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Adjustment among mothers reporting same-gender sexual partners: a study of a representative population sample from Quebec Province (Canada).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162178
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2008 Dec;37(6):864-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Danielle Julien
Emilie Jouvin
Emilie Jodoin
Alexandre L'archevêque
Elise Chartrand
Author Affiliation
Département de psychologie, University of Quebec at Montréal, C. P. 8888, Succ. Centreville, Montreal, QC, Canada. julien.danielle@uqam.ca
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2008 Dec;37(6):864-76
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Bisexuality - statistics & numerical data
Child
Female
Heterosexuality - statistics & numerical data
Homosexuality - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mother-Child Relations
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Parenting - psychology
Quebec - epidemiology
Sexual Partners - psychology
Sexuality - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Socialization
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
We examined the well-being of mothers and non-mothers reporting exclusive opposite-gender sexual partners (OG), same-gender sexual partners (SG), or both (BI) in a representative sample of 20,773 participants (11,034 women) 15-years-old or older from the population of Quebec province in Canada. Participants completed a self-administered questionnaire and SG and BI women (n = 179) were matched to a sample of OG women (n = 179) based on age, income, geographical area, and children (having at least one 18-year-old or younger biological or adopted child at home). We assessed social milieu variables, risk factors for health disorders, mental health, and quality of mothers' relationship with children. The findings indicated a sexual orientation main effect: Mothers and non-mothers in the SG and BI group, as compared to their OG controls, were significantly less likely to live in a couple relationship, had significantly lower levels of social support, higher prevalence of early negative life events, substance abuse, suicide ideation, and higher levels of psychological distress. There were no Sexual Orientation X Parenthood status effects. The results further indicated that sexual orientation did not account for unique variance in women's psychological distress beyond that afforded by their social milieu, health risk factors, and parenthood status. No significant differences were found for the quality of mothers' relationship with children. SG-BI and OG mothers with low levels of social integration were significantly more likely to report problems with children than parents with high levels of social integration. We need to understand how marginal sexualities and their associated social stigma, as risk indicators for mothers, interact with other factors to impact family life, parenting skills, and children's adjustment.
PubMed ID
17665300 View in PubMed
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Cancer in a population-based cohort of men and women in registered homosexual partnerships.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7307
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2003 Jun 1;157(11):966-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-2003
Author
Morten Frisch
Else Smith
Andrew Grulich
Christoffer Johansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology Research, Danish Epidemiology Science Center, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. mfr@ssi.dk
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2003 Jun 1;157(11):966-72
Date
Jun-1-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - complications
Adolescent
Adult
Anus Neoplasms - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Homosexuality - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sarcoma, Kaposi - epidemiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
Cancer patterns among broad populations of homosexual men and women have not been studied systematically. The authors followed 1,614 women and 3,391 men in Denmark for cancer from their first registration for marriage-like homosexual partnership between 1989 and 1997. Ratios of observed to expected cancers measured relative risk. Women in homosexual partnerships had cancer risks similar to those of Danish women in general (overall relative risk (RR) = 0.9, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.6, 1.4), but only one woman developed cervical carcinoma in situ versus 5.8 women expected (RR = 0.2, 95% CI: 0.0, 0.97). Overall, men in homosexual partnerships were at elevated cancer risk (RR = 2.1, 95% CI: 1.8, 2.5), due mainly to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-associated Kaposi's sarcoma (RR = 136, 95% CI: 96, 186) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (RR = 15.1, 95% CI: 10.4, 21.4). Anal squamous carcinoma also occurred in excess (RR = 31.2, 95% CI: 8.4, 79.8). After exclusion of Kaposi's sarcoma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and anal squamous carcinoma, no unusual cancer risk remained (RR = 1.0, 95% CI: 0.8, 1.3). With anal squamous carcinoma and HIV/AIDS-associated cancers as notable exceptions in men, cancer incidence rates among homosexual persons in marriage-like partnerships are similar to those prevailing in society at large.
PubMed ID
12777359 View in PubMed
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Childhood family correlates of heterosexual and homosexual marriages: a national cohort study of two million Danes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80233
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2006 Oct;35(5):533-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Frisch Morten
Hviid Anders
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology Research, Danish Epidemiology Science Center, Statens Serum Institut, 5 Artillerivej, DK-2300, Copenhagen S, Denmark. mfr@ssi.dk
Source
Arch Sex Behav. 2006 Oct;35(5):533-47
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Family Relations
Female
Heterosexuality - statistics & numerical data
Homosexuality - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Marriage - statistics & numerical data
Parent-Child Relations
Psychosexual Development
Questionnaires
Social Conditions
Abstract
Children who experience parental divorce are less likely to marry heterosexually than those growing up in intact families; however, little is known about other childhood factors affecting marital choices. We studied childhood correlates of first marriages (heterosexual since 1970, homosexual since 1989) in a national cohort of 2 million 18-49 year-old Danes. In multivariate analyses, persons born in the capital area were significantly less likely to marry heterosexually, but more likely to marry homosexually, than their rural-born peers. Heterosexual marriage was significantly linked to having young parents, small age differences between parents, stable parental relationships, large sibships, and late birth order. For men, homosexual marriage was associated with having older mothers, divorced parents, absent fathers, and being the youngest child. For women, maternal death during adolescence and being the only or youngest child or the only girl in the family increased the likelihood of homosexual marriage. Our study provides population-based, prospective evidence that childhood family experiences are important determinants of heterosexual and homosexual marriage decisions in adulthood.
PubMed ID
17039403 View in PubMed
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A decade of AIDS, and its implications for Canadian dentistry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220745
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 1993 Jul;59(7):599-606
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1993

A demographic and health profile of gay and bisexual men in a large Canadian urban setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191906
Source
AIDS Care. 2002 Feb;14(1):111-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2002
Author
S. Low-Beer
K. Bartholomew
A E Weber
K. Chan
M. Landolt
D. Oram
A. Schilder
R. Hogg
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, St. Paul's Hospital.
Source
AIDS Care. 2002 Feb;14(1):111-5
Date
Feb-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Bisexuality - statistics & numerical data
British Columbia - epidemiology
HIV Infections - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Homosexuality - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban health
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to provide both a population estimate and a socio-economic and health profile of gay and bisexual men living with HIV/AIDS in a large Canadian urban centre. A random telephone survey was used to determine the number of men in the study area over the age of 20 identifying as gay or bisexual and to characterize their health and socio-economic status. Out of a total of 1,176 completed interviews, 300 males described themselves as gay or bisexual. Projecting this figure on recent census data we estimated the number of men identifying as gay or bisexual in this region of downtown Vancouver, BC, at 5,100. Among these men we found an HIV prevalence rate of 16%, with those who reported a positive serostatus being less likely to be employed full time and more likely to earn less than $20,000 per year. In terms of clinical characteristics, HIV-positive men had a median CD4 cell count of 397 cells/mm(3) and a median viral load of less than 500 copies/ml. Eighty-three per cent of the HIV-positive respondents were on antiretroviral therapy and the median number of drugs taken by these men was three. In summary, random surveys of populations affected by this epidemic are important for policy makers, clinicians and persons caring for those with HIV/AIDS as they paint a clearer picture of who is being affected and help to identify areas where increased services are needed.
PubMed ID
11798410 View in PubMed
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Disparities in tobacco use by sexual orientation among high school students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268437
Source
Prev Med. 2014 Dec;69:307-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Sunday Azagba
Mark Asbridge
Donald Langille
Bruce Baskerville
Source
Prev Med. 2014 Dec;69:307-11
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bisexuality - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression
Female
Heterosexuality - statistics & numerical data
Homosexuality - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Newfoundland and Labrador - epidemiology
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Psychological Tests
Schools
Sex Distribution
Smoking - epidemiology
Students
Tobacco Use - epidemiology
Abstract
This study examined whether cigarette use is associated with sexual orientation among high school students.
Data were from a 2012 cross-sectional survey of 5994 students in grades 9, 10 and 12 attending public schools in Atlantic Canada. Multilevel logistic regression analysis was used to examine differences in cigarette use by sexual orientation.
Lesbian, gay and bisexual adolescents (LGB) reported higher prevalence (22%) of daily cigarette use compared with heterosexuals (11%). Multilevel logistic regression analysis, controlling for standard covariates, found that LGB adolescents were more likely to be daily smokers than non-LGB adolescents (odds ratio 2.00, 95% confidence interval 1.50-2.68). Bisexual adolescents were at least twice more likely to be a smoker compared with heterosexual adolescents.
Prevalence of cigarette use was significantly higher among LGB adolescent students. Our results join a growing body of evidence indicating that sexual minorities are at heightened risk of tobacco use. Smoking cessation measures that specifically target this group may be beneficial given that there is no one size fits all approach.
PubMed ID
25450168 View in PubMed
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The effect of a biological explanation on attitudes towards homosexual persons. A Swedish national sample study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189649
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2002;56(3):181-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Mikael Landén
Sune Innala
Author Affiliation
Section of Psychiatry, Institute of Clinical Neuroscience, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Mölndal, Sweden.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2002;56(3):181-6
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude
Biological Factors
Female
Homosexuality - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Questionnaires
Social Perception
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Studies assessing attitudes towards homosexuals have revealed widespread homophobia. The first aim of this study was to assess potential changes in public attitudes after important legislative changes related to homosexuals in Sweden. The second aim was to test whether the attitudes differ: 1) between people who believe in biological vs. people who believe in psychological theories in explanation of homosexuality, 2) between men and women, and 3) between the older and younger age groups. To this end, a questionnaire survey of a representative, randomly selected, national sample of 992 adult Swedish residents was carried out. The response rate was 67%, which is considered high in this context. In conclusion, this study demonstrates a clear-cut change towards more tolerant attitudes towards homosexual men and women compared to earlier studies. The reasons for this change is discussed; among factors of importance are anti-discrimination legislation, increased visibility of homosexual people, and that more people currently regard homosexuality as a biologically determined, natural variant of human sexuality than was the case 10 years ago. In accordance, this study gave further support to the notion that those who believe that homosexuality is caused by biological factors have a less restrictive view on homosexuality than do people who hold a psychological view.
PubMed ID
12079569 View in PubMed
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HIV testing in Denmark: a nominator-denominator study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8465
Source
AIDS. 1989 Sep;3(9):597-601
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1989
Author
K W Schmidt
A. Krasnik
H. Zoffmann
E. Brendstrup
B. Kvinesdal
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Statens Seruminstitut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
AIDS. 1989 Sep;3(9):597-601
Date
Sep-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
AIDS Serodiagnosis - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Bisexuality
Chi-Square Distribution
Denmark
Female
HIV Infections - epidemiology - psychology
HIV Seroprevalence
Homosexuality - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Odds Ratio
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sexual Behavior
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - epidemiology
Abstract
In order to describe prevalence and trends of HIV infection, demographic variables, risk factors, and reasons for seeking testing, and self-administered anonymous questionnaire was distributed to approximately 75% of all individuals tested for antibodies to HIV on a voluntary basis, in all parts of the Danish health-care system, in November 1987 and in April 1988. The number of questionnaires returned was 2143 (55%). Overall, HIV prevalence was 1.2% and was highest among homosexual and bisexual men: 6% in November and 9% in April, with no statistical difference. Sixteen per cent of the men reported homosexual behaviour, 7% reported intravenous drug use, and 60% more than one opposite-sex partner within the last 12 months. No substantial difference was observed between reported risk factors in November and April. Overall, 18% had been tested at least once before; this figure rose to approximately 50% among homosexual men and intravenous drug abusers, a substantial number of whom had engaged in risk behaviour since the latest test. Sixty percent of men and 75% of women were tested at general practitioners', and 22% and 13% at sexually transmitted disease clinics; only 6% of men and 3% of women had used alternative test sites. It is concluded that studies of anti-HIV-tested people can give detailed information about patterns of HIV testing and indications of trends in HIV infection rates, thereby supplementing other forms of HIV surveillance.
PubMed ID
2506905 View in PubMed
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20 records – page 1 of 2.