Skip header and navigation

Refine By

7 records – page 1 of 1.

Black gay men as sexual subjects: race, racialisation and the social relations of sex among Black gay men in Toronto.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116296
Source
Cult Health Sex. 2013;15(4):434-49
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Winston Husbands
Lydia Makoroka
Rinaldo Walcott
Barry D Adam
Clemon George
Robert S Remis
Sean B Rourke
Author Affiliation
AIDS Committee of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. whusbands@actoronto.org
Source
Cult Health Sex. 2013;15(4):434-49
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
African Continental Ancestry Group - psychology
Bisexuality - ethnology - psychology
HIV Infections - prevention & control - psychology
Homosexuality, Male - ethnology - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Power (Psychology)
Sexual Partners
Young Adult
Abstract
In this study of Black gay and bisexual men in Toronto, sexually active survey participants reported on their sexual behaviours with male partners of different ethnoracial backgrounds, and interview participants reflected on how their sexual relationships emerged in the context of race and interracial desire. Most survey participants reported sexual relationships with other Black men. Participants were more likely to be insertive with White and other ethnoracial men than with Black men. A significant number of participants who were receptive or versatile with Black partners switched to the insertive role when their sexual partners were not Black. Interview participants ascribed a sense of fulfilment to their sexual relationships with other Black men, but avoided relationships with White men or interpreted such relationships as either purely sexual and/or inflected by their racialised objectification. Others avoided sexual relationships with other Black men or preferred relationships with White men, sometimes in opposition to experiences of oppressive masculinity from some Black partners but mindful of the possibility of racialised encounters with their White partners. Study participants emerge as informed sexual subjects, self-conscious about their sexual relationships and variously inclined to negotiate or resist racialisation and oppression in the private and public spheres.
PubMed ID
23414079 View in PubMed
Less detail

Culture, trauma, and wellness: a comparison of heterosexual and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and two-spirit native americans.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3709
Source
Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2004 Aug;10(3):287-301
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
Kimberly F Balsam
Bu Huang
Karen C Fieland
Jane M Simoni
Karina L Walters
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1525, USA. kbalsam@u.washington.edu
Source
Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2004 Aug;10(3):287-301
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Bisexuality - ethnology - psychology
Comparative Study
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Homosexuality, Female - ethnology - psychology
Homosexuality, Male - ethnology - psychology
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology - psychology
Life Change Events
Male
Mental Disorders - ethnology - psychology
Middle Aged
New York City
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Sexual Behavior - ethnology - psychology
Social Identification
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology - psychology
Urban Population
Abstract
In a community-based sample of urban American Indian and Alaska Native adults, 25 lesbian, gay, bisexual, and two-spirit participants were compared with 154 heterosexual participants with respect to sociodemographic characteristics, Native, cultural participation, trauma, physical and mental health, and substance use. Compared with their heterosexual counterparts, two-spirit participants reported higher rates of childhood physical abuse and more historical trauma in their families, higher levels of psychological symptoms, and more mental health service utilization. Two-spirit participants reported differences in patterns of alcohol use and were more likely to have used illicit drugs other than marijuana. Discussion and recommendations for health promotion interventions and future research are presented in consideration of an "indigenist" health model and the multiple minority status of two-spirit people.
PubMed ID
15311980 View in PubMed
Less detail

"Hard to crack": experiences of community integration among first- and second-generation Asian MSM in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108550
Source
Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2013 Jul;19(3):248-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Nadine Nakamura
Elic Chan
Benedikt Fischer
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of La Verne, LA Verne, CA 91750, USA. nnakamura@laverne.edu
Source
Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2013 Jul;19(3):248-56
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asia - ethnology
Canada
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Ethnic Groups - psychology
Focus Groups
Homophobia - ethnology - psychology
Homosexuality, Male - ethnology - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Residence Characteristics
Social Distance
Social Isolation - psychology
Social Participation - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Asians are the largest racial minority in Canada making up 11% of the population and represented over 60% of new immigrants between 2001 and 2006. We examined the experiences of community integration for first-generation (n = 27) and second-generation (n = 22) Asian Canadian men who have sex with men (MSM) in their ethnic and gay communities. Through focus group interviews, we explored their level of connectedness and the level of discrimination they experienced in the two communities. Findings indicate that Asian MSM in general perceived their ethnic community as homophobic, stemming from a combination of seeing sex as taboo, stereotypes about being gay, and the affiliation with religion. Although the literature indicates that immigrants rely on the support of their ethnic communities, our finding suggest that this is not the case for Asian immigrant MSM, who in our sample reported feeling less connected compared to their second-generation counterparts. For the gay community, our sample reported mixed experiences as some regarded it as welcoming, whereas others described it as racist. However, these experiences did not differ by generational status. Many were aware of explicit messages stating "No Asians" in dating contexts, while at the same time being aware that some older White men were interested in dating Asians exclusively. Barriers to integration in both communities may contribute to feelings of isolation. Theoretical implications are discussed.
PubMed ID
23875850 View in PubMed
Less detail

HIV and ethnicity in Canada: is the HIV risk-taking behaviour of young foreign-born MSM similar to Canadian born MSM?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166347
Source
AIDS Care. 2007 Jan;19(1):9-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
C. George
M. Alary
R S Hogg
J. Otis
R S Remis
B. Mâsse
B. Turmel
R. Leclerc
R. Lavoie
J. Vincelette
R. Parent
K. Chan
S. Martindale
M L Miller
K J P Craib
M T Schechter
Author Affiliation
St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario.
Source
AIDS Care. 2007 Jan;19(1):9-16
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - ethnology
Cohort Studies
HIV Infections - ethnology - prevention & control
Homosexuality, Male - ethnology - psychology
Humans
Male
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Transients and Migrants - psychology
Unsafe Sex - ethnology - psychology
Abstract
There is a dearth of information on the HIV risk-taking behaviour of foreign-born men who have sex with men (MSM) in Canada. This study focused on identifying sexual risk behaviour among MSM who immigrated to Canada and compared them to MSM who were born in Canada. Baseline data from the Omega Cohort in Montreal and the Vanguard Project in Vancouver were combined to form four ethnicity/race analytical categories (n = 1,148): White born in Canada (WBIC), White born outside of Canada, non-White born in Canada (NBIC) and non-White born outside of Canada (NBOC). Psychological, demographic and sexual behaviour characteristics of the groups were similar except: NBOC were more likely to be unemployed, less likely to be tattooed, had fewer bisexual experiences and less likely worried of insufficient funds. WBOC were more likely to report unprotected sex with seropositives and more likely to have had unprotected sex while travelling. NBIC were more likely to have ever sold sex and to have had body piercing. WBOC are at high risk of acquiring as well as transmitting HIV. It is important to consider place of birth in addition to ethnicity when developing programmes to prevent the transmission of HIV.
PubMed ID
17129852 View in PubMed
Less detail

'I've had unsafe sex so many times why bother being safe now?': the role of cognitions in sexual risk among American Indian/Alaska Native men who have sex with men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131684
Source
Ann Behav Med. 2011 Dec;42(3):370-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Kimberly M Nelson
Jane M Simoni
Cynthia R Pearson
Karina L Walters
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, USA. knelson6@uw.edu
Source
Ann Behav Med. 2011 Dec;42(3):370-80
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Attitude to Health
Cognition
Condoms - utilization
Cross-Sectional Studies
HIV Infections - ethnology - prevention & control
Homosexuality, Male - ethnology - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Sexual Partners - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - ethnology
Unsafe Sex - ethnology - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) men who have sex with men (MSM) are at high risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquisition and transmission.
This study aimed to investigate a potential area of focus for HIV prevention interventions by assessing the impact of sexual risk cognitions on sexual risk-taking among AI/AN MSM.
AI/AN MSM (N?=?173) from a national cross-sectional survey were analyzed.
Reporting more frequent sexual risk cognitions overall (high sexual risk cognitions) was associated with multiple HIV risk factors including unprotected anal intercourse and serodiscordant unprotected anal intercourse. Participants with high sexual risk cognitions had a 2.3 (95% Confidence Interval: 1.1, 4.7) times greater odds of engaging in unprotected anal intercourse regardless of childhood sexual abuse, depression, and alcohol dependence. Most individual sexual risk cognitions were associated with unprotected anal intercourse, serodiscordant unprotected anal intercourse, or both.
Results suggest that sexual risk cognitions may be a productive area for further work on HIV prevention among AI/AN MSM.
Notes
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2006 Dec;96(12):2240-516670237
Cites: AIDS. 2006 Mar 21;20(5):731-916514304
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2007 May;64(10):2152-6417379373
Cites: AIDS Care. 2007 Apr;19(4):514-2217453592
Cites: AIDS Educ Prev. 2007 Jun;19(3):218-3017563276
Cites: Sex Transm Dis. 2007 Oct;34(10):767-7717538516
Cites: AIDS Educ Prev. 2000 Jun;12(3):199-21310926124
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2000 Jul 15;152(2):99-10610909945
Cites: JAMA. 2008 Aug 6;300(5):520-918677024
Cites: AIDS Care. 2000 Jun;12(3):267-7210928202
Cites: AIDS Care. 2001 Feb;13(1):57-7011177465
Cites: Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2000;9(2):1-2111279555
Cites: Child Abuse Negl. 2001 Apr;25(4):557-8411370726
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2001 Jun;91(6):907-1411392933
Cites: AIDS. 2001 May 25;15(8):1053-511399988
Cites: BMJ. 2001 Jun 16;322(7300):1451-611408300
Cites: J Assoc Nurses AIDS Care. 2001 Sep-Oct;12(5):20-911565236
Cites: J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2002 Jun 1;30(2):177-8612045680
Cites: Sex Transm Infect. 2003 Apr;79(2):142-612690138
Cites: Arch Sex Behav. 2003 Jun;32(3):231-4212807295
Cites: J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2004 Jun 1;36(2):734-4215167293
Cites: Addiction. 2004 Jul;99(7):885-9615200584
Cites: Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2004 Aug;10(3):287-30115311980
Cites: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2008 Oct 3;57(39):1073-618830210
Cites: J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2008 Dec 15;49(5):544-5118989221
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2009 Apr;99 Suppl 1:S144-5119218182
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2009 Apr;99 Suppl 1:S71-619246668
Cites: J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2009 Jul 1;51(3):340-819367173
Cites: Cultur Divers Ethnic Minor Psychol. 2009 Jul;15(3):275-8419594256
Cites: AIDS Care. 2009 Dec;21(12):1481-920024727
Cites: J Addict Dis. 2009 Jul;28(3):208-1820155589
Cites: J Behav Med. 2010 Apr;33(2):147-5820101454
Cites: AIDS Behav. 2010 Jun;14(3):549-5719499321
Cites: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2010 Sep 24;59(37):1201-720864920
Cites: AIDS Behav. 2011 Jul;15(5):970-520680432
Cites: Sex Transm Dis. 2010 Apr;37(4):272-820051930
Cites: AIDS. 1992 Sep;6(9):1021-301388891
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1994 Aug;151(8):1132-68037246
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 1994 Mar-Apr;10(2):77-848037935
Cites: AIDS Care. 1997 Aug;9(4):471-809337891
Cites: Psychol Rep. 1997 Oct;81(2):496-89354100
Cites: Drug Alcohol Depend. 1999 Feb 1;53(3):197-20510080045
Cites: Lancet. 1999 May 15;353(9165):1657-6110335785
Cites: J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2007 Apr 15;44(5):569-7717310937
PubMed ID
21887585 View in PubMed
Less detail

Risk and protective factors for HIV/AIDS in Native Americans: implications for preventive intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89329
Source
Soc Work. 2009 Apr;54(2):145-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Dennis Mary Kate
Author Affiliation
School of Social Work, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. mkdennis@umich.edu
Source
Soc Work. 2009 Apr;54(2):145-54
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Female
HIV Infections - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Homosexuality, Male - ethnology - psychology
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Male
Risk-Taking
Social Work
Abstract
HIV/AIDS has steadily increased in Native American and Alaska Native populations, and despite efforts at control many challenges remain. This article examines historical, biological, social, and behavioral cofactors related to the spread of HIV/AIDS within the context of Native American culture. Special attention is given to vulnerable subgroups and to the need for culturally appropriate efforts at prevention and intervention that respect the unique needs of each group.
PubMed ID
19366163 View in PubMed
Less detail

Sexual orientation and quality of life among university students from Cuba, Norway, India, and South Africa.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149771
Source
J Homosex. 2009;56(5):655-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Bente Traeen
Monica Martinussen
Joar Vittersø
Sunil Saini
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Tromsø, Breivika, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway. bentet@psyk.uit.no
Source
J Homosex. 2009;56(5):655-69
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Cuba
Fear
Female
Happiness
Homosexuality, Female - ethnology - psychology
Homosexuality, Male - ethnology - psychology
Humans
India
Male
Norway
Personal Satisfaction
Quality of Life
Sex Factors
Sexuality - ethnology - psychology
South Africa
Students - psychology
Abstract
This article explores quality-of-life aspects among gay, lesbian, bisexual, and straight male and female students in Havana (Cuba), Tromsø (Norway), Hisar (India), and Cape Town (South Africa). In the period 2004-2005, a questionnaire survey on sexuality, happiness, and life satisfaction was undertaken among 339 students from the University of Havana, 144 students from the University of Tromsø, 200 students from Guru Jambheswar University, and 189 students from the University of the Western Cape. The majority of the participants were straight and, in Hisar and Cape Town, few of those who regarded themselves as gay/lesbian/bisexual had engaged in sex with a person of the same gender. In all cities, straight men and women scored higher than gay, lesbian, and bisexual persons on the quality-of-life measures. Quality of life among gay/bisexual men and lesbian/bisexual women was higher in cultures with accepting attitudes toward homosexuality than in cultures with restrictive attitudes.
PubMed ID
19591038 View in PubMed
Less detail

7 records – page 1 of 1.