veterinary - virology
Genome, Viral
Genotype
Herpesviridae - classification - genetics - pathogenicity
Herpesviridae Infections - veterinary - virology
Herpesvirus 1, Equid - classification - genetics - pathogenicity
Horse Diseases - virology
Horses
Mice
Paralysis - veterinary - virology
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Tract Infections - veterinary - virology
Viscera - virology
Abstract
Twenty-five strains of equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) and one strain of equine herpesvirus 4 (EHV-4) isolated from material from various clinical cases in Denmark, together with reference EHV-1 and EHV-4 strains, were compared by restriction fragment pattern (RFP) analysis and inoculation of baby mice. The RFP analyses revealed that all EHV-1 strains belonged to genome type Ip. Four fetal isolates exhibited genomic characteristics that have been suggested as specific markers of the attenuated strain Rac H, widely used as a live vaccine. As the use of five vaccines against EHV-1 and EHV-4 has never been allowed in Denmark, it is assumed that Rac H derivatives have been acquired from visiting horses and thus are now circulating in the horse population. Baby mice inoculation revealed that four biotypes could be distinguished on the basis of pathogenicity. However, no strict correlation with pathogenicity in the natural host was seen.
PubMed ID
8604552 View in PubMed
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269 records – page 1 of 27.